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Attend Program Preview at May Roundtables 

Posted by Darlene Scheffler Friday, April 24, 2015 1:40:00 PM

Program Preview is conducted during district roundtables in May. Every unit will receive a copy of the council's Program Guide.

To help support your unit’s annual planning process, information will be available on all the fun, exciting district and council events that are planned for the upcoming year. 

Every unit should send at least one representative.

Find your roundtable date and location

 

Roundtable is a form of supplemental training for volunteers. The objective of Roundtable is to give leaders program ideas, information on upcoming events and trainings, and an opportunity to share experiences and enjoy fun and fellowship with other Scouting leaders. As a result of the roundtable experience, unit leaders will be inspired, motivated, informed, and able to provide a stronger program for their Scouts.

Changes to the Guide to Advancement 

Posted by Darlene Scheffler Thursday, April 23, 2015 8:15:00 AM

The 2015 version of the Guide to Advancement has been released. There are 13 big changes.

Source: Scouting Magazine

The Guide to Advancement is a critical reference tool for anyone involved in advancement in Cub Scouting, Boy Scouting, Varsity Scouting, Venturing and Sea Scouts.

It’s not meant to be read cover to cover. Instead, it’s organized and indexed so you can find answers to your advancement questions quickly. I appreciate that the sometimes-complicated topics covered in the Guide are conveyed in plain English.

The Guide to Advancement is updated every two years to reflect changes to programs, requirements and policies. Changes come from a team of national-level professionals and volunteers. Many of the new sections are the result of frequently asked questions that the Advancement team is answering through new policies.

You can find a complete list of significant changes to the Guide in section 1.0.3.0, beginning on Page 7. But I wanted to pick out 13 of the changes I consider the biggest:

 

1. Merit badge worksheets not allowed for certain requirements

Section: 4.2.0.1

What’s new: This language clarifies the official policy on something I’ve blogged about before: merit badge worksheets. Filling out a worksheet will not be allowed for requirements that use words like “show,” “demonstrate” or “discuss.”

Excerpt from 2015 Guide to Advancement“In Boy Scouting, advancement requirements must be passed as written. If, for example, a requirement uses words like ‘show,’ ‘demonstrate,’ or ‘discuss,’ then that is what Scouts must do. Filling out a worksheet, for example, would not suffice”

2. Scoutmaster conferences should be face-to-face, not online

Section: 4.2.3.5

What’s new: New language says Scoutmaster conferences should be held face-to-face and not online. That means Skype, which is great for some purposes but not as personal as a face-to-face conversation, is out.

Excerpt from 2015 Guide to Advancement: “Scoutmaster conferences are meant to be face-to-face, personal experiences. They relate not only to the Scouting method of advancement, but also to that of ‘association with adults’ (see topic 2.0.0.4, ‘The Methods of Scouting’). Scoutmaster conferences should be held with a level of privacy acceptable under the BSA’s rules regarding Youth Protection. Parents and other Scouts within hearing range of the conversation may influence the Scout’s participation. For this reason, the conferences should not be held in an online setting.”

3. New Cub Scout program now included in the Guide

Sections: Changes throughout the Cub Scout sections, including 4.1.0.0–4.1.1.5

What’s new: Lots. Language now reflects the new Cub Scout program that launches on June 1, 2015.

Excerpt from 2015 Guide to Advancement: “Den leaders, Cubmasters, and their assistants conduct meetings implementing the three steps in Cub Scout advancement: preparation, qualification, and recognition. Four separate den leader guides — one each for the Tiger, Wolf, and Bear programs, and one combined for Webelos and Arrow of Light — explain the mechanics for doing so while helping to maximize advancement.”

4. New Venturing awards outlined

Sections: 4.3.0.0 to 4.3.4.0

What’s new: Almost everything. Last year (2014) saw the introduction of a new Venturing Awards program: Venturing, Discovery, Pathfinder and Summit.

Excerpt from 2015 Guide to Advancement“Four awards make up the Venturing advancement track: Venturing, Discovery, Pathfinder, and Summit, but others also are described below. Venturers have until their 21st birthday to complete their awards.”

5. Sea Scouts aren’t Venturers*

*Updated: This change is pending a vote in May.

Section: 4.4.0.0

What’s new: Sea Scouting, previously considered a “special-interest program carried on as part of Venturing,” is now separated.

Excerpt from 2015 Guide to Advancement“Sea Scouts are not Venturers.” Also: “The Sea Scout Bronze Award is discontinued, and Sea Scouts no longer work on Venturing awards.”

6. Unit merit badge counselor lists shouldn’t be available to Scouts online

Section: 7.0.2.3

What’s new: Units can (and maybe even should) establish a list of registered merit badge counselors. But Scouts should get those names and contact info from a Scoutmaster, not from a list made available online.

Excerpt from 2015 Guide to Advancement“Due to concerns about merit badge counselor privacy, and since Scouts should receive the names and contact information from the Scoutmaster, unit counselor lists should not be made available to Scouts online.”

7. Merit badge instruction should be small in scale

Section: 7.0.3.0

What’s new: Rather than large merit badge classes reminiscent of a boy’s time in high school, the BSA encourages smaller-scale instruction.

Excerpt from 2015 Guide to Advancement“The sort of hands-on interactive experience described here, with personal coaching and guidance, is hardly ever achieved in any setting except when one counselor works directly with one Scout and his buddy, or with a very small group. Thus, this small-scale approach is the recommended best practice for merit badge instruction and requirement fulfillment. Units, districts, and councils should focus on providing the most direct merit badge experiences possible. Large group and Web-based instruction, while perhaps efficient, do not measure up in terms of the desired outcomes with regard to learning and positive association with adults.”

8. Merit badge prerequisites get explained

Section: 7.0.4.11

What’s new: This whole section is new. It explains merit badges that appear to have prerequisites.

Excerpt from 2015 Guide to Advancement“Some merit badges appear to have ‘prerequisites.’ The Emergency Preparedness merit badge, for example, requires the earning of the First Aid merit badge. But since the requirement does not state that First Aid must be earned before beginning work on the other Emergency Preparedness requirements, it is not, by definition, a prerequisite. It is just another requirement. Even though ‘Earn the First Aid Merit badge’ is the first requirement, it need not be the first requirement fulfilled. It is just that the Emergency Preparedness merit badge is not finished until after the First Aid merit badge is completed.”

9. Youth observers aren’t allowed at boards of review

Section: 8.0.1.0

What’s new: No youth should sit in to “observe” a board of review.

Excerpt from 2015 Guide to Advancement“The unit leader may remain in the room, but only to observe, not to participate unless called upon. The number of ‘observers’ at a board of review should otherwise be minimized. The members of the board of review, however, have the authority to exclude the unit leader or any other observers if they believe their presence will inhibit open and forthright discussion. Youth observers are not permitted in boards of review for Boy Scouting advancement.”

10. Guidance offered for boards of review conducted through videoconferencing

Section: 8.0.1.6

What’s new: This whole section is new. It covers boards of review conducted through videoconferencing. Face-to-face boards of review are preferred, but sometimes that’s impossible. So this section helps explain how to run a successful board of review through this format.

Excerpt from 2015 Guide to Advancement“From time to time, however, as Scouts go off to college or the military, or live in very remote locations, for example, it may be virtually impossible to hold in-person boards of review. In those rare situations where it is unreasonable to expect a Scout to travel long distances, or to wait several months, it is permissible to use videoconferencing.”

11. The official Eagle Scout Rank Application is the only one to use

Section: 9.0.1.3

What’s new: A clarification explains that the official Eagle Scout Rank Application (512-728) is the only one Scouts should use.

Excerpt from 2015 Guide to Advancement“Scouts must submit the official Eagle Scout Rank Application, No. 512-728, found at www.scouting.org/advancement. No other form or application is permitted. Special worksheets or spreadsheets have been created in some councils that when filled out electronically produce a completed application. Because the official application changes from time to time, and because submitting out-of-date applications can cause confusion and delays, Scouts must not be required to use these tools. If they do use them, they still must complete and submit the official Eagle Scout Rank Application.”

12. Crowdfunding for Eagle Scout projects explained

Section: 9.0.2.10

What’s new: Fundraising for Eagle Scout projects isn’t required. Plenty of awesome projects are completed without fundraising. But if a Scout needs to raise money, he may use crowdfunding to do so, provided he follows the policies outlined in this section. This is something I’ve blogged about.

Excerpt from 2015 Guide to Advancement“Typical unit fundraisers with which unit leadership is familiar, such as car washes, are the best options. Another alternative, contingent on local council approval, is the use of ‘crowdfunding’ via the Internet. If this method is used, however, then all concerned, from the Scout and his parent or guardian to the unit leader and those approving fundraising at the local council, should be aware that fees may be involved and that fundraising for something like an Eagle project may or may not comply with the website’s terms of service. There can be other issues as well, such as what to do if more — or less — than what is needed is raised. It is important that someone in a position of responsibility reads and understands the website’s ‘fine print.'”

13. Request for Registration Beyond the Age of Eligibility form created

Section: 10.1.0.2

What’s new: This new form is used to register a person who will remain as a youth member beyond the age of eligibility.

Excerpt from 2015 Guide to Advancement“The Request for Registration Beyond the Age of Eligibility, No. 512-935, found in the appendix and at www.scouting.org/advancement, should be used in this process.”

The Guide to Advancement is the official source for administering advancement in helps Scouters understand and implement the advancement programs and procedures of the Boy Scouts of America: Cub Scouting, Boy Scouting, Varsity Scouting, Venturing, and Sea Scouts. Policies and procedures outlined in the Guide to Safe Scouting apply to all BSA activities, including those related to advancement and Eagle Scout service projects.

Additional information and best practices appear in
other official BSA resources such as BSA Advancement Newsthe national Advancement Team’s Twitter feed, and the advancement educational presentations released by the national Advancement Committee. The latest advancement resources can be found on the BSA advancement resources page

Internet advancement allows units to enter youth advancements, awards, and merit badges.

 


RSVP for Cub Scouts Program Updates Training 

Posted by Darlene Scheffler Saturday, April 18, 2015 4:00:00 PM

Cub Scout Program Updates Training - Experience the NEW Cub Scout Adventure Program

Saturday, May 30, 2015, 9:00 am- 11:00 am

Cost: FREE

Cockrell Scout Center, 2225 North Loop West, Houston, TX 77008

 

The Cub Scout program is changing! Come and learn all about the new exciting changes that will go into effect June 1, 2015! Den leaders, Cubmasters, parents, committee members and commissioners are invited!!!

RSVP for Cub Scouts Program Updates Training 


Everything you need to know about the new Cub Scouting program

Adventure ahead! By now, you’ve heard that Cub Scouting is getting a big upgrade on June 1 of this year. We’ve got your road map to the new Cub Scouting program, including what’s changing (and what isn’t), the new adventure loops and tips on how to transition your pack to the revised program.

The Cub Scout motto is “Do Your Best,” but maybe it should be “Embrace Change.” Since Cub Scouting began in 1930, the program has changed frequently. Age limits have dropped. Tigers have been introduced. Lions have gone extinct. The Webelos Scout program has appeared and expanded. Den mothers have become den leaders, and men and women now serve as Cubmasters. But perhaps the biggest changes lie ahead. Effective June 1, the BSA is making sweeping changes to Cub Scouting, changes that promise to make the program more fun and engaging.

 


What’s Not Changing?
Earlier this year, rumors flew around the Internet that the Cub Scout uniform was changing. It’s not.

In fact, most things about Cub Scouting are staying the same, including den and pack structures, age and gender requirements, and the emphasis on fun and doing your best.

Cub Scouting will now have seven methods: Living the Ideals (which incorporates the former Making Character Connections method), Belonging to a Den, Using Advancement, Involving Family and Home, Participating in Activities, Serving Home and Neighborhood, and Wearing the Uniform.

All that’s really changing is how the ideals and advancement methods are implemented.


Updated Ideals
Cub Scouting has come a long way from the 1930s, when Cub Scouts pledged to be “square” (considered a good thing at the time!). Back then, the Cub Scout Promise simply read, “I, [name], promise to do my best to be square and to obey the Law of the Pack.” As part of the revised Cub Scout program, the Cub Scout Promise and the Law of the Pack have been retired, and boys will now learn the Scout Oath and Scout Law. This change emphasizes the unity of the Scouting movement and makes it a bit easier for Cub Scouting to live out Scouting’s mission and vision statements, both of which refer to the Scout Oath and Scout Law. The Cub Scout motto, sign, salute and handshake are not changing. 


What’s an Adventure?
Perhaps the most important word in the revised Cub Scout program is “adventure.” In Cub Scout terms, an adventure is a collection of themed, multidisciplinary activities representing enough engaging content for three den meetings and one pack meeting — about a month’s worth of programming, in other words.

The word “adventure” emphasizes that Cub Scout activities should be fun and should take boys places they’ve never been. The adventures focus on learning by doing instead of learning by listening. Requirements are full of words like build, play, go, find, demonstrate and discover, not words like discuss, learn and share.

The Tiger, Wolf and Bear books contain 19 adventures each, while the Webelos Handbook (which covers two years) contains 27. That means there will be plenty of material for year-round fun, even in the Arrow of Light year.


The Academics and Sports Program
Cub Scouts have been earning belt loops for individual and team sports since 1985 and for academic subjects since 1991, and it’s no doubt they enjoyed the bling. Often, however, earning belt loops detracted from the advancement program as some boys (and leaders) focused on easy belt loops over more challenging — and meaningful — achievements.

With the introduction of the new advancement program, the Academics and Sports Program has been retired. However, many of its best elements have been incorporated into the new adventures, and the new adventure loops ensure that boys’ belts will be as jangly as ever.


Advancement
The old advancement program included a dizzying array of beads, badges, belt loops, arrow points, compass points and activity pins.

Now, each rank will follow the same format. To earn a rank, a boy must complete a mix of seven required and elective adventures.

New Cub Scouts will continue to earn the Bobcat badge before working on other requirements. To earn Bobcat, boys must learn about the Scout Oath and Scout Law and the Cub Scout sign, handshake, motto and salute; they must also complete the exercises described in the pamphlet How to Protect Your Children From Child Abuse: A Parent’s Guide.

Boys receive an adventure loop (previously called belt loops) for each adventure at the Tiger, Wolf and Bear levels, and an adventure pin (worn on the Webelos colors or Webelos cap) for each adventure at the Webelos and Arrow of Light ranks. The recognition items for required adventures are full-color, while the ones for elective adventures are monochromatic. Once a boy completes seven adventures for a given rank, he receives the pocket patch.

To maintain consistency across ranks, boys entering the program in the fifth grade no longer must earn the Webelos badge as a prerequisite for Arrow of Light.


Transitioning to the Revised Program
The revised program goes into effect on June 1. Boys who join on or after that date will complete the new Bobcat requirements and then start on the appropriate rank for their age group (Tiger, Wolf, Bear, Webelos or Arrow of Light). Similarly, returning Cub Scouts will move to the next rank in the revised program when their program year starts. (The transition works a little differently in packs chartered to the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. See the guide posted atscouting.org/programupdates for details.)

Boys who have earned the Webelos badge and are moving to Arrow of Light this summer or fall have two options:

  1. they may continue to work out of the current handbook and complete the old Arrow of Light requirements, or
  2. they may begin using the new Webelos Handbook for Arrow of Light.

If they choose option 2, they must complete the four required adventures; their three electives may come from the new adventures or from activity badges they earned under the old program but did not use to fulfill Webelos rank requirements.


Introducing Ethan
Boys are aspirational by nature. They long to become like their big brothers, their older cousins, and the kids who are a grade or two ahead of them in school.

Starting this year, many Cub Scouts will aspire to be Ethan.

Ethan is a new character who appears in all four Cub Scout handbooks and speaks directly to the reader about what he’s been doing in Scouting. In each handbook, Ethan is a year or two older than the boys he’s addressing. (In theTiger Handbook, he’s a Wolf, while in theWebelos Handbook, he’s a Boy Scout.)

Ethan introduces each of the required adventures, shares tips from his own experiences and previews what boys can look forward to as they progress in Scouting. While Ethan is a good Scout, he’s not a perfect one. He struggles to master the square knot, he gets scared by a spooky ghost story, and he forgets the jelly for PB&J sandwiches. But he always has fun and is always ready for his next adventure.


New for 2015: Den Leader Guides
The revised program comes complete with four printed den leader guides that complement the youth handbooks. More comprehensive than the old Den & Pack Meeting Resource Guide, these books offer the following resources for each adventure:

  • The rationale for the adventure
  • Takeaways for Cub Scouts (learning objectives)
  • A list of the adventure requirements
  • Planning and implementation notes
  • Detailed meeting plans (including supply lists and handouts)

Meeting preparation should be easier because the guides are self-contained — there’s no need to search through other publications for games or song lyrics, for example. Leaders who pilot-tested the adventures found that it took them about 45 minutes to prepare for an hourlong meeting.


What About Akela?
In the revised Cub Scout program, Akela will still be a special term for any leader, and the Cub Scout sign will still resemble the attentive ears of a wolf. Cub Scouting’s use of characters from The Jungle Book will be mentioned in the youth handbooks but, beyond that, the TC, Akela and Baloo characters won’t show up. (Keep in mind that The Jungle Book was published in 1894 and that most people’s frame of reference is the Disney movie that came out 48 years ago.)


Quick Links


Breaking News

New Pack Meeting Plans Available Now!
Pack meeting plans for the 2015-2016 and 2016-2017 Cub Scouting years are now available! From the Cubmaster’s Minute to resource lists, you’ll find everything you need to lead fun and engaging pack meetings! And they support the new Cub Scouting program, too! Click here to download the plans.

Updated Requirements for Cub Scout Awards
The requirements for the National Den Award, National Summertime Pack Award, Cub Scout World Conservation Award, and the Cub Scout Outdoor Activity Award have been revised to reflect the new Cub Scouts program launching June 1, 2015. Click here for details .

New Cub Scouting Images Available Now!
Looking to update your presentations with new graphics? Click here for images such as: the new Tiger logo, new adventure loop and pin icons, new youth handbook covers, new leader resource covers, and more! Click here.

Purchasing Adventure Loops and Pins for Recognition
The new adventure insignia (belt loops and pins) will be available for purchase in Scout Shops as immediate recognition devices. No advancement report required. Purchase of rank badges continues to require signed advancement reports. Click here for policy statement .

Day Camp Guidance – New Cub Scout Program Launch
If you’ve planned your 2015 Day Camp using the current Academics and Sports program (retiring as the new program transitions June 1), no need to change course. Work with your local scout shop to make sure the needed insignia from the current program are still available and in their inventory. Click here for further guidance .

Transition in LDS Chartered Units – New Cub Scout Program
Need additional guidance on transitioning from the current to the new Cub Scout program in LDS units? Click here for details on making a smooth transition .


Orientation Videos

Exciting changes are coming to the Cub Scouting program that will make it simpler to execute for unit leaders and more fun for boys! Check out the videos below outlining the changes.


Supplemental Roundtable Content

To help prepare unit leaders for the new Cub Scouting program launching June 1, supplemental roundtable content has been developed to replace or supplement the current sessions listed as "Cub Scout Interest Topics" for January–July 2015. 

Available installments are posted below.

January – Program Support for Den Leaders
Topic Guide 
Presentation Materials 

February – Advancement
Topic Guide 
Presentation Materials 

March – Program Planning
Topic Guide 
Presentation Materials 
Worksheet 

April – New Pack Meeting Plans
Topic Guide 
Presentation Materials 

May – Aquatic Adventures
Topic Guide 
Presentation Materials 

Additional content will be posted the last week of each month as follows:

June – Campfire Programs
July – Resources for Packs and Den Leaders


Latest Information

Find more information at scouting.org/programupdates

 

Register for Day Camp 

Posted by Darlene Scheffler Sunday, March 15, 2015 8:05:00 AM

Cub Scout Day/Twilight Camp is a council camp hosted by districts for Scouts entering 1st – 5th grade for the 2015-2016 school year. Scouts earn rank advancements, learn new skills, play sports and games, make crafts, shoot BB guns and archery, but most of all have fun. Scouts can attend any district’s camp that best suits their schedule. Participants receive a t-shirt and patch. Advancements offered at Day Camp supplements the exciting program offered at Resident Camp.

At camp, Cub Scouts will salute those heroes who help keep us safe and secure each and every day. Can only adults be heroes? Heroes are often ordinary kids who did something out of the ordinary! Sometimes a hero is obvious, the policeman who risks his life to protect us from violence or the fireman who pulls people out of burning buildings. Some people around us seem like regular people, but they are heroes because they used to be soldiers in the military and served our country to keep us free. Heroes are all around us. You never know when or where emergencies will arise. Scouting teaches us how to handle these situations. We don’t expect to get hurt, and don’t expect to need first aid, but we are prepared just in case. Do Your Best! One person can make a difference. One person who helps can change someone’s world. Maybe one day the hero will be you or your Cub Scout.

Free, customizable placemats are available to use as den and pack meetings to help promote day camp.

There are 27 camps offered around the council at various times. Registered Scouts can attend any camp. Use the Google map to find a camp near you.

District Registration 2015 Date Time Location Contact
Aldine Pathfinder   June 8-12 5:00 - 8:00 pm Aldine High School Caroline Rudisill
Antares   June 8-12 5:00 - 8:00 pm   Malik Nelson
Arrowmoon Register June 15-19 8:00 - 3:00 pm Camp Howdy Allyson Sweeney
Aquila Register June 1-5 6:00 - 9:15 pm Longfellow Elementary Mary Welch
Bayshore Register June 8-12 4:30 - 9:00 pm Lomax Arena Thadd Bowers
Big Cypress Register for AM Session
Register for PM Session
June 8-11
AM Session: 8:30am - 2:00pm
PM Session: 3:00 - 8:30 pm
Cy-Fair Exhibition Center
Angela Teague
Brahman Register June 29-July 2 8:00 am - 3:00 pm El Campo American Legion Denise Kopecky
Brazos Register June 9-12 2:00 - 8:30 pm Fort Bend County Fairgrounds Jennifer Carlisle
Copperhead Register June 8-11 3:00 - 8:30pm Houston Farm and Ranch Raphael Poirrier
David Crockett Register June 9-12 8:30 am - 3:30 pm Camp Brosig Dee Dee Michel
Eagle Trail Register June 8-12 4:30 - 9:00 pm Lomax Arena Thadd Bowers
Flaming Arrow Register June 23-25 1:30 - 8:00 pm A.V. "Bull" Sallas park John Carter
George Strake Register June 15-19 8:30 am - 1:30 pm, M-Th
6:00 pm - 9:00 pm, Fr
Carl Barton Junior Park Lorie Thornton
Iron Horse Register June 16-19 1:00 - 8:00 pm Northside Christian Church Leana Skinner
Mustang Register June 8-12 9:00 am - 2:00 pm Houston Farm and Ranch Jennifer Mikes
North Star   June 16-19 12:30 - 6:30 pm Cornerstone Church  Angie Lopez
Orion Register June 16-19 2:00 - 8:00 pm Spring Creek Park Melissa Spears
Phoenix Register June 22-26 7:45 am - 3:15 pm Burroughs Park Albert Robb
Raven Register June 10-13 5:45 - 9:15 pm LDS Church in Baytown Valerie Richardson
Skyline Register June 15-18 5:30 - 8:30 pm St. Pius X High School Colleen Tautfest
Soaring Eagle Register for AM session
Register for PM session
June 9-12 1: 8:00 am - 1:30 pm
2: 3:00 - 8:30 pm
Cypress Bible Church Bobby Ausmus
Tall Timbers Register June 8-11 2:00 pm - 8:00 pm Grace Crossing Church Clysta Maggart
Tatanka   June 8-12 5:30 - 9:00 pm LDS Church, 3450 S Dairy Ashford Shannon Proffit
Texas Skies Register June 15-19 9:00 am - 3:00 pm Houston Farm and Ranch Steve Slagel
Thunder Wolf Register June 9-12 3:00 - 8:00 pm LDS Church, 8333 Scanlan Trace Abraham Kurien
Twin Bayou Register June 8-11 6:00 - 9:15 pm   Jenny Johnson
W.L. Davis Register June 10-12 5:00 - 8:30 pm Gregg Elementary School Doris Thornton

 

Camps are operated and licensed under the guidelines of the Boy Scouts of America National Camp Standards and the Texas Department of State Health Services Youth Camp Program Regulations.

 

 

 

For Questions Contact:

Leslie Melton
Council Day Camp Chair
 Leslie.Melton@sbcglobal.net

Geno Aguilar
 (713) 756-3304
 Geno.Aguilar@scouting.org

 

Vincent Manning
Day Camp Professional Advisor
 (713) 756-3380
 Vincent.Manning@scouting.org

Upcoming Scout Days 

Posted by Darlene Scheffler Monday, January 19, 2015 12:18:00 PM

 

All-Earth Ecobot Challenge (STEM)

Saturday May 16, 2015 from 8 AM-5 PM
NRG Center, Hall E

Ecobot Challenge is an event where hundreds of Ecobot teams of 5th- 8th grade students from surrounding counties compete using robots and computer technology to simulate a variety of scientific challenges. Scouts are invited to observe the All-Earth Ecobot Challenge for free. 

Using autonomous robotics and computer technology, Ecobot teams solve simulated challenges in energy exploration, transportation, technological innovation, medical research and environmental sustainability. In addition to sharpening their knowledge of mathematics and physics, Ecobot participants learn valuable life lessons in teamwork, time management, presentation  planning  and marketing. Interaction with professionals from a variety of related fields also helps participants to connect school to career and envision a future that employs their unique talents.

Scouts are invited to form teams and participate in the upcoming 2016 season. Visit the Ecobotchallenge.com website, or email jpaneitz@gmail.com for more information.

Scouters are needed to assist in judging these competitions, as well as helping with other aspects of the competitions. This is also an opportunity for Scouters to get project and/or program ideas for Scouts. The All-Earth Ecobot Challenge needs judges to help encourage this generation of students to continue their passion for scientific research.

 


National Weather Service Skywarn Classes

The National Weather Service Houston/Galveston office offers free Skywarn classroom and webinar training courses on how to spot and report severe weather. Scouters are invited to attend. Upcoming training sessions are posted here.

 

 


Boy Scout Emergency Preparedness Merit Badge Workshop

June 6, 2015

Boy Scouts can work on requirements for the Emergency Preparedness Merit Badge at a special Scout workshop at the George R Brown Convention Center from 9:30 am to 2:30 pm. The presenter is a registered merit badge counselor who partners with several agencies including the National Weather Service. Flyer

Register for Hurricane Workshop

 


Houston Museum of Natural Science

The Houston Museum of Natural Science offers a variety of classes for Scouts.

  • Tigers, Wolves, and Bears can earn the Astronomy, Geology, Science, and Weather Belt Loops and Pins in 2-hour classes. Two classes can be taken in one day and entrance to the general exhibits is included. Classes are offered through the school year on Saturdays.
  • Engineer, Forester, Geologist, Naturalist and Scientist activity badges can be earned by Webelos in two-hour classes on Saturdays through the school year. The Engineer, Into the Woods, Earth Rocks, Into the Wild, and Science adventure badges will be introduced in the summer and fall of 2015 . Two classes can be taken in one day and entrance to the general exhibits is included.
  • Boy Scouts and Webelos can attend the museum's Summer Scout Academy! A total of 28 different merit badges are offered, including four Eagle Scout required badges during summer classes. Two or three badges with similar topics are grouped together in each week-long class. Registration opens in February.
  • Tigers, Wolves, Bears, and Webelos can spend the night at the museum during the Scout Adventure Night!  Scouts can all have an exclusive adventure through the Museum exhibit halls, with activities and a special program in the Burke Baker Planetarium, where Scouts have a clear night adventure under the stars!

The Health Museum

The Health Museum offers a variety of classes for Scouts. Private classes can also be scheduled for groups of 10 or more Scouts on a first-come, first-served basis.

  • Webelos can work on the Forester, Geologist, Traveler, Citizen, Readyman, Scientist, Fitness, and Aquanaut badges.
  • Boy Scouts can work on 21 different merit badges.

 


Houston Arboretum & Nature Center

The Houston Arboretum & Nature Center offers a variety of classes for Scouts. Scouts investigate the nature sanctuary with a naturalist and learn about the fascinating ecology of the forest. All of our Scout programs are conducted by staff naturalists and use our nature sanctuary as a field laboratory for hands-on explorations!

  • Tigers, Wolves and Bears can work on some outdoor advancements during their Cub Scout Workshops.
  • Webelos can work on the Naturalist and Forester badges
  • Boy Scouts can work on the Bird Study merit badge and conduct Eagle Scout projects.

Houston Zoo

The Houston Zoo offers a spend the night at the zoo for a unique, after-hours experience which includes interactive activities, touchable animals, pizza dinner, Scout advancements on certain nights, and a continental breakfast!  
 


Weather Center Houston

The Weather Center Houston offers the Boy Scout Weather merit badge.


Armand Bayou Nature Center

The Armand Bayou Nature Center offers a variety of classes for Scouts. 

  • Tigers, Wolves and Bears can work on several outdoor advancements.
  • Webelos can work on the Naturalist and Forester badge.


Watch for additional Scout Days to be announced soon.

For more information, contact:

Shane Burks
Marketing/Communications Director
(713) 756-3301
 Shane.Burks@shac.org

 

 

 


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Summer Camp Registration is Open 

Posted by Darlene Scheffler Wednesday, October 29, 2014 9:39:00 AM

Cub Scout Resident Camp is a three-night campout at Bovay Scout Ranch for Cub Scouts entering the first through fifth grade the following school year.  From Cub Scout skills to rank advancements, these camps are full of fun and learning. 

 

El Rancho Cima, located 15 miles west of San Marcos, TX has a variety of summer programs for Boy Scouts, Varsity Scouts, Venturers and Sea Scouts. The camp is 2,680 acres of mountainous terrain covered by an umbrella of cedars and hardwoods. Boy Scouts can earn merit badges, learn and practice their Scouting skills, follow the patrol method and work towards advancement, while having a fun in the Texas Hill Country.  Activities include swimming, climbing and even a high adventure program to challenge older Scouts.

  • Cockrell River Summer Camp is located on the banks of the Blanco River among native pecan and cypress trees. During summer camp, aquatics are the biggest draw to Cockrell River Camp, including swimming, canoeing, kayaking, and fishing, just to name a few.
  • Horseshoe Bend Summer Camp is held in the shadows of Sentinel Peak and Fortress Mountain. During summer camp, Horseshoe Bend is the hub of the western program. Activities include horseback riding, backpacking, climbing, swimming, and much more.
  • Rough Riders is a high adventure summer camp experience. Senior Boy Scouts, Venturers and adults will experience zip lining, a horseback trek, whitewater adventure, rock climbing, rappelling and much more.
  • Super Troop is an opportunity for Boy Scouts to attend an extra week of Boy Scout summer camp, or to attend camp individually if a Boy Scout can’t attend camp with his unit. Limited spots are available.
     

Cockrell River Camp

Cockrell River Camp has 14 campsites shaded by 75-year old native pecan and black walnut trees. The Blanco River provides campers with 1.5 miles of unique swimming, canoeing, rowing, and fishing opportunities. A state-of-the-art .22 rifle and five-stand shotgun range, and 40 foot climbing and rappelling tower, make for an unforgettable experience.

Cockrell River Camp is located in El Rancho Cima, just two miles from the main gate. The breath-taking views are endless, as you make your way down towards your campsite on the Blanco River. Each campsite has its own spectacular view of the river. The Blanco River provides unique swimming, canoeing, rowing, and kayaking opportunities. On a hot summer's day, relief is just steps in the 68 degree year-round Blanco River.

The rifle, shotgun, and archery range will provide any novice shooter a chance to learn and become an expert marksman and gives experienced shooters a new challenge. 


Register for 2015 Summer Camp
Cockrell River Camp 

Week 1 6/14 - 6/20/2015 Register
Week 2 6/21 - 6/27/2015 Register
Week 3 6/28 - 7/4/2015 Register
Week 4 7/5 - 7/11/2015 Register
Week 5 7/12 - 7/18/2015 Register
Week 6 7/19 - 7/25/2015 Register
     
Year Round Weekend Camping Register

 
 


Horseshoe Bend

Walter Scout Camp at Horseshoe Bend has a variety of programs including a range with eight rifle shooting stations and two shotgun shooting stations, horse riding, and numerous hiking trails. Horseshoe Bend has an exciting program that Scouts and leaders won't forget.

Walter Scout Camp at Horseshoe Bend is located a half mile inside the main gate of El Rancho Cima. At Walter Scout Camp at Horseshoe Bend, life is a little more laid back, as in the days of the Old West. Transportation is a little different from city life, with over 40 horses from which to choose. Scouts may encounter may cowboys who will always greet you with a friendly "Howdy."

During summer camp, Walter Scout Camp at Horseshoe Bend has a variety of unique programs that include horseback riding, rodeo, trips to the meadow, and of course, the spectacular hike to Sentinel Peak. The merit badge program includes shooting sports, ecology, conservation, aquatics (pool only), handicrafts and much more. 



Register for 2015 Summer Camp
Walter Scout Camp at Horseshoe Bend

Week 1 6/14 - 6/20/2015 Register
Week 2
(LDS Week)
6/22 - 6/27/2015 Register
Week 3 6/28 - 7/4/2015 Register
Week 4 7/5 - 7/11/2015 Register
     
Year Round Weekend Camping Register


 


Rough Riders

Rough Riders is a high adventure summer camp experience for older Scouts with activities such as zip lining, horseback riding, water adventures, rock climbing, rappelling and much more. Older Scouts can attend Rough Riders while their unit is attending summer camp. Participants can also sign up individually. 

Discover some of the forgotten land of El Rancho Cima during the Rough Rider program, and spend a week of summer on the historic Devil's Backbone. Rough Riders is an experience designed to challenge the senior members of your troop and crew and prepare them for other high adventure base camps. At the Hamman High Adventure Base at Iron Wheel Mesa, troops, teams and crews will have the advantage of going through the ever growing COPE course which includes:

  • Calamity Jane - a 65 foot climbing tower with a 1,500 foot zip-line
  • Little Sure Shot - a 2,000 foot zip-line ride over the Blanco River
  • 4 high elements
  • 6 low elements
  • Work on leadership and teamwork skills

From base camp on the mesa, participants will take a horseback trek down custom trails to and from three back country sites and cookout and camp overnight and:

  • Shoot black power rifles at Rocky Gulch
  • Experience the heritage of El Rancho Cima's early inhabitants through activities such as tomahawk throwing at Homestead Meadows
  • Learn about metal working at the forge, located right on the Blanco River

Register for 2015 Rough Riders

Week 1 6/14/15 - 6/20/2015 Register
Week 2 6/21/15 - 6/27/2015 Register
Week 3 6/28/15 - 7/4/2015 Register
Week 4 7/5/15 - 7/11/2015 Register
 

Cub Scout Resident Camp

Resident Camp is a three-night campout at Bovay Scout Ranch for Cub Scouts entering the first through fifth grade the following school year.  From Cub Scout skills to rank advancements, these camps are full of fun and learning. Cub Scouts attending resident camp are also encouraged to register for day camp, as the advancements offered at Resident Camp add to those offered at Day / Twilight Camp.

Resident Camp includes activities such as: seeking treasure in the Lost Mine, archeological quest at the dinosaur dig, high speed pedal action at the BMX bike track, Robin Hood style adventure at the archery range, marksmanship at Fort Bluebell’s BB gun range, action at the K.S. “Bud” Adams Sports Field, pow wow at the Indian Village, exploring camp at the Nature Center, and splashing in the water at the David Weekley Family Water Park.

Resident Camp Registration

Register Session Date Session Time
Session 1 July 8 - 11, 2015 Wed at 2 pm - Sat at 11 am
Session 2 July 12 - 15, 2015 Sun at 2 pm - Wed at 11 am
Session 3 July 15 - 18, 2015 Wed at 2 pm - Sat at 11 am
Session 4 July 19 - 22, 2015 Sun at 2 pm - Wed at 11 am
Session 5 July 22 - 25, 2015 Wed at 2 pm - Sat at 11 am
Session 6 July 26 - 29, 2015 Sun at 2 pm - Wed at 11 am
Session 7 July 29 - August 1, 2015 Wed at 2 pm - Sat at 11 am
2225 N Loop West
Houston Texas 77008-1311
(Local) 713-659-8111
(Fax) 713-865-9137