Blog Post List

Popcorn Sign-Up 

Posted by Darlene Scheffler Tuesday, July 10, 2018 9:15:00 AM

Hundreds of thousands of dollars go back to the Scouting program in the Sam Houston Area Council as a result of the annual popcorn sale. 73% of all dollars collected during the sale support local Scouting. The popcorn sale is a way for a Scout to support his or her way through the various activities during the year. There are three options to sell popcorn: traditional take order sales, sell online to friends and family out of town and show-n-sell. For more information, contact your district popcorn kernel or district executive.

Sign-up for Traditional and Online Sales

Why Sell?

• Increase your unit and council income – 73% stays in the local area.
• Scouts pay for their way for various Scouting programs and activities.
• Scouts learn life lessons by earning their own way. To 
• There are loads of incentives to motivate Scouts: cool prizes, $600 club, $1800 club.
• Ordering has never been easier than with the Trail's End app.
Videos and resources help Scouts learn how to be successful.


Ways to Sell Popcorn

There are three options to sell popcorn: traditional take order sales, sell online to friends and family out of town and show-and-sell. All sales count towards prizes.

1. Take Order Sales 

Take order sales are the most traditional way to sell popcorn. Scouts go door-to-door with the take order form received from your leader after unit kick off on August 15 through October 31 2018. Customers choose the product(s) they wish to buy and writes the order on the order form. Scouts should collect the money when the popcorn is ordered (checks should be made out to the unit). Orders can be taken on an order form or via the Trail's End app (which accepts credit cards). Popcorn will be picked up by units on November 17, 2018.

Sign-up for Traditional and Online Sales 

2. Online Popcorn Sales 

Selling online is the best way to sell to friends and family who live far away. Online sales count toward Scout rewards including the $650 club, $1800 club and scholarship program. Participants can send emails to friends and family asking them to purchase products online. The email includes a link allowing them to begin shopping right away. Customers can pay with a credit card, and the products are shipped directly to the customer. The advantages of online sales are that the Scout doesn't have to collect money or deliver products. Online sales run from August 1 to November 17, 2018.

3. Show-n-Sell

Show-n-sell is similar to take order sales, except Scouts have the popcorn in hand to sell to customers. All units are eligible to participate if they agree to the terms stated in the commitment order form. Dens, packs or troops can request permission to sell in front of a retail store or chartered organization. Units must agree to use show-n-sell to grow and not replace traditional take order sales.There are four bundle options that can net units between $500 and $3,600. Order and sell multiple bundles to increase unit profits! There is little risk as any unsold popcorn is rolled into traditional sales.

Show-n-sell popcorn is picked up on August 19, 2017. For pick up times and location, contact the district popcorn kernel. The show-n-sell campaign runs from August 18 to October 1, 2018.

Sign-up for Show-n-Sale 

Popcorn Blitz Day

Blitz Day is a designated day where units are encouraged to sell popcorn during take-order as a group by canvassing areas in their neighborhood. Scouts that meet the items sold count indicated by each date will qualify for entry into the drawing for one of three GoPro Hero3+ Silver Edition.

  • September 29, 2018 – Sell a total of 20 total traditional items by 9/30/17 and then enter the drawing.
  • October 13, 2018 – Sell a total of 40 total traditional items by 10/14/17 and then enter the drawing.
  • October 27, 2018 – Sell a total of 60 total traditional items by 10/30/17 and then enter the drawing.

The winner will be drawn and announced on Facebook the following week. 

Note: Scouts are not required to participate in Blitz Day to enter the drawing. If the required number of items are sold and met by the deadline, a Scout may submit an entry for the drawing.

Products

Chocolate Lover's Collection (tin) $60
Cheese Lovers' Collection (tin) $35
Salted Caramel Popcorn (tin) $30
Chocolatey Caramel Crunch (tin) $30
Premium Caramel Corn (tin) $25
Kettle Corn (microwave) $20
Unbelievable Butter (microwave) $20
White Cheddar Cheese Tin (tin) $25
Jalapeno Cheddar Cheese $15
Classic Caramel Corn $10

Military Donation

The military donation allows customers to support the military and Scouting at the same time. Customers can choose to donate $50 or $30 worth of popcorn to men and women in the military, their families and veterans' organizations. There are no shipping and handling charges associated with military donations. Over 2,000 tons of popcorn treats have been shipped to hundreds of locations around the world! Military donations count toward Scout rewards.

Since customers who purchase a military donation don't receive the product in exchange for payment, the purchase should be 100% tax deductible. As always, recommend that the customer check the tax laws with their tax professional, as tax laws often change. 

 

Scout Prizes

Did you know that units that utilize the council prize program sell an average of 6% more than units that go with the cash option? Youth are motivated by prizes and the ability to work towards a goal. The prize selection is sure to have something for every youth in your unit. 

2018 Prizes

Trail's End Scholarship Program

Scouts who sell at least $2,500 (online, face-to-face, or combination) in any calendar year will have 6% of their Qualified Product Sales count towards their own Trail's End Scholarship.* Once enrolled, 6% of their sales each year will go towards the scholarship*. Reporting of sales is not automatic, and forms must be submitted to Trail's End each year following the guidelines below. Scouts only have to hit the $2,500 minimum one time, and don't forget online sales count!

Learn More

Increase Sales

Units who motivate their Scouts to increase their take-order sales a minimum of $700 over 2016 sales will receive one $100 Amazon gift card. The card can be used for a random Scout drawing for Scouts who made a take-order sale.

Top Sellers Recognitions

The council's top three sellers will be recognized with a trophy and an Amazon gift card ($600 for first place, $400 for second place, $200 for third place). The top three sellers in the council and all $1800 club members are invited to attend the council's Top Seller Bash on January 6, 2018.

Sales Level Reward
$1,000 Movie Experience
$1,500 $50 Amazon eGift card + Movie + Soccer Game
$2,500 $150 Amazon eGift card + Movie + Soccer Game
$3,500 $250 Amazon eGift card + Movie + Soccer Game
$5,500 $400 Amazon eGift card + Movie + Soccer Game
$10,000 $1,000 Amazon eGift card + Movie + Soccer Game
$15,000 $1,500 Amazon eGift card + Movie + Soccer Game
$20,000 $2,000 Amazon eGift card + Movie + Soccer Game

Move Experience: Two tickets for the Scout and a parent/guardian) to the Lego Move 2 (for the weekend of February 8, 2019), plus two drinks and popcorn

Soccer Game: Two tickets to the Houston Dynamo or Dash (3 games to choose from) for the Scout and a parent/guardian. Tickets are provided electronically. Families can buy additional tickets to the same game.

Resources

 

      

 

 

Kick-off / Distribution / Contacts

 

Popcorn Kick-off

August 14, 2018   

 At the popcorn kick-off, unit leaders will receive, sales materials, training, and leader tools. Every unit should send at least one leader. For more information, contact your district popcorn kernel or district executive. Units do not need to register for the kick-off; units only need to sign-up to sell popcorn.

 

District
(click for website)

District Popcorn Contact 
(right click for email address)

Kick-off 
8/4/18

Distribution
11/17/18
(not for show-n-sale)

Distribution
Location

Aldine Pathfinder  

Alma Watson

     

Aquila

Jennifer Kelley

     

Arrowmoon

Luis Guzman

     

Big Cypress

Michael Mueller

     

Brahman

Melissa Locke

     

Brazos

Janet Potts

     

Copperhead

Lynn Mackay

     

David Crockett 

Jennifer Michalik

     
Exploring Michelle Phillips      

Flaming Arrow

Lisa Munoz

     

George Strake

Amy Drinkwater

     

Iron Horse 

Tina Adams

     
Learning for Life  Michelle Phillips      

Mustang

Kim Healy

     

North Star

Jennifer DiAngelo

     

Orion

Carol Tatay Bland

     

Phoenix

Montye Holmes

     

Raven

Kindra Ellis

   

 

San Jacinto

Beanye Mrozinski      

Skyline

David Williames

     

Soaring Eagle

Belinda Stockwell

     

Tall Timbers

Mary Welch

     

Tatanka

Ana Diaz

     

Texas Skies

Karey Fellers

   

 

Thunder Wolf

Angi Hillin

     

Twin Bayou

Christopher Gray 

     

W. L. Davis

Shironda White

     

Council Contacts

Tess Wall
Popcorn Unit Specialist
 (713) 824-0858
 scoutertess@gmail.com

Tony Hensdill
Popcorn Project Coordinator
 (713) 756-3374
 popcorn@shac.org


Important Dates 

August 1 - October 31, 2018 Online popcorn sales period
August 1, 2018 Show-n-sell orders due
August 14, 2018 Popcorn kickoff for unit popcorn kernel
August 18, 2018 Show-n-sell distribution; sales begin
After unit kick off through October 31, 2018 Traditional take-order popcorn sales period
August 18, 2018 Show-n-sell unit popcorn pick up and distribution (see district website for location)
August 18 - October 1, 2018 Show-n-sell sales period
September 29, 2018 Popcorn Blitz Day (goal: sell 20 traditional sales items total)
October 1, 2018 Show-n-sell payments processed
October 13, 2018 Popcorn Blitz Day (goal: sell 40 traditional sales items total)
October 27, 2018 Popcorn Blitz Day (goal: sell 60 traditional sales items total)
November 1, 2018 by 4:00 pm Unit orders due online by 4:00 pm (scouting.trails-end.com, click order popcorn)
November 17, 2018  Popcorn distribution (see district website for location)
November 17, 2018  Unit top sellers form due to district (at distribution center)
November 17, 2018  Unit payments due to district (at distribution center)
November 17, 2018   $1800 club membership form due 
January 5, 2018 Top Seller's BASH (for council top three sellers and $1800 club members)
February 15, 2018 Online commissions issued and mailed to the committee chair on file for the unit


Contacts

For more information, contact your district popcorn kernel or district executive.

Tess Wall
Popcorn Unit Specialist
 (713) 824-0858
 scoutertess@gmail.com

Tony Hensdill
Popcorn Project Coordinator
 (713) 756-3374
 popcorn@shac.org

 

 

 

 

YPT2 - Important Updates 

Posted by Darlene Scheffler Sunday, May 13, 2018 12:00:00 AM

Six Things You Need to Know About Youth Protection Training 2 (YPT2)

Over the past 108 years, the Boy Scouts of America have instilled the values of the Scout Oath and Law in millions of youth, preparing them to make ethical decisions while facilitating a secure environment for their development. Safe Scouting practices and youth protection are at the heart of the Boy Scouts of America and the Sam Houston Area Council's mission.

In order to continue providing a safe and secure environment for today’s youth, the Boy Scouts of America have developed a new version of the Youth Protection Training program taken by all volunteer and staff. The new training, which is fully supported and endorsed by the Sam Houston Area Council, launched to the public this month.

Video

Here are five things you need to know about the launch of the new YPT2:

1. What is Youth Protection Training 2?

Youth Protection Training 2 (YPT2) is the new youth protection training for the Boy Scouts of America that covers all programs within the Boy Scouts of America. YPT2 is a comprehensive training that covers a variety of best practices for preventing, identifying and dealing with abuse.

2. Who is required to be YPT2 trained?

BSA requires all registered adult leaders and volunteers and any adult who will attend an activity that lasts 72 hours or longer to be YPT2 trained. The updated course debuted in February 2018; if you took Youth Protection Training prior to that, you’ll need to complete the updated course by Oct. 1, 2018.

Update (3/31/18):

We have just been informed by BSA National Council that the State of Texas has ruled that BSA's new online Youth Protection Training will satisfy state law regarding all licensed youth camps.

This means: **If you have completed the new BSA online Youth Protection Training course on or after March 13, 2018, you no longer need to take a classroom-facilitated version of the course in order to camp with your unit at a licensed camp (camps of four or more days).

** If you have not yet taken the new BSA online Youth Protection Training course, you must do so by October 1, 2018... or you won't be able to recharter with your unit at year-end.

3. Is there a deadline for adult volunteers to acquire YPT2 training?

Yes, all registered leaders must complete the new YPT2 training or the classroom facilitated YPT course by October 1, 2018.

YPT courses taken before February 1, 2018, will not count.

4. How do I complete YPT2 training?

YPT2 can be accessed by logging into my.scouting.org. Once logged in, click on the youth protection logo and continue to follow the prompts until the training begins. YPT2 includes three learning modules followed by a 25-question assessment; total time to complete is 60-75 minutes. Here’s a PDF that outlines the steps.

5. What are the changes?

Over the decades, the Boy Scouts of America has been a leader in developing training and policies designed to keep young people safe. Over time, these policies have become standard with organizations across the nation. Now, the Boy Scouts of America is releasing fully updated training to further strengthen our ability to protect youth. 

Updated Youth Protection Training, including insights from experts and survivors and the latest strategies for recognizing and preventing major forms of abuse. This is the designated Youth Protection Training for all adults. All volunteers must take the new training by October 1, 2018, no matter when they took the previous training.

Changes include:

  • An expanded ScoutsFirst Helpline to aid volunteers and families in addressing potentially dangerous situations.
  • Unlimited counseling and support for healing to anyone who has ever been abused in Scouting.
  • Youth Protection Training for youth members available in 2019.

In addition to updated training, we recently announced new policies to ensure compliance with mandatory training requirements, including:

  • As of January 1, 2018, no new leader can be registered without first completing youth protection training.
  • As of January 1, 2018, no council, regional, or national leader will be allowed to renew their registration if they are not current on their Youth Protection Training.
  • As of September 1, 2017, no unit may re-charter without all leaders being current on their Youth Protection Training. Registrars no longer have the ability to approve charters without full compliance.
  • Effective June 1, 2018, adults accompanying a Scouting unit who are present at the activity for 72 total hours or more must be registered as a leader, including completion of a criminal background check and Youth Protection Training. The 72 hours need not be consecutive.

With these changes, and many more outlined in the documents listed below, as well as the overview video, we will continue to build a safe environment for our youth. 

As an advocate and champion for youth protection in Scouting movement, I encourage you to watch the video, become familiar with the resource documents, take the training and spread the word. 

We realize the Oct 1 training deadline will be a challenge for some – but the safety of our children is too important to delay. 

6. What’s updated in this Youth Protection course?

  • Videos from survivors of abuse. “In developing this training, we discussed whether or not to include survivor videos,” Johnson said. “It was the right decision. Their testimony is powerful and highlights how predators work and the tragic impact like nothing else.”
  • Video interviews with psychologists and law enforcement professionals who discuss the root causes of abuse, how to recognize it and how to respond.
  • Three all-new training modules and a test.

Resources

Contact

If you have any questions about the changes to Youth Protection, please contact the Council Youth Protection Champion, James Yaklin.

 

 

Camp Development March 2018 Update 

Posted by Darlene Scheffler Tuesday, March 27, 2018 10:00:00 AM

Camp Development for the 21st Century

March 2018 Update

The Sam Houston Area Council (“council”) has the vision to become a leader in camping by having first-class facilities that are well maintained and provide safe, fun and educational outdoor programs for our Scouts.  In 2012, the council approved a new Camping Vision Statement: Exemplary, Sustainable Outdoor Experiences and Creative Learning for 21st Century Youth and Their Leaders.”

To achieve this vision, the council has a properties master plan.  This plan is modified from time to time based on need and situational events.

In developing the plan, the following are key principles that drive decisions:

  • Exemplary – first-class facilities, maintained to meet today’s standards;
  • Program Impact – delivering high-quality programs associated with quality facilities – basically driving towards achieving the goals of the Camping Vision Statement;
  • Impact – maximizing the use and access based on location to our camps by as many Scouts as possible;
  • Efficiency – being a good steward of resources and eliminating redundancy; and
  • Sustainable – a long-term solution for ongoing operating and maintenance costs and the long-term maintenance of facilities.

Plans

The current plan includes the development of new camps including the new Tellepsen Scout Camp at Bovay Scout Ranch (near Navasota, Texas) that opened in 2015, the new Camp Strake (near Evergreen, Texas) planned to open late 2019 and a new Janis and George Fleming Cub World at Bovay Scout Ranch (near Navasota, Texas), which will open in a few years.  It also comprises making improvements to Camp Brosig (near Sealy, Texas) and McNair Cub Adventure Camp at Bovay Scout Ranch (near Navasota, Texas). Please view the Camp Strake Video for additional information about the exciting plans for Camp Strake.

Camp Strake has had a construction schedule with a plan for opening in summer 2019 for Boy Scout summer resident camp.  However, due to unfavorable weather conditions for construction, including multiple significant rainfall events since the 2nd quarter of 2016 that delayed the initial groundbreaking and site clearing, and Hurricane Harvey in the 3rd quarter of 2017, which affected the timing for acquisition of a critical federal permit -- construction is behind that schedule. 

Aerial View of Tsuru Scout Camp

Because of the impact our unfavorable weather has had and continues to have on construction progress, we are at risk of not having the Tsuru Scout Camp finished by May 2019 in time for Boy Scout summer resident camp.  Therefore, rather than trying to rush the construction beyond what is practical and risk not having the Tsuru Scout Camp completely operational for summer 2019, the decision has been made to cease planning to conduct the 2019 Boy Scout summer resident camp at Camp Strake.  The timing of the decision and announcement will allow troops to make alternative summer resident camp plans for 2019.

Plans remain to open Camp Strake later in 2019.  The opening date is predicated on favorable weather conditions and no unforeseen circumstances.  Additional information will follow in the coming months regarding the timeline and commissioning plans.  

Please see the Frequently Asked Questions Regarding Camp Development –  March 2018 Update (“FAQ”) below for information about the Camping Vision Statement, properties master plan, schedules and plans for Boy Scout summer resident camp during summer 2018 and 2019. 

For additional information about Camp Strake (e.g., design plans, construction schedule, periodic updates), please reference www.samhoustonbsa.org/camp-strake

Funding  

Donations are a major source of funding to develop capital improvements in the properties master plan. The council is in the midst of a major gifts campaign called Leaders of Tomorrow Campaign, which will dedicate more than $21 million for this purpose. The Leaders of Tomorrow Campaign is an initiative to unleash the potential of our programs and camp properties to best serve the needs of Scouting families in the 21st century. Please refer to the Leaders of Tomorrow Campaign for more information.

 

Frequently Asked Questions - Updated March 2018

General Camp Development

What are the Sam Houston Area Council’s plans for camp development?

In 2012, the Sam Houston Area Council (“Council”) approved a new Camping Vision Statement: Exemplary, Sustainable Outdoor Experiences and Creative Learning for 21st Century Youth and Their Leaders.”

Our vision is to become a leader in camping by having first-class facilities that are well maintained and to provide safe, fun and educational outdoor programs for our Scouts.

To achieve this vision, the council has a properties master plan.  This plan is modified from time to time based on need and situational events.

The plan includes developing new camps such as the Tellepsen Scout Camp at Bovay Scout Ranch (near Navasota, Texas) that opened in 2015, the new Camp Strake (near Evergreen, Texas) that is currently scheduled to open no later than end of 2019, and a new Janis and George Fleming Cub World at Bovay Scout Ranch (near Navasota, Texas), which will open in a few years.  It also comprises making improvements to Camp Brosig (near Sealy, Texas) and McNair Cub Adventure Camp at Bovay Scout Ranch (near Navasota, Texas).   

Are there any metrics/standards being used to measure how the council achieves the Camping Vision Statement?

Yes.  They are below.

Exemplary

  • Do the camps provide the opportunity to fulfill the aims and methods of Scouting?
  • Are facilities and programs safe and well maintained and meet today’s standards?
  • Are all program needs (Cub Scouts, Boy Scouts, and Venturing) based on the defined role of the camp being met? 
  • Are the numbers of participants utilizing the programs at an appropriate level and increasing over time?
  • Are the programs fun, creative and educational?
  • Are the camps appropriately located for their intended use?

Sustainable

  • Does the camp operate within a board approved budget?
  • Is the property environmentally sound for future generations?

21st Century Youth

  • Are programs that are conducted attractive and exciting for today’s youth?
  • Are the programs that are conducted leading youth to lifelong values, service and achievement?

Other

  • User (youth and adult) feedback will be sought as a confirmation of their experience.

Definitions

  • Well maintained – “routine maintenance and major maintenance is conducted as scheduled and needed.”
  • Environmentally sound for future generations – “the camp and its facilities are designed, managed and maintained in a manner that balances program use with sustainability.”
  • Attractive and exciting for today’s youth – “incredible facilities and fun and/or intense outdoor programs that expand the limits of what youth can do."

Camp Strake

Where is the location of the new Camp Strake that is being constructed?
The new camp is located near the community of Evergreen, Texas, between New Waverly and Coldspring, and is about 75 miles from Houston. It is near Highway 150.  Scouts and Scouters will be able to easily get there by taking Interstate 45 or Highway 59.  It is about a thirty-minute drive from the entrance of the original Camp Strake. 



 
How many acres does the new Camp Strake have?
The property includes 2,816 acres and is surrounded on three sides by the Sam Houston National Forest. 






 
Why was this site selected?
The Evergreen site was selected because it is in the heart of our target area, met our site selection criteria, which included convenient location and protection from urbanization and encroachment, and allows for expansion for programs in the future.  It is surrounded on three sides by the Sam Houston National Forest, the Lone Star Hiking Trail is adjacent to the property, and the site will have easy access after the completion of the Grand Parkway.  

 
What will the new Camp Strake look like?

The new Camp Strake will be first-class and state-of-the-art for Scouts and their leaders and will have two distinct sections:

  • A Scout camp named the Tsuru Scout Camp developed for weekend and resident camp operations for Boy Scouts / Future Older Girl program and Venturers;
  • The Leadership Institute for advanced training programs for adult leaders and Boy Scouts / Future Older Girl program and Venturers. 

The Scout camp for Boy Scouts and Venturers will have the following facilities:

  • 20 campsites with pavilions
  • Air-conditioned dining hall with 450 person capacity
  • Camp headquarters building
  • Large program pavilion
  • STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) center
  • Merit badge pavilions
  • Shooting Sports complex with rifle, shotgun and pistol ranges and for archery, including a sporting arrows course
  • Climbing pavilion with restrooms
  • Low ropes course
  • Zip line
  • Climbing and rappelling tower
  • Bikes and all-terrain vehicle (ATV) area
  • Aquatics Center with a swimming pool and pool house
  • Aquatics Center with lake (28-acre lake being created), observation deck and canoe storage
  • Aquatics training pavilion
  • Sports fields
  • Basketball court
  • Extensive trail system
  • Order of the Arrow ceremony site
  • Arena for 1,200 people
  • 1 Chapel for 250 people
  • 1 Chapel for 100 people
  • Modern restrooms and shower houses
  • 40 summer camp staff huts

The Leadership Institute will have the following facilities:

  • Leadership Training Center
  • 4 dormitories with 32-person capacity each
  • 4 cabins with 8-person capacity each
  • Arena for 100 people
  • Chapel for 100 people
  • 2 Training pavilions
  • Training campsite
  • Shower houses
When will the new Camp Strake open?

Camp Strake is currently under construction.  It has had a construction schedule with a plan for opening in summer 2019 in time for Boy Scout summer resident camp. However, due to unfavorable weather conditions for construction, including multiple significant rainfall events since the 2nd quarter of 2016 that delayed the initial groundbreaking and site clearing, and Hurricane Harvey in the 3rd quarter of 2017, which affected the timing for acquisition of a critical federal permit -- construction is behind that schedule. 

Because of the impact our unfavorable weather has had and continues to have on construction progress, we are at risk of not having the Tsuru Scout Camp finished by May 2019 in time for Boy Scout summer resident camp.  Therefore, rather than trying to rush the construction beyond what is practical and risk not having the Tsuru Scout Camp completely operational for summer 2019, the decision has been made to cease planning to conduct the 2019 Boy Scout summer resident camp at Camp Strake.  The timing of the decision and announcement will allow troops to make alternative summer resident camp plans for 2019.

Plans remain to open Camp Strake later in 2019. The opening date is predicated on favorable weather conditions and no unforeseen circumstances. Additional information will follow in the coming months regarding the timeline and commissioning plans.
Why is it taking until 2019 to open the new Camp Strake since the land was purchased back in 2013 and 2014?

There are many things that go into the development of a project of this size and it takes time to accomplish them all. Just imagine, during many of our programs throughout the year, Camp Strake will be the largest community in San Jacinto County.    

Compare Camp Strake to a university campus or small city. Each have features such as roads, power, water, sewer, buildings and other amenities, which require permitting from the local, state and/or federal levels -- some of which take considerable time. Camp Strake is just like constructing a university campus or small city. 

Additionally, unfavorable weather conditions for construction have caused the project to fall behind its original construction schedule.

Following are some highlights about Camp Strake when the project is completed:
 

  • 4 miles of roads
  • 11.7 miles of trails
  • 122 vertical structures
  • Over 150,000 square feet of facilities
  • 3 Chapels
  • 20 Campsites with pavilions
  • Aquatics Center with a swimming pool and pool house
  • 28-acre lake for non-motorized boating, swimming and fishing
  • 12 Modern restrooms/shower houses
  • Air-conditioned dining hall with a 450-person capacity
  • STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) Center
  • Shooting Sports complex with rifle, shotgun and pistol ranges and for archery, including a sporting arrows course
  • Climbing tower and COPE course
  • 19 Training/Merit badge pavilions
  • Administrative (camp headquarters) building
  • Arena for 1,200 people
  • 40 Summer camp staff huts
  • Training center
  • 4 (32-person capacity) dorms
  • 4 (8-person capacity) cabins
  • Wastewater treatment plant

Following are some of the processes and projects that have gone into and will continue to go into the development the camp:

  • Program requirements established by Camp Strake Project Definition Team
  • Master planning by architect based on program requirements
  • Land study for infrastructure including roads, power, water, sewer and lake, etc.
  • Endangered species and archeological studies conducted as required
  • Design completed by Camp Strake Design Team with architect after multiple focus group meetings involving Scouts, leaders, and special user groups such as climbing, shooting sports, etc.
  • Budget developed and approved by Board of Directors
  • Construction documents for all infrastructure features and 122 vertical structures completed by architect
  • Contractor(s) selected by Camp Strake Construction Committee
  • Required permits obtained from local, state and federal agencies
  • Site work including creation of new 28-acre lake
  • Infrastructure (roads, power, water and sewer) constructed
  • Multiple permits at the local, state and federal levels
  • Vertical structures (122) constructed
Additionally, the creation of a new lake requires obtaining state and federal permits that take considerable time.  After the permits are obtained and the site work for the lake is completed, it then takes many months for the lake to fill with rainwater.
Can I go see the new Camp Strake site now?
No, not at this time. While we are very anxious for everyone to see the new Camp Strake, it is an active construction site and therefore it is not safe for visitors. Additionally, because of contractual agreements with our contractors doing the work there, we are required to restrict visitor access.

In the meantime, we will provide updates including photographs of the work in progress at www.samhoustonbsa.org/camp-strake.

Camp Strake Progress

Will there be opportunities to see the Camp Strake before it is fully constructed and opened?

We think there will be, but none have been scheduled yet due to the construction schedule. We plan to seek help with service projects in developing the 11.7 miles of hiking trails on the property. A plan for that will be developed and announced later.

 

 

 

Where can I get additional information about Camp Strake and keep up with its construction?
Information about Camp Strake is on the council’s website. Periodic updates on the progress of construction will be posted there. Please reference www.samhoustonbsa.org/camp-strake.

Camp Strake Progress

What will we do if we use all the space at Camp Strake

The site for Camp Strake was selected because it contains 2,816 acres and provides ample space for expanding programs and adding campsites for weekend camping for Boy Scouts/Venturers for years to come. The Tsuru Scout Camp and Leadership Institute areas are only impacting about 500 acres, so we have ample space for future expansion.

Also, the property is already master planned with a site for a future Cub World.

Summer Camp 2018 and 2019

What are the council’s plans for Boy Scout summer resident camp in summer 2018 and 2019 until the new Tsuru Scout Camp at Camp Strake can open?

Our plans are not to conduct Boy Scout summer resident camp at one of our camp properties and instead assist our Boy Scout troops to find a suitable summer resident camp at another council’s camp to meet their needs. 

There are many other local council camps in the Texas region.  We have partnered with the Capitol Area Council headquartered in Austin, Texas for troops to consider their Boy Scout summer camp program at Lost Pines Scout Reservation, located in Bastrop, Texas. 

The Capitol Area Council has expanded their Lost Pines Boy Scout Summer Camp seasons in 2018 and 2019 to accommodate our troops. 

Also, we will continue to provide campership assistance for our Scouts in need to participate in a Boy Scout summer resident camp program if they attend the Lost Pines Boy Scout Summer Camp in 2018 or 2019.

Why not plan to open in summer 2019 even if the Tsuru Scout Camp is not completely constructed?
The primary reasons are: 
  1. We want to provide the best experience possible and having a fully operational camp is the best way to do that.
  2. If the camp is not fully constructed by that time, it would mean it is still an active construction site.  An active construction site would be unsafe for campers and would include restricted areas.  Also, it would not be prudent or cost effective to pause construction and require our contractors to come back two months later to complete their projects.
     
How would my troop register for Lost Pines Boy Scout Summer Camp at the Lost Pines Scout Reservation for summer 2018, and how would my Scout/s in need of campership assistance apply for it?
The link to the Capitol Area Council’s website page for Lost Pines Boy Scout Summer Camp is www.bsacac.org/activities/for_boy_scouts/summercamp.

Once their registration for summer resident camp 2018 and 2019 is open, just register for a session with them just as you would any other camp.

The application for your Scout(s) that need campership assistance will be conducted through the Sam Houston Area Council.  Please contact the Support Services Department at the Council for additional information regarding that application process.

For all Scouts that we provide a campership to attend Lost Pines Boy Scout Camp in summer 2018 or 2019, we will pay the Capitol Area Council directly on behalf of your troop.

 
Can my Scouts who need campership assistance apply for a campership if my troop is attending summer resident camp at any other camp other than Lost Pines Boy Scout Summer Camp?
No. We are only providing campership assistance for our Scouts whose troops are attending summer resident camp in 2018 or 2019 at Lost Pines Boy Scout Summer Camp.
Why is that?

While we will promote all local councils’ camps in the Texas region for your troop to consider attending in summer 2018 or 2019, we decided to pair up with a camp close to Houston that had the ability to increase capacity at its camp and for simplicity in processing campership assistance that we will continue to provide to our Scouts in need.  

The Capitol Area Council’s Lost Pines Scout Reservation is located outside of Bastrop, which is approximately 125 miles and about a two-hour drive from Houston.

Why not conduct Boy Scout summer resident camp at Bovay Scout Ranch utilizing Tellepsen Scout Camp in summer 2018 or 2019 like we have been doing for Boy Scout Winter Camp?

That was considered but decided not to for reasons such as:

  • Cub Scout Resident Camp is conducted in June and July at the McNair Cub Adventure Camp at Bovay Scout Ranch. This would conflict with scheduling a Boy Scout resident camp at Bovay Scout Ranch because each program would need to use the dining hall at the same time.
  • Because of the scheduling conflict and use of the dining hall, a Boy Scout summer resident camp program could not be scheduled until late July, which historically has had the lowest demand for summer camp sessions.   
  • Rather than planning to conduct one or two week-long sessions of Boy Scout resident camp at Bovay Scout Ranch, utilizing Tellepsen Scout Camp that would have to be held in late July that we anticipate the demand would be low, we determined it would be more helpful and effective to find a suitable summer resident camp at another council’s camp to meet their needs.
  • Lack of ability to conduct the standard summer aquatic programs.

Camp Strake Programs

Will Boy Scout resident camp be held at Camp Strake?

Yes.  Camp Strake will be home to our summer resident camp programs for our Boy Scouts / Future Older Girl program and for our Boy Scout winter resident camp program. 

While the original construction schedule was to have it completed by May 2019 in time for the 2019 Boy Scout summer resident camp, due to unfavorable weather conditions for construction, including multiple significant rainfall events since the 2nd quarter of 2016 that delayed the initial groundbreaking and site clearing, and Hurricane Harvey in the 3rd quarter of 2017, which affected the timing for acquisition of a critical federal permit -- construction is behind that schedule.

Because of the impact our unfavorable weather has had and continues to have on construction progress, the decision has been made to cease planning to conduct the 2019 Boy Scout summer resident camp at Camp Strake.  The timing of the decision and announcement will allow troops to make alternative summer resident camp plans for 2019.

Plans remain to open Camp Strake later in 2019.  The opening date is predicated on favorable weather conditions and no unforeseen circumstances.  Additional information will follow in the coming months regarding the timeline and commissioning plans.  

Also, Boy Scout winter resident camp will move to Camp Strake from McNair Cub Adventure Camp at Bovay Scout Ranch.  The current schedule for that to occur is December of 2019.  The opening date is predicated on favorable weather conditions and no unforeseen circumstances.  Additional information will follow in the coming months regarding the timeline and commissioning plans.
 
What types of programs will be offered at Boy Scout summer resident camps at Camp Strake?
The Boy Scout summer resident camp programs at Camp Strake – both during the summer and winter – will be the opportunity to show the full range of what Camp Strake has to offer. Current plans for these programs include:
  • A fully-trained staff engaged to deliver the best possible program experience
  • Exceptional food service in a new, state-of-the-art and air-conditioned dining hall
  • Unique staffed program experiences in "Challenging Outdoor Personal Experience" (COPE), aquatics (lakefront and pool-based), shooting sports, climbing, STEM and ecology, and Scouting skills
  • Exciting backcountry opportunities in hiking, biking, and ATV programs
  • Impressive camp-wide events, including campfire programs at a spirit-filled 1,200 person arena
  • Comfortable camping facilities that will include pavilions in each campsite, modern and convenient restroom/shower facilities, and direct access to key program areas
  • Between summer and winter camps, over 75 unique merit badges will be offered, in addition to a comprehensive First Class emphasis program.
What programs will Camp Strake offer for weekend camping for Boy Scouts and Venturers?

Camp Strake will offer a full range of program opportunities for unit-led outdoor experiences. During a weekend, a troop or crew will have the opportunity to utilize the aquatics programs at the new lake and pool, experience a state-of-the-art shooting sports program, seek adventure in climbing and COPE activities, or explore the vast network of trails, including the Lone Star Hiking Trail in the Sam Houston National Forest, through hiking and backpacking programs.
 

 

What types of programs will be offered at the Leadership Institute at Camp Strake?
The Leadership Institute at Camp Strake will serve as the council’s primary site for our pinnacle training opportunities for youth and adults – Wood Badge and National Youth Leadership Training (NYLT). It will also serve as a facility to accommodate basic and supplemental training, as well as a venue for planning meetings and retreats for Scouting groups.

We also are planning for it to be the site for some BSA area-wide and regional training courses.





 

Cub World at Bovay Scout Ranch

Will there be a new Cub World at Camp Strake?
Not at this time.  However, there will be a new Cub World named the Janis and George Fleming Cub World developed at the Bovay Scout Ranch instead of Camp Strake.  It is planned to be constructed in a few years.





 
Why is the Janis and George Fleming Cub World going to be at Bovay Scout Ranch instead of Camp Strake?
Primarily, there are two reasons. First, we already have facilities for Cub Scouts at Bovay Scout Ranch, and there is ample room for expansion utilizing the existing resources for our Cub camping program.

Second, is more cost-effective. We already have some infrastructure in place at Bovay Scout Ranch to support incorporating a new Cub World. At the new Camp Strake, the infrastructure, including roads, sewer, water, etc., would have to be constructed to support a Cub World there.



 
When will the new Janis and George Fleming Cub World at Bovay Scout Ranch constructed?
No schedule has been developed at this time. However, it is an important project and plans are being developed to construct the first phase as soon as all the necessary funding is secured.

The first phase of development includes six campsites, each with a pavilion, three restrooms/showers and two program elements. Additional phases will be added as funding is secured.




 
Will there ever be a Cub World at Camp Strake?
There could be. Camp Strake has the space and is master planned for a Cub World. The necessary demand for another Cub World and the funding to develop it will determine that timing.






 

Bovay Scout Ranch

What are the plans for McNair Cub Adventure Camp at Bovay Scout Ranch?

Following are the planned projects by priority:

  • First Group of Projects
    • Roadway renovations
    • Restroom (Field Sports area)
    • Refurbish and repair existing buildings
  • Second Group of Projects
    • Parking lot expansion
    • Electrical extension into campsites
    • Storage facility at lake front
    • Pool renovation
    • Storage/Check-out building for the BMX Track
    • Nature Building Renovation (concrete floor)
  • Third Group of Projects
    • Storage facility at lake front
    • Expand pool features
When will these projects at McNair Cub Adventure Camp at Bovay Scout Ranch be completed?
Projects will be completed as soon as the needed funds are raised and collected through the Leaders of Tomorrow campaign.

 

Camp Brosig

What are the plans for Camp Brosig?

The plans for Camp Brosig are to continue to make improvements to it as soon as the needed funds are raised and collected through the Leaders of Tomorrow Campaign.

Following are the planned projects:

  • Road repairs
  • Camp entrance
  • 2 shower/restroom facilities
  • BB gun range (Cub Scouts)
  • Archery range (Cub Scouts)
  • 2 program pavilions
  • Campsite pavilions (carport style)

General

Our camps have not always been well maintained. How will the council maintain our new camps and the improvements that are being made now?
For the first time in our council’s history, we have an endowment with sufficient resources to maintain Camp Strake into the future. We are in the process of building an endowment for Bovay Scout Ranch that in time may have sufficient resources to maintain it over time, as well.

The resources of the council are limited. We are thoughtful and take seriously our charge to use those resources wisely to provide Scouting programs to an increasing number of youth. That is our mission. It is important that we eliminate redundancies in properties and have efficient and sustainable camp operations.

The way we will maintain our camps requires us to not have more camp properties than we need based on usage, demand, and sustainability. Also, we desire and are striving to an adequate endowment for the camps that we need based on usage and demand.
How many camp properties and acres of land will the council own and operate after Camp Strake is completed?

Our council will own and operate three camp properties with a combined total of 4,395 acres. 

  • Bovay Scout Ranch / 1,245 contiguous acres and an additional separate 242 acres.  It includes:  
    • McNair Cub Scout Adventure Camp
    • Future Janis and George Fleming Cub World
    • Tellepsen Scout Camp
  • Camp Brosig / 92 acres
  • Camp Strake / 2,816 acres. It includes:
    • Tsuru Scout Camp 
    • Leadership Institute (to be named)
What is the history of camp properties that the council closed and sold?

The council’s first camp was Camp Masterson. It was located twenty-one miles from Houston near Shelton. The land, consisting of 20 acres, was donated to the Council in 1925. It was closed and the land was given back to the Masterson family heirs in 1927.

Camp Hudson was the Council’s second camp. It was located in Houston on what is known today as Memorial Drive. The land for it, consisting of 100 acres, was donated to the Council in 1925 and 1928. It was closed and the land was sold in 1973.

The council’s third camp was Camp Strake. It was located in Conroe about 38 miles from Houston. The land, consisting of 2,359 acres, was purchased in 1943. In 2012, it was decided to relocate Camp Strake to a rural area. This resulted in the land of the original Camp Strake to be sold in 2013, with a lease back from the buyer for the use of the land through 2014.

The land for the new Camp Strake, consisting of 2,816 acres, was purchased in two separate transactions. The first in 2013 and the second in 2014.

The council’s fourth camp was El Rancho Cima. It was purchased in 1954 using funds raised from a capital campaign. It is located near Wimberley, Texas about 30 miles south of Austin and 45 miles north of San Antonio. It was approximately 185 miles from downtown Houston, resulting in a drive time from that location of plus/minus four hours on a Friday evening.

In May 2015, flooding caused significant damage and loss to the Cockrell River Camp at El Rancho Cima resulting in its closing. In the ten plus years prior to the May 2015 flood, there had been other flooding. After months of diligent analysis by a special task force of the Council’s Board of Directors in 2015, it was decided to eventually close El Rancho Cima and sell the property. The camp was closed in 2017 and the property is being marketed to be sold.

The Hudson Scout Reservation was another of the council’s camps. It was located about 120 miles from Houston near Centerville, Texas. The land, consisting of 3,190 acres, was purchased in 1974. It was closed and the land was sold in 1991.

The Hamman Scout Camp was another of the council’s camp properties. It was located seven miles southwest of the city of Bandera, Texas, which is approximately 250 miles from downtown Houston. The land, consisting of 965 acres, was donated to the Council in 1987 and was sold in 2017.

 

Questions

For additional questions, contact communications@shac.org.

 

 

 

 

 

Two-Deep Leadership 

Posted by Darlene Scheffler Tuesday, February 6, 2018 8:42:00 AM

What’s the difference between ‘two-deep leadership’ and ‘no one-on-one contact’?

Source: Scouting Magazine

While no Scouter questions the value of Youth Protection training and policies — we all agree on the need to keep young people safe — some Scouters have asked for clarification about implementation.

Many of those questions are about policies requiring two-deep leadership and prohibiting one-on-one contact. On occasion, those separate policies get confused and intermingled.

So I checked with the Youth Protection team for clarification.

Essentially, it boils down to this: At least two adults are required on every BSA outing. During that outing, there should be no one-on-one contact between an adult and a youth. The “no one-on-one contact” rule also applies to leaders interacting with youth outside of the Scouting program where grooming of youth, parents and other adults could occur. Parents and youth are advised to follow this and other Youth Protection policies for the overall safety of all involved.

But there might be moments when just one leader is present with two or more Scouts. That’s fine, as long as the situation doesn’t involve one adult and one youth. (Of course, if we’re talking about a Scout with his or her parent/guardian, that’s always OK.)

For example, let’s say Troop 451 is driving to a campout. There are nine Scouts and three adults on the trip. The first SUV might have two adults and five Scouts. The other would then have one adult and four Scouts. Is this a “two-deep leadership” violation? No. (I covered this back in 2015.)

What about if there are only two adults present on a campout of eight Scouts, and one group wants to go hiking while the other stays at camp to fish?

While Youth Protection policies don’t expressly forbid it, it’s not the recommended approach because of health and safety concerns. What if the adult on the hike gets injured? What if the adult back at camp has an emergency? In those situations, it would be helpful to have a second adult present. Many troops in that situation would want at least four leaders: two to go on the hike and two to stay at camp.

For a closer look at this important subject, here’s what the Youth Protection team said:

What do ‘two-deep leadership’ and ‘no one-on-one contact’ mean?

While sometimes the Youth Protection policies may seem to be confusing, they really aren’t. Therefore we’d like to provide the following in hopes of clarity on the actions of two-deep leadership and no one-on-one contact.

From the Youth Protection website, let us provide the following:

Scouting’s Barriers to Abuse

The BSA has adopted the following policies for the safety and well-being of its members. These policies primarily protect youth members; however, they also serve to protect adult leaders. Parents and youth using these safeguards outside the Scouting program further increase the safety of their youth. Those who serve in positions of leadership and supervision with youth outside the Scouting program will find these policies help protect youth in those situations as well.

  • Two-deep leadership is required on all outings. A minimum of two registered adult leaders — or one registered leader and a participating Scout’s parent or another adult — is required for all trips and outings. One of these adults must be 21 years of age or older.
  • One-on-one contact between adults and youth members is prohibited. In situations requiring a personal conference, such as a Scoutmaster conference, the meeting is to be conducted with the knowledge and in view of other adults and/or youth.
  • The policies of two-deep leadership and no one-on-one contact between adults and youth members also apply to digital communication. Leaders may not have one-on-one private online communications or engage one-on-one in other digital activities (games, social media, etc.) with youth members. Leaders should copy a parent and another leader in digital and online communication, ensuring no one-on-one contact takes place in text, social media, or other forms of online or digital communication.

Why are these policies in place, and how do they differ?

Safety from all forms of abuse, including sexual abuse and injury from accidents, is crucial for all Scouting programs. Requiring a minimum of two adults participating allows for more supervision so that leaders can take a break and still have more than enough supervision present.

The “no one-on-one contact” rule (which, remember, includes digital communications, such as text, emails and gaming) is a core component of combating the “grooming” of a youth for sexual abuse.

An abusive adult will seek to have a one-on-one relationship with a youth separate from adults, parents and peers which includes inappropriate conversations, and seeking to being alone with a youth. This typically occurs in and out of Scouting program activities when a leader seeking to sexually abuse a child seeks to separate the child from appropriate adult.

While similar to two-deep Leadership in some ways, “no one-on-one” specifically states that adult/youth interactions is not appropriate without another adult — preferably a Youth Protection-trained leader — being present.

Additionally, our Health and Safety team strongly recommends a minimum of two adult leaders on all outings in case of injury to a youth or an adult. This is so aid can be sought without putting youth at risk.

A question from a Scouter, annotated

Below I have included an email I received from a Scout volunteer in New York.

The Scouter’s words are in black. The Youth Protection team’s responses are in red.

In our troop, and at summer camp with other troops, it seems nobody understands Youth Protection consistently. The most common misunderstanding is that two adults must always be present with any number of Scouts. 

This causes our Troop leadership to require at least four adults on each campout, so two can remain in camp while two others go off on activities with the boys, for instance. That’s great.

It seems like the policies of Two Deep, and No One-on-One get confused and intermingled, when in fact they are generally related, but different policies. See the explanation above.

My understanding is, as long as Two Deep is practiced for the overall campout or event, it is always OK for a single adult to be with Scouts as long as there is more than one boy present. Not quite, we prefer to have a minimum of two adults as your previous paragraph described.….

For instance, if half the Scouts stay in camp with one adult, and half go on a hike the the other adult, that is OK. Not a good idea, especially for Health and Safety reasons listed above. If the Scout leader were sick or injured, there would be no adults present. 

 I also understand it is OK for a single adult to be with a single Scout, as long as they are in view of others. For instance, at summer camp, an adult could take a boy to the infirmary, as long as they were in view of others during that time. True, given this example.

Or an adult and boy could canoe together, if they were in the proximity of other Scouts and adults. True, given this example.

I have put together the following summary of the Youth Protection policies that I am hoping may clarify things for those in our troop who don’t quite understand it. I would appreciate it if you would review it and tell me if you feel it is accurate and appropriate for me to share with other leaders. 

Two Deep Leadership

A minimum of two adults: at least one adult a minimum of 21 years old, and at least one adult who is a registered leader, is required for all trips and outings. Correct.

One-on-One Contact 

One-on-one contact between adults and youth members is prohibited. 

The following exceptions and situations are allowed:

– One Scout with his parent/guardian. No problem 

– One adult with two or more Scouts. That depends on the situation. For example, traveling to and from program activity, Scouting meetings and especially outside of Scouting it is not a good practice to have one adult with two Scouts, as the sexual abuser can and will use this as an opportunity to have singular access to Scouts.

– One adult with one Scout in view of other adults and/or youth. Seems OK, given the examples above. 

– Two adults with one or more Scouts. Excellent.  

Philmont Council Contingent 

Posted by Darlene Scheffler Friday, February 2, 2018 10:48:00 PM

Council Contingent

Each year the council sends several contingents of Scouts and Scouters to Philmont Scout Ranch. This is a great opportunity for units who have youth who want to attend Philmont but not enough youth to fill the minimum Philmont crew size requirement. Participants must meet the Philmont Scout Ranch health requirements and be a registered Scout (ages 14 or older) or Scouter. 

The cost to attend with the council contingent in 2018 is $1,750 (paid in three installments) and includes Philmont fees, transportation to and from Philmont, and food. Let us know if you are interested in attending. 

The link is an interest survey and does not commit a person to going or not going to Philmont.  If you express interest then someone from the council will contact you in regards to making a commitment.  

2018 Council Contingent Interest Form    

 

About Philmont

Philmont Scout Ranch is the Boy Scouts of America's largest national High Adventure Base. Its 34 staffed camps and 55 trail camps provide an unforgettable adventure in the high country along hundreds of miles of rugged, rocky trails.

Learn More

 

Contacts

Monica Cotten
Office Assistant
(713) 756-3322
Monica.Cotten@scouting.org

 

Brandon Lewis
Director of Support Service
(713) 756-3319
brandon.lewis@scouting.org

 

 

 

 

Family Scouting Update 

Posted by Darlene Scheffler Wednesday, October 25, 2017 8:50:00 AM

Recently, the BSA’s Board of Directors unanimously approved welcoming girls into our iconic Cub Scout program and delivering a Scouting program for older girls that will enable them to advance and earn the highest rank of Eagle Scout. This decision comes after years of receiving requests from families and girls. The BSA evaluated the results of numerous research efforts, gaining input from current members and leaders — as well as parents and girls who’ve never been involved in Scouting — to understand how to offer families an important additional choice in meeting the character development needs of all their children.

Starting in the 2018 program year, families can choose to sign up their sons and daughters for Cub Scouts. Existing packs may choose to establish a new girl pack, establish a pack that consists of girl dens and boy dens or remains an all-boy pack. Cub Scout dens will be single-gender — all boys or all girls. Using the same curriculum as the Boy Scouts program, the organization will also deliver a program for older girls, which will be announced in 2018 and projected to be available in 2019, that will enable them to earn the Eagle Scout rank. This unique approach allows us to maintain the integrity of the single-gender model while also meeting the needs of today’s families. 

This decision expands the programs that the Boy Scouts of America offers for both boys and girls. Although known for our iconic programs for boys, the BSA has offered co-ed programs since 1971 through Exploring and the Venturing program, which celebrates its 20th anniversary in 2018. The STEM Scout pilot program is also available for both boys and girls.

Read BSA’s announcement and additional information regarding Family Scouting:

The Sam Houston Area Council will now begin to develop plans on how to implement these decisions as they become effective in 2018 and 2019.  We will keep our stakeholder groups informed using various platforms. 

As we develop these plans to pursue new opportunities to better serve families, we acknowledge the value of the programs of Girl Scouts of the USA respecting their importance in meeting the needs of girls and that our programs can be complementary in meeting the needs of families with girls.

We are proud of the healthy relationship our Sam Houston Area Council has with our sister organization, the Girl Scouts of San Jacinto Council. We have had ongoing discussions with the executive leadership of the Girl Scouts of San Jacinto Council. The leadership of our two organizations is in dialogue on how we can direct each of our resources and proven programs to meet the needs of youth and families in the communities we serve.

Five Things You Should Know about the Boy Scouts of America’s Program Expansion

Source: October 2017

Cub Scouts

  1. Girls can join Cub Scouts in Fall 2018. Starting in August 2018, girls will be eligible to join the BSA's existing Cub Scouts program.
  2. Cub Scout dens will be single-gender — all boys or all girls. Cub Scout packs, meanwhile, will have local decision-making power to determine if I have a pack with only boy dens, a pack with boy dens and girl dens, or a pack with only girl dens.
  3. Charter organizations decide for their pack. A charter organization may choose to either remain an all-boy pack, have an all-girl pack, or a have a pack of girls and boys.

Boy Scouts

  1. A middle/high school age program for girls will launch in 2019. The BSA will announce a program for Boy Scout aged girls in 2018, which will launch in 2019. This program will parallel the current Boy Scout program, include the same curriculum and merit badges, and allow girls to earn the Eagle Scout rank.
  2. Program requirements will be the same for both genders. The BSA's existing programs for boys and the new programs for girls will operate under the same curriculum and requirements. There has been no indication in the information shared that would indicate any changes in the requirements. 



Family Program Questions and Answers

Decision and Rationale

Q. What decision did the BSA make regarding girls’ involvement in the organization?

The Boy Scouts of America’s Board of Directors unanimously approved to welcome girls into its iconic Cub Scout program and to deliver a Scouting program for older girls that will enable them to advance and earn the highest rank of Eagle Scout. It is important to note that the BSA did not decide to make the Cub Scouting and Boy Scouting programs co‐ed; instead, the organization has introduced a unique model that builds on the benefits of a single‐gender program while also providing character and leadership opportunities for both boys and girls.

Starting in 2018 (exact start date yet to be confirmed), families can choose to sign up their sons and daughters for Cub Scouts. Chartered partner organizations may choose to establish a new girl pack, establish a pack that consists of girl dens and boy dens or remain an all‐boy pack. Cub Scout dens will be single gender — all boys or all girls. Using the same curriculum as the Boy Scouts program, the organization will also deliver a new program for older girls, which will be announced in 2018 and projected to be available in 2019 (with a more specific start date to be determined soon), that will enable them to earn the Eagle Scout rank. This unique approach allows the organization to maintain the integrity of the single-gender model while also meeting the needs of today’s families.

Q. What do we know about the changing needs of today’s families?

The BSA is not only listening to our Scouting families, but also to those that haven’t joined theprogram. We understand that families today are busier and more diverse than ever.

  • Most are dual‐earners.
  • There are more single‐parent households than in previous decades.
  • Many underserved communities, including fastest‐growing Hispanic and Asian communities, prefer to participate in activities as a family.
  • And, all families have less free time. More than one‐third of parents feel they spend too little free time with their kids, and millennial parents are desperate to spend more time interacting with their kids.

Q. Is this change a result of the BSA’s declining membership numbers?

No. The BSA has experienced renewed interest in Scouting, and we believe that is largely in response to program innovation and a more thorough understanding of what families want and need when it comes to extracurricular activities. In fact, recent surveys of parents not involved with Scouting showed high interest in getting their daughters signed up for programs like Cub Scouts and Boy Scouts, with 90 percent expressing interest in a program like Cub Scouts and 87 percent expressing interest in a program like Boy Scouts. Following an evaluation of what families and young people want and need when it comes to extracurricular activities and Scouting, the BSA welcomes girls into expanded programs from Cub Scouts to the highest rank of Eagle Scout.

Q. Is this change a departure from the BSA’s core mission and values?

No. In fact, this aligns with our mission and values. After all, the values of Scouting as detailed in the 12 points of the Scout Law – trustworthy, loyal, helpful, friendly, courteous, kind, obedient, cheerful, thrifty, brave, clean and reverent – are relevant and important for both young men and women.

Our mission is to prepare young people to make ethical and moral choices over their lifetimes by instilling in them the values of the Scout Oath and Scout Law. To achieve our mission, we create innovative programs and evolve existing ones that respond to the needs of today’s families and deliver them through dedicated volunteers in communities across the nation.

Q. What research did the BSA conduct that informed this decision?

To inform this decision, the Boy Scouts of America conducted extensive research. The BSA also evaluated input from thousands of volunteers who participated in the nationwide family listening sessions.

The results were overwhelmingly positive and supported the decision to welcome girls into Cub Scouts and provide a path to earn the Eagle Scout rank. The research found that parents not involved with Scouting showed high interest in getting their daughters signed up for programs like Cub Scouts and Boy Scouts, with 90 percent expressing interest in a program like Cub Scouts and 87 percent expressing interest in a program like Boy Scouts. The BSA also surveyed young girls and found that 90 percent of girls age 11‐18 are interested in joining the BSA’s programs. Education experts also evaluated the curriculum and content and confirmed the relevance of the program for young women.

Q. Are BSA programs relevant for girls?

Yes. On average, more than 90 percent of Scouting families and leaders believe the BSA programs are relevant to both boys and girls. What’s more, education experts also evaluated the curriculum and content and confirmed the relevance of the program for young women.

Q. Why didn’t the BSA partner with the Girl Scouts or another organization to serve girls?

The BSA had several conversations with other youth‐serving organizations, but found through extensive research and conversations with parents that there is a need and an interest to welcome girls to our existing programs. We celebrate all youth‐serving organizations that build character and feel the most important thing is to allow parents the ability to choose the program that is best for their family. What’s more, the BSA has been providing programs to young girls since 1971 when we extended our Exploring program to young women. Girls also participate in our Venturing, Sea Scouts and STEM Scouts programs.

Q. How are the BSA programs different from what girls would experience with Girl Scouts?

BSA programs provide character‐ and leadership‐building experiences that give young people a solid foundation for their futures. We celebrate all youth‐serving organizations that build character and feel the most important thing is to allow parents the ability to choose what program is best for their family.

Q. Why are you just now allowing girls into the Boy Scouts?

The BSA’s decision to welcome girls into the Cub Scout program and to offer a program for older girls comes from input we have received from our Scouting families, as well as prospective Scouting families. We understand that families today are busier and more diverse than ever. The BSA believes we owe it to families to structure our program offerings in a way that fits into their busy lives to deliver character development and values‐based leadership training that Scouting promises. It is important to underscore that the BSA has provided programming to young women and young men for many years through Sea Scouts, STEM Scouts, Exploring and Venturing.

  • STEM Scouts: 45% of participants are girls/young women, 55% are boys/young men
  • Exploring: 39% of participants are girls/young women, 61% are boys/young men
  • Venturing: 23% of participants are girls/young women, 77% are boys/young men
  • Sea Scouts: 40% of participants are girls/young women, 60% are boys/young men

Q. Why is the BSA recommending single‐gender units instead of a co‐ed model?

The leadership of the BSA determined that the best way to welcome girls to serve today’s families was to offer a unique model that builds on the proven benefits of our single‐gender program, while also providing character and leadership opportunities for both boys and girls.

Community Response

Q. What are you hearing from BSA leaders around the country about this announcement?

The decision was informed by members of the BSA at all levels of the organization and from all parts of the country, so we are seeing support for the decision reflect that input. This is an exciting time for the BSA. We value the partnership with BSA leaders across the country as we continue to innovate and evolve our proven programs to meet the needs of today’s families and provide the types of experiences that parents and their children want most.

Q. Do you think current youth members or adult volunteers will withdraw?

The decision to welcome girls into expanded programs from Cub Scouts to Eagle Scout rank presents several opportunities for families to get their youth involved in a program that has been proven to deliver character and leadership traits that parents say they desire for their children. A Tufts University study found that youth who participate in Scouting for even a short period of time exhibit strong moral values and positive character attributes, allowing them to embrace new opportunities, overcome obstacles and become better prepared for future success. This programming is in response to what we’ve heard from our Scouting families in addition to those who are not involved in the BSA. A majority of parents surveyed said they are interested in having their daughters involved in a program like the Cub Scouts and Boy Scouts. What’s more, many of our current families, Scouts, donors, volunteers and professional staff are in support of this decision. We are confident that this change will meet the needs of today’s families.

Q. How do you know parents will sign their daughters up for Cub Scouts and Boy Scouts?

The BSA originally began discussions about young girls in Scouting based on numerous requests from families. We recognized a need and worked to understand how we could meet it. In addition to conversations with parents, recent surveys of parents not involved with Scouting showed high interest in getting their daughters signed up for programs like Cub Scouts and Boy Scouts, with 90 percent expressing interest in a program like Cub Scouts and 87 percent expressing interest in a program like Boy Scouts. We made this change so we could bring the benefits of Scouting to the greatest number of youth possible, all while staying true to our mission and core values outlined in the Scout Oath and Scout Law.

Q. What are the Girl Scouts saying about this expanded program for girls?

The BSA had several conversations with other youth‐serving organizations, but found through extensive research and conversations with parents that there is a need and an interest to welcome girls to our existing programs. We celebrate all youth‐serving organizations that build character and feel the most important thing is to allow parents the ability to choose what program is best for their family. What’s more, the BSA has been providing programs to young girls since 1971 when we extended our Exploring program to young women. Young girls also participate in our Venturing, Sea Scouts and STEM Scouts.

Operations and Implementation

Q. Is this for all levels of Scouting?

Starting in 2018 (exact start date yet to be confirmed), families can choose to sign up their sons and daughters for Cub Scouts. Existing packs may choose to establish a new girl pack, establish a pack that consists of girl dens and boy dens or remain an all‐boy pack. Cub Scout dens will be single gender — all boys or all girls. Using the same curriculum as the Boy Scouts program, the organization will also deliver a program for older girls, which will be announced in 2018 and projected to be available in 2019 (with a more specific start date to be determined soon), that will enable them to earn the Eagle Scout rank. This unique approach allows the organization to maintain the integrity of the single‐gender model while also meeting the needs of today’s families.

Q. How will the BSA respond to parents who don’t want coeducational programs?

It is important to note that BSA did not decide to make the Cub Scouts and Boy Scouts programs co‐ed; instead, the organization has introduced a unique model that builds on the benefits of a single‐gender program while also providing character and leadership opportunities for both boys and girls. Starting in 2018, families can choose to sign up their sons and daughters for Cub Scouts. Chartered partner organizations may choose to establish a new girl pack, establish a pack that consists of girl dens and boy dens or remain an all‐boy pack. Cub Scout dens will be single gender — all boys or all girls. Using the same curriculum as the Boy Scouts program, the organization will also deliver a new program for older girls, which will be announced in 2018 and projected to be available in 2019 (with a more specific start date to be determined soon), that will enable them to earn the Eagle Scout rank. This unique approach allows the organization to maintain the integrity of the single-gender model while also meeting the needs of today’s families.

Q. How soon can we integrate girls into packs? Can we have a “soft” roll out?

The implementation team has not yet finalized an official start date. Scout executives will receive notification as soon as timing is confirmed by the BSA National Executive Committee. Until then, it is recommended that all units that receive interest in the program from their community develop a list with contact information so that they can reach out to those interested when the details are finalized.

Q. At what age can girls join Scouting?

In 2018, families can choose Cub Scouts for their sons and daughters, starting at age six. A chartered partner may also decide to invite Kindergarten‐age girls to a den participating in the Lion program.

Q. Will you change the organization’s name?

The Boy Scouts of America, in name and as an organization, has stood for character development and values‐based leadership training for more than 107 years. It is, unequivocally, one of the most recognized, respected and valuable brands on the planet. Therefore, while we have expanded the reach of our programs among today’s youth and their families, our name remains the same, and our brand will continue to be a source of pride that we will protect and foster as we look to extend the reach of our promise to more families.

Q. In what cities/states will this program be available?

BSA’s programs are offered to youth nationwide.

Q. Will girls be able to earn the same merit badges?

Yes. Since merit badges are currently earned in the Boy Scout program, girls will be able to earn merit badges through the Scouting program for older girls that will be announced in 2018 and is projected to be implemented in 2019, with a more specific start date to be determined soon.

Q. Do chartered organizations have a choice whether or not to adopt the expanded program?

Yes. Charter organizations always have the option to select from the numerous BSA program offerings. They can select all or one of the BSA programs that they feel best meet the needs of their members and the communities around them.

Q. Will there be new curriculum for girl participants? Will you change the program to accommodate girls?

No. Our existing programs are relevant for young men and women. After all, the values of Scouting as outlined in the Scout Law – trustworthy, loyal, helpful, friendly, courteous, kind, obedient, cheerful, thrifty, brave, clean and reverent – are relevant and important values for both young men and women.

Q. Will girls have to meet the same requirement to achieve Eagle Scout?

Yes. Our goal is for young women to aspire to and achieve the Eagle Scout rank by meeting the same criteria and achievements as young men.

Q. How will packs and dens be structured? Can a chartered organization choose not to include girls?

An existing chartering organization may choose to serve girls or remain an all‐boy pack. When creating a new pack, a chartered organization may form an all‐boy pack, an all‐girl pack, multiple packs or a pack of girl dens and boy dens. Cub Scout dens will be single gender — all boys or all girls. Cub Scout packs, meanwhile, can include any combination of all‐boy or all‐girl dens. The choice is left to individual leaders in consultation with their chartered organization. This hybrid model builds on the benefit of a single‐gender program while also providing character and leadership opportunities for both boys and girls.

Q. If I have a question about how to incorporate girls into the pack, who should I talk to?

In an overwhelming number of existing packs across the country, girls have already informally been participating in activities, including pack meetings and family camping, so the BSA doesn’t foresee major issues in welcoming girls officially to packs. Because the program itself is not changing, your unit commissioner would be the most knowledgeable person to talk to about the Scouting program. Your district executive is also a resource.

Q. What updates to youth protection will be implemented to ensure the safety of boys and girls?

Youth protection and safety is paramount in all of the BSA’s programs. We invest resources and time to continuously strengthen our youth protection program. At the Cub Scout level, the program is already designed for the family, and we’ve had sisters of Cub Scouts participating in activities for many years – that was one of the reasons we were moved to consider this decision. Young women have been part of Venturing for two decades, and the current youth protection requirements already apply to both male and female participants. Two‐deep leadership is required at all meetings, events and outings. This is a minimum requirement and additional supervision may be necessary, depending on the nature of the activities and the size of the group. As we deliver this additional program for older girls, we will be evaluating any changes needed to ensure the safety of all youth.

Q. What about camping with girls?

Since camping in the Cub Scout program includes the entire family, the Cub Scout outdoor family camping guidelines are still in place regardless of a pack’s composition. Camping guidelines for older girl participants will be confirmed when the organization announces the Scouting program for older girls in 2018, for implementation in 2019. As a point of reference, young women have been part of Venturing for two decades, and the current youth protection requirements already apply to both male and female participants. Twodeep leadership is required at all meetings, events and outings. This is a minimum requirement and additional supervision may be necessary, depending on the nature of the activities and the size of the group. As always, the BSA continues to evaluate and improve our youth protection training across all programs. In Venturing, when an activity includes both boys and girls, at least one adult male and one adult female must be present at the activity, one of whom must be registered as an adult member of the BSA.

Q. Will girls be allowed into the Order of the Arrow?

Youth members that join the Scouting program for older girls (11 to 18) will be eligible to join a Scouting honor society. Details about a Scouting honor society for girls will be shared when plans for an older girl program are announced in 2018 for implementation in 2019.

Q. May an adult male lead an all‐girl unit?

Yes, an adult male can lead an all‐girl unit, just as we already have adult females leading all boy programs. Youth protection requirements still apply to both male and female participants. Two-deep leadership is required at all meetings, events and outings. This is a minimum requirement and additional supervision may be necessary, depending on the nature of the activities and the size of the group.

Q. Should dens for girls and dens for boys meet at the same time and place?

It is up to the pack or the den to decide meeting times and places.

Q. Can separate boy and girl dens work on the same activity at the same time together?

There is no set rule or guideline on this. If appropriate, this can be treated the same as two dens of the same gender working together. It will be up to the good judgement of leaders to decide what is best for their units.

Q. Will we have different uniforms for boys and girls?

All uniforms continue to be reviewed and adjusted to meet participant needs. While the fit and styling may be a bit different, the uniforms will remain fundamentally the same.

Q. Will the basic training courses be modified to include some specifics on working with girls and addressing their specific developmental needs?

Yes, we will evaluate our training and update materials as needed.

Q. What facility changes will need to happen at our camps?

The Boy Scouts of America has been serving young women for decades. Councils will evaluate their program facilities and make any needed changes.

Q. Will current Venturers get credit for their crew leadership roles if the girls join a troop and need leadership experience for advancement?

Advancement guidelines for older girl participants will be confirmed when the organization announces the Scouting program for older girls in 2018.

Q. Will the expansion be rolled out like a pilot, or implemented all at one time?

The Boy Scouts of America’s Board of Directors unanimously approved to welcome girls into its iconic Cub Scout program and to deliver a Scouting program for older girls that will enable them to advance and earn the highest rank of Eagle Scout. This will not be handled as a pilot.

Q. How do units respond to girls who want to join BSA programs immediately?

We are excited to welcome girls who are interested in joining the Cub Scouting program in 2018. The implementation team has not yet finalized an official start date. Scout executives will receive notification as soon as timing is confirmed by the Executive Committee. Until then, it is recommended that all units that receive interest in the program from their community develop a list with contact information so they can reach out to those interested when the details are finalized.

Q. Have major chartered partners met and weighed in on this change?

Chartered partners were consulted throughout the research and evaluation process. Since the decision we have received supportive feedback from a number of our partners.

Q. What is being done to help us with diversity?

Diversity continues to be important to the Boy Scouts of America. We are dedicated to creating an environment that welcomes diversity and inclusion at all levels of the organization in order to best meet the needs of today’s youth, families, and communities. Our focus goes beyond ethnicity to include gender and generational diversity, which we believe add to the richness of the BSA through the exchange of ideas from people with various backgrounds and experiences.

Q. Will girls who enter in the fall of 2018 as Arrow of Light have a troop ready to accept them at crossover time in 2019?

Yes, we expect that the Scouting program for older girls will be ready to accept participants in 2019. A specific start date has yet to be confirmed.

 

 

 

 

Scouts First Helpline 

Posted by Darlene Scheffler Wednesday, October 25, 2017 7:45:00 AM

'Scouts First' Helpline for Abuse and Youth Protection

BSA, Our Commitment

The protection of youth is the primary obligation of every individual involved in the Boy Scouts of America — including leaders, parents, members and professionals. The BSA has been and will continue to be vigilant in its efforts to create barriers that help prevent abuse and to recognize and report child abuse regardless of where it occurs.

Nationwide, the BSA requires everyone involved with Scouting to report any known or suspected abuse to local authorities.

Scouts First Helpline

As part of the BSA’s “Scouts First” approach to the protection and safety of youth, the BSA has established a dedicated 24-hour helpline at 844-SCOUTS FIRST (844-726-8871) to receive reports of any known or suspected abuse or significant violations of youth protection policies that might put a youth at risk.

24-hour helpline: 844-SCOUTS FIRST (844-726-8871)

The helpline’s goal is to provide immediate assistance to BSA professionals in the investigation, reporting and dealing with abuse allegations or to ensure that the victim, unit, and council are fully supported and the actions taken are properly documented.  All known or suspected abuse and significant youth protection policy infractions must be reported to the Scouts First Helpline after mandatory reporting to law enforcement or child protective services.

Responding to Abuse

When information regarding known or suspected abuse is first discovered, the following steps should immediately be taken by those responding:

  • Get the victim medical treatment, if required, and to a place of safety if needed
  • Ensure the victim(s) parents are notified as soon as possible
  • Notify law enforcement and/or child protective services
  • Call the Scouts First Helpline

Reporting Abuse or Youth Protection Violations

Accurate information is critical to an appropriate response; however, a lack of specific information is not a reason to delay a report of known or suspected abuse or significant youth protection policy violations. At a minimum, every effort should be made to have the following information available when reporting to the Scouts First Helpline:

  • The name, age, council, and unit of the alleged victim(s)
  • The name and phone number of the victim’s parent(s)
  • The name, age, council, and unit of any other known or suspected victim(s) and their parents contact information
  • The name, position, council, and unit of alleged perpetrator(s)
  • The name and phone number of the law enforcement or protective service agency to which the incident was reported
  • The name, unit, and council of any known witnesses
  • The name and phone number of the reporter
  • Details of the incident: who, what, where, and when

The reporter may also be asked to submit the information on a Youth Protection/Membership Incident Information Form (paper or online).

Hours of Operation

The Scouts First Helpline will be answered 24/7. The call may initially be answered by a person who gathers initial information and then escalates the report for further handling.

Questions or Concerns

Questions regarding the Scouts First Helpline and the above procedures should be directed to BSA Membership Standards at 972-580-2365 or 972-580-2007.

NOTE: The Scouts First Helpline is for reporting abuse or significant violations of the BSA’s youth protection policies only. While all youth protection policies must be taken seriously, minor, non-recurring infractions with no indication youth are at risk can be addressed at the unit level. Any other questions should continue to be directed to the BSA’s Member Care team at 972-580-2489.

Shop on Amazon Smile and Amazon will donate to the Sam Houston Area Council 

Posted by Darlene Scheffler Tuesday, October 24, 2017 1:08:00 PM

Amazon Smile

AmazonSmile is a perfect way to support the Sam Houston of America.

  • Amazon will donate 0.5% of the price of your eligible AmazonSmile purchases to Sam Houston Area Council, Boy Scouts of America whenever you shop on AmazonSmile.
  • AmazonSmile is the same Amazon you know. Same products, same prices, same service.
  • Support Sam Houston Area Council by starting your shopping at smile.amazon.com.

 

Sam Houston Area Council, Boy Scouts of America

Additional ways to help ensure the success of Scouting in the Sam Houston Area Council with meaningful gifts include: company matching gifts, company volunteer grants or by donating cars, trucks, RVs, trailers, boats, motors, stocks, bonds, mutual funds, securities, uniforms, camping equipment and yes, even services.

Never Miss a Post 

Posted by Darlene Scheffler Wednesday, July 12, 2017 6:09:00 PM

To keep up with the latest council news, like us on Facebook.

How to Never Miss a Post

Once you've liked our council's Facebook page, click on 'Following' and select 'See First.' Our posts will appear at the top of your News Feed no matter what time of day you visit Facebook.

Remember to follow your district's Facebook page as well. 

 

Help spread the word about Scouting on Facebook

 

Engage.

Click, like, comment, and share our posts. 

 

Mention the council in your posts. 

Type "@Sam Houston Area Council" and then select the council from the list that appears.

 

Share Memories.

Share your Scouting memories with us by sending photos and videos.  You can post them on our wall or send them to us as a message. You may just see them posted on our wall.

 

Invite Friends.

Invite your Scouting friends to Like our page. 

 

 

The Sam Houston Area Council is focusing on leveraging the power of communications through websites and on social media through Facebook.  The more Scouters share and repost, the more powerful our marketing can be.

Share your unit social media sites

While we are currently focused on Facebook, we have plans to expand to other types of social media. 

We are compiling a list of unit social media sites so we can work together to spread the word about Scouting by tagging, liking commenting and sharing each other posts. 

Would you like your unit website to be listed on your district website?  If so, please complete our social media survey.

Sam Houston Area Council
Social Media Channels

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  flickr icon  you tube icon

New Online Membership Registration 

Posted by Darlene Scheffler Thursday, March 9, 2017 3:49:00 AM

Great news!

Scouting families and prospective Scouting families have asked for it, and now it is here!

Beginning this fall, the traditional paper registration method will not be the only way to join Scouting. This is a giant leap forward in allowing prospective members and leaders to register in a way that's convenient for them, and it creates a more efficient and user-friendly registration experience for units, districts, and councils.

Beginning in April, a new online registration option will launch. This option will be convenient and safe and, because it offers greater efficiency, it will allow the ability to reach and serve more youth.  

All applications and payment of the registration fees can be completed online. This will eliminate the need for travel to the Cockrell Scout Center to turn in and pay for new applications.

More Information
 

Before You Start – Preparation Checklist

There are important steps you must take to prepare!

It is critical that you complete all items on the checklist for your Scouting role below to ensure you are granted the necessary permissions to work within the online registration system. Access to information, and the ability to take action within the system, is granted based on these permissions. To have the appropriate access, your role, council name, and a valid email address must be listed correctly in your my.scouting tools profile.

 

Training Videos 

 

How-To Files 

My.Scouting.org

One of the requirements to access online membership registration is the charter organization representative, unit leader and committee chairman must have a My.Scouting account. This account will allow approval online of all applications. When registering for an account a BSA member ID number is required. This number is found on BSA membership cards.  

Set up an My.Scouting Account 

Special Message to LDS Units

Units chartered to the LDS Church are automatically recognized in the online registration system. Your registration fees will continue to be paid directly by the Church headquarters in Salt Lake City. Therefore, your invoice should show a balance of $0.00 for registration fees.

However, families will be given the opportunity to purchase Boys' Life magazine, which is not covered by the Church and will be on the invoice at checkout for the family to pay.

Contacts, FAQs, Assistance

My.Scouting

  1. Visit the website 
  2. Contact Member Care Contact Center at myscouting@scouting.org or 972-580-2489


BSA member ID number

  1. Ask the unit leader or unit commissioner. They can access My.Scouting Tools and look up individual member IDs in the Member Manager tool. The member ID is also on a roster from Internet Advancement that's accessible under Menu/Legacy Web Tools/Internet Advancement.
  2. Contact Donna Burke at donna.burke@scouting.org or 713-756-3398 
  3. Contact the Member Care Contact Center: myscouting@scouting.org or 972-580-2489

Online registration

  1. Registration workflow
  2. FAQs
  3. Questions about the preparation checklist, contact the Member Care Contact Center at myscouting@scouting.org or 972-580-2489
  4. District executive

BeAScout.org

District website units page

  • Send updates to district webmaster (use website feedback form under the resources tab on district website)