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Winter NYLT Registration is Open 

Posted by Darlene Scheffler Saturday, July 15, 2017 7:19:00 AM

December 26 - 31, 2017

National Youth Leadership Training (NYLT) is an exciting, action-packed six-day council-level program designed to provide Boy Scouts and Venturers who are 13 years and older with leadership skills and experience they can use in their home units and in other situations demanding leadership of self and others. The first step in the BSA Youth Leadership Training continuum is conducted in the home unit. Boy Scouts, Varsity Scouts and Venturers who have 1) completed this training and 2) reached the age of thirteen but are not yet eighteen (for Venturers not yet twenty-one), may participate. NYLT is held in December and June.

Unit leaders have the primary responsibility for training their youth leaders. The purpose of NYLT is not to assume that role, but rather support it. The NYLT week is filled with activities, presentations, challenges, discussions, and camping in a team and model unit environment. Participants learn and practice skills that are valuable at home, church, school, work and the Scouting unit.

The course is designed for youth members 14 years of age. However, at a unit leader's discretion, they may approve a Scout at 13 years of age to attend NYLT. Since a Scout only takes this course once, we want them to get the maximum benefit from this experience; therefore, it is essential that they be able to handle the demands of this advanced course, which requires maturity, experience, and proficiency in basic camping skills.

At NYLT, a temporary training unit is formed consisting of youth from Venturing crews, Boy Scout troops and Varsity teams across the council. This training unit is instructed and led by a highly qualified group of outstanding youth and adult trainers. At the end of this conference, the Scout returns to their home unit with advanced knowledge of leadership skills and patrol/troop/team/crew operation. NYLT is held at Bovay Scout Ranch (3450 County Road 317, Navasota, TX 77868).

NYLT Flier

Requirements and Expectations

  1. Be at least 13 years of age, but not yet 18 by day one of the course. For Venturers, be at least 13, but not yet 21 by the end of the course.
  2. Live by the Scout Oath and the Scout Law at all times.
  3. Be able to attend the entire course: day one begins at 1:00 pm (check-in starts at noon) and day six ends around 4:00 PM
  4. Attend the mandatory orientation meeting.
  5. Unit leader approval

Orientation Meeting

December 3, 2017  |  1:00 - 4:00 pm

There is a mandatory orientation for all participants and every youth on the wait list. The orientation meeting is held at the Cockrell Scout Center (2225 North Loop West). Please arrive at least 30-minutes early to check in. Please have all fees and paperwork finalized before the orientation meeting in order to ensure a speedy check-in. All registered participants will receive an email with orientation registration instructions as the date nears. If you have questions about the orientation meeting, contact Lily Garrison at 713-756-3305.

Registration

The fee for NYLT training is $225. The fee includes two t-shirts and one neckerchief; extra t-shirts can be ordered. Payments of cash or check may be submitted but must be received at the Cockrell Scout Center (PO Box 924528, Houston, Texas 77292) within seven business days of online registration. Before registering, read the FAQs below before registering and have the unit leader information (name, address, phone, and email) available. For registration questions, please contact Lily Garrison at 713-756-3305. Courses fill up early.

Register

Registration is complete and the Scout's name is placed on the roster when the following have been completed:
  1. Online registration is submitted
  2. Fees paid in full
  3. Participant attends orientation meeting

Forms

What are the NYLT policies?
Fee Refunds - Refunds are in accordance with the council refund policy available at www.shac.org/forms#refunds.
Equipment Damage – Should council equipment or property be damaged by participants during the course, where damage occurs from other than normal or expected use, it shall be the responsibility of the participant(s) involved (and their guardians) to pay for the cost of the damage.
Course Completion – To successfully complete the course and receive the certificate and patch, a participant must attend the full course including closing ceremony.  Anyone arriving late or leaving the course early will not be eligible for completion.
Medication – All medication containers must be labeled with participant’s name, medication name, dosage & schedule for the medication.  Send only enough medication for the course duration.  Most pharmacies will prepare a second container for you with the prescription label so only the required medication can be sent with the Scout. In addition, please complete the Medication Form above.  Each participant may keep inhalers and sting kits.
Rescheduling - Your placement in a course if for that course and week only. If a scheduling conflict develops, and you wish to move to another course and week, we will make every effort to accommodate that request. However, if the other course has a waitlist, you will be placed at the bottom of that wait list as a new registrant. We will not remove a confirmed registrant from a course to replace them with a transfer request. All requests must be in writing. You may send an email request to Lily.Garrison@scouting.org.
What should be brought to NYLT?

Required Personal Items:

  • Complete BSA Field Uniform: Boy Scout: khaki/ Venturing: green shirt, gray pant; Sea Scouts: chambray
    • Uniform shirt with proper patches (1 to 2)
    • Uniform pants or shorts (1 to 2)
    • Uniform socks (3 pair)
    • Uniform BSA belt and buckle
  • Shoes: 2 pair (1 pair suitable for hiking and 1 extra pair; no open-toed or sandals except shower shoes)
  • Rain suit or poncho
  • Light jacket in summer, heavy jacket in winter
  • Change of clothing: pants, shirts, underwear, socks
  • Backpack for all gear (no footlockers/suitcases)
  • Sleeping bag
  • Ground cloth
  • Lightweight tent for camping (10'x10' or smaller)
  • Water bottle or canteen (2)
  • Mess kit: plate, bowl, cup, knife, spoon
  • Flashlight (spare batteries & bulb)
  • Compass
  • Boy Scout knife (no sheath knives)
  • Chapstick, sun screen, insect repellent (no aerosol)
  • Prescribed or required medication in ziplock bag with name on bag (only enough for the 6 days) – left with adult staff member
  • Pens or pencils/notepad
  • Winter courses:  warm jacket and sweatshirt or sweater
  • Annual Medical and Medical Record, Parts A, B, C

Each participant will receive two NYLT t-shirts during check-in

Recommended Personal Gear:

  • Foam sleeping pad
  • Bathing - 2 towels, soap/container (a ziplock works)
  • Hygiene products:  toothpaste, toothbrush, soap, deodorant, comb, etc.
  • Powder to prevent chaffing (e.g. Gold Bond)
  • Personal first aid kit – basic – band aids, etc.
  • Watch/alarm clock

Optional Personal Gear:

  • Small rug or mat for tent floor
  • Pillow
  • Sewing/repair kit
  • Clothesline/clothespins
  • Sunglasses
  • Camera ( no cell phones)
  • Musical instrument (no electronics)
  • Shower shoes (don't have to be closed toed)
  • Religious book(s)

Please do not bring food, electronics (cell phone, game devices), hiking staves or poles, matches, lighters or any item that results in fire. Merit badge and OA sashes are not needed.  Mark  all personal gear and equipment with youth’s name. Count the number of large items left with the youth and be sure you have the same number of items on pickup day.

All clothing must be "Scout appropriate" meaning t-shirts and caps with Scouting themes from activities such as summer camp, Camporees, high adventure outings and also troop-specific wear are appropriate. Clothing which promotes businesses, entertainment groups/individuals, sports or teams, or schools and etc. are not appropriate for this course.
 

Remember: “Dress for the weather. Pack for the season.”

What are the NYLT course objectives?
NYLT objectives:
1. Give participants the confidence and knowledge to conduct the troop program.
2. Provide participants with a clear understanding of team and personal development and how those elements relate to being a leader.
3. Guide the participants through the stages of team development.
4. Create an environment of Scouting fellowship and fun guided by the Scout Oath and the Scout Law.
5. Give participants the opportunity to share ideas and experiences with Scouts from other troops and teams.
6. Have fun and experience Scouting at its best.
What is the course overview?
The course models a month in the life of a unit – three meetings (one each day for the first three days) leading to a big outdoor experience (an overnight outpost camp). The course uses the patrol method and presents model leader council meetings.

The training unit challenges the youth early in the week to present their "Quest for the Meaning of Leadership" at the end of the week. The challenge is designed to have them go through the four stages of team development. This gives teams and individual Scouts hands-on, practical application of the leadership skills and concepts presented to them during the course.

Throughout the course, the staff models the concepts and skills that are the core content of the course. The focus of the course is to fill the Scout's “Toolbox of Leadership Skills” with knowledge, practice, and understanding of when and how to use these skills.

The course begins with the teams finding their team vision and ends with the individuals refining a personal vision of how to put the skills learned into action at their home unit.
What does the course fee cover?

The fee provides for all meals (dinner day one through lunch on day 6), program material, facility expenses, program equipment, insurance, two NYLT t-shirts, patrol cap, and NYLT notebook.

Do I have to attend the orientation session?
Yes. If there is a wait list for a course, then Scouts who are registered for a course but do not attend the orientation will lose their place on that course. This creates an open position, which will be filled by a Scout on the wait list who has attended orientation
What type of tents will be used during the course?

The participants will bring their own lightweight tent (10'x10' or smaller) This may be the same tent used for the outpost hike.

Why does each Scout have to bring a backpacking tent? Can several Scouts from the same troop share the same tent?

The tent is used for one night of the program called the outpost camp. This outpost camp is by patrol. Patrol assignments are made to enhance learning during the course. Consequently, in most cases participants will not be in patrols with anyone from their home.

What merit badges will be offered?

The purpose of NYLT is leadership training in the context of a model troop and patrol. No merit badges will be offered.

When is parent’s night?

The five and a half day schedule of NYLT is very full, from early morning until bed time each night. There are no scheduled times for parental visits.

Can Venturers and Sea Scouts attend NYLT?

Venturers and Sea Scouts, both male and female, meeting the age requirements (13-20) may apply for the course. To ensure privacy and high Scouting standards, strict coed camping rules will be enforced.

Are scholarships available?
A limited number of partial fee scholarships are available.  Scholarships are granted based on need.

The participant needs to register online and choose the mail box option when checking out; then submit a scholarship request. Scholarships must be applied for and approved prior to the registration becoming final.

NYLT Staff

After participation in an NYLT course, a Scout may apply to serve on staff. If you enjoyed NYLT, and you want to make sure other Scouts have the same rewarding experience, then staffing may be for you. It is a lot of fun, but also requires dedication to hard work and preparation. Conducting a National Youth Leadership Training course takes a great deal of planning, plenty of inspiration, and the enthusiastic participation of many dedicated people. The rewards for participants, staff, and the Scouting movement are tremendous.

There are opportunities for those who have completed the course to become a staff member for NYLT. If Scouts are still active in Scouting, are highly motivated, are hard working, and would like to be considered for a position on a future NYLT staff, they may sign up for a youth staff search interview.

NYLT Staff Information       

 

NYLT Contacts

Karen Stancik
NYLT Coordinator
 nylt.shac@gmail.com

Lily Garrison
NYLT Registration
 (713) 756-3305
Lily.Garrison@scouting.org

 

Nathan Doherty
Program Director
 (713) 756-3308
 nathan.doherty@scouting.org

Never Miss a Post 

Posted by Darlene Scheffler Wednesday, July 12, 2017 6:09:00 PM

To keep up with the latest council news, like us on Facebook.

How to Never Miss a Post

Once you've liked our council's Facebook page, click the arrow next to the "Liked" button and select "See First" under "In Your News Feed." This way, you'll always see our latest posts and Scouting news at the top of your timeline - no matter what time of day you visit Facebook.

Help spread the word about Scouting on Facebook

 

Engage.

Click, like, comment, and share our posts. 

 

Mention the council in your posts. 

Type "@Sam Houston Area Council" and then select the council from the list that appears.

 

Share Memories.

Share your Scouting memories with us by sending photos and videos.  You can post them on our wall or send them to us as a message. You may just see them posted on our wall.

 

Invite Friends.

Invite your Scouting friends to Like our page. 

 

 

The Sam Houston Area Council is focusing on leveraging the power of communications through websites and on social media through Facebook.  The more Scouters share and repost, the more powerful our marketing can be.

Share your unit social media sites

While we are currently focused on Facebook, we have plans to expand to other types of social media. 

We are compiling a list of unit social media sites so we can work together to spread the word about Scouting by tagging, liking commenting and sharing each other posts. 

Would you like your unit website to be listed on your district website?  If so, please complete our social media survey.

Sam Houston Area Council
Social Media Channels

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2017 Guide to Advancement Released 

Posted by Darlene Scheffler Wednesday, July 12, 2017 6:37:00 AM

Guide to Advancement coverThe Guide to Advancement is the official source for administering advancement in helps Scouters understand and implement the advancement programs and procedures of the Boy Scouts of America: Cub Scouting, Boy Scouting, Varsity Scouting, Venturing, and Sea Scouts. 

The Guide to Advancement was recently updated. Read about the significant changes on pages 7-9. 

Policies and procedures outlined in the Guide to Safe Scouting apply to all BSA activities, including those related to advancement and Eagle Scout service projects.

Additional information and best practices appear in other official BSA resources such as BSA Advancement Newsthe national Advancement Team’s Twitter feed, and the advancement educational presentations released by the national Advancement Committee. The latest advancement resources can be found on the BSA advancement resources page

Units enter youth advancements, awards, and merit badges utilizing internet advancement.

 

 

Contacts

For additional information, contact your district advancement chair.​

Boy Scout Camping Requirement Changes 

Posted by Darlene Scheffler Wednesday, July 12, 2017 6:11:00 AM

Revised campout requirements for Second Class, First Class take effect Aug. 1, 2017

Source, Scouting Magazine

The number of overnight campouts required for a young man to earn the Second Class and First Class ranks will be reduced under new requirements that take effect Aug. 1, 2017.

But the total number of camping nights a Boy Scout will experience in the program as he progresses toward the rank of Eagle Scout will not change.

In 2016, alongside the release of the 13th edition of the Boy Scout Handbook, the BSA increased the number of campouts required for Second Class to three since joining from two. It increased the number of campouts required for First Class to six since joining from three.

The Aug. 1, 2017, revisions return the number of overnight campouts to pre-2016 levels but preserve the amount of time spent outdoors. The change, the BSA says, maintains a focus on life-changing outdoors experiences while recognizing that not all outdoor activities need to include overnight camping.

Hikes, service projects and outdoor-heavy merit badges like Geocaching and Orienteering add to the adventure of being a first-year Scout.

The changes leave untouched the Eagle-required Camping merit badge, which calls for at least 20 nights of camping. Because all camping nights since becoming a Scout can be used for this requirement — even those that count toward Second Class and First Class — the effect is that the total number of camping nights required to become an Eagle Scout is unchanged.

And of course, these are minimum overnight campout requirements. Many Scouts will choose to camp more frequently.

What’s the change?  

Rank Current Requirement  New Requirement as of Aug. 1, 2017
Second Class 1a. Since joining, participate in five separate troop/patrol activities, three of which include overnight camping.  These five activities do not include troop or patrol meetings.  On at least two of the three campouts, spend the night in a tent that you pitch or other structure that you help erect (such as a lean-to, snow cave, or tepee). 1a. Since joining Boy Scouts, participate in five separate troop/patrol activities, at least three of which must be held outdoors.  Of the outdoor activities, at least two must include overnight camping.  These activities do not include troop or patrol meetings.  On campouts, spend the night in a tent that you pitch or other structure that you help erect, such as a lean-to, snow cave, or tepee.
First Class 1a. Since joining, participate in 10 separate troop/patrol activities, six of which include overnight camping.  These 10 activities do not include troop or patrol meetings.  On at least five of the six campouts, spend the night in a tent that you pitch or other structure that you help erect (such as a lean-to, snow cave, or tepee). 1a. Since joining Boy Scouts, participate in 10 separate troop/patrol activities, at least six of which must be held outdoors.  Of the outdoor activities, at least three must include overnight camping.  These activities do not include troop or patrol meetings.  On campouts, spend the night in a tent that you pitch or other structure that you help erect, such as a lean-to, snow cave, or tepee.

When do the changes take effect?

Aug. 1, 2017.

Can I still use the old requirements?

Generally, yes. Whenever there are requirement changes after the release of the Boy Scout Requirements Book or the Boy Scout Handbook, the Scout has until the following Jan. 1 to decide what to do (see Guide to Advancement topic 4.0.0.1).

It is the Scout’s decision.

In this specific case, a Scout choosing to use the old requirements would, in doing so, fulfill the new requirement.

What about Star, Life and Eagle?

There aren’t camping requirements for those ranks, because to become an Eagle Scout a young man must earn the Camping merit badge, which has its own camping requirements.

Requirement 9a for the Camping merit badge states:

Camp a total of at least 20 nights at designated Scouting activities or events. One long-term camping experience of up to six consecutive nights may be applied toward this requirement. Sleep each night under the sky or in a tent you have pitched. If the camp provides a tent that has already been pitched, you need not pitch your own tent.

All campouts since becoming a Boy Scout or Varsity Scout may count toward this requirement, including those used to fulfill the requirements for Tenderfoot, Second Class and First Class.

Contacts

For additional information, contact your district advancement chair.

Eagle Palm Changes 

Posted by Darlene Scheffler Monday, July 10, 2017 11:47:00 PM

The way Scouts earn Eagle Palms is about to change

Source: Scouting Magazine

Eagle Palms are bronze, gold and silver awards presented to young men who earn five, 10, 15 or more merit badges beyond the 21 required to become an Eagle Scout.

This week, the BSA has announced significant changes to the way Scouts earn Eagle Palms. The modifications take effect Aug. 1, 2017.

The changes bring Eagle Palm requirements in line with the needs of older Scouts. The National Boy Scouting Subcommittee has eliminated unnecessary obstacles, such as the Eagle Palm board of review, and expanded the definition of active participation.

But the biggest change affects young men who haven’t yet earned Eagle. Beginning Aug. 1, all earned Palms may be awarded instantly to new Eagle Scouts at their Eagle court of honor. This abolishes the wait of months or years for these young men to receive all Palms available to them.

Here’s a look at what’s changing. Below that, an in-depth guide to the new Eagle Palm requirements.

What’s changing?

  1. A new Eagle Scout can instantly receive, alongside his Eagle medal, all Eagle Palms he has earned for merit badges completed before he became an Eagle Scout. These Palms recognize additional merit badges earned before completing the Eagle board of review. Previously, an Eagle Scout needed to wait three months between each Palm — even if he earned the extra merit badges before becoming an Eagle. This meant that, under the old rules, a young man who became an Eagle Scout at 17 years and 10 months, was mathematically unable to earn any Eagle Palms.
    • Example: Glenn, a 16-year-old Life Scout, has 36 merit badges at the time of his Eagle Scout board of review — 15 more than required. Previously, he would’ve needed to wait three months after his Eagle board of review to receive his Bronze Palm, another three months for his Gold Palm and another three for his Silver Palm. Under the new rules, he can get that Silver Palm (representing 15 additional merit badges) along with his Eagle medal at his Eagle Scout court of honor. No wait required.
    • Note: After becoming an Eagle Scout and receiving the Palms already earned, additional Palms may be earned by completing the revised requirements, including the three months tenure between awarding each Palm.
  2. The three-month tenure requirement has been expanded to allow active participation in any BSA program — not just the troop and patrol.
    • This recognizes that as some Scouts get older, their Scouting participation shifts to the Order of the Arrow, summer camp staff or elsewhere.
  3. The leadership requirement has been broadened to include “accepting responsibility” as well as “demonstrating leadership.”
  4. The Eagle Palm board of review has been eliminated.
    • Eagle Palms are not ranks, so the Eagle Palm board of review was seen as an unnecessary step. A unit leader conference is deemed to be sufficient and may be conducted at any time during the tenure requirement.

Eagle Palms: the official requirements

These are effective Aug. 1, 2017.

After successfully completing your Eagle Scout board of review and being validated as an Eagle Scout by the National Service Center, you will be entitled to receive an Eagle Palm for each additional 5 merit badges you have completed before your Eagle Scout board of review. For these Palms only, it will not be necessary for you to complete any of the requirements stated below.

After becoming an Eagle Scout, you may earn additional Palms by completing the following requirements.

  1. Be active in the Boy Scouts of America for at least three months after becoming an Eagle Scout or after the last Palm was earned. **
  2. Since earning the Eagle Scout rank or your last Eagle Palm, demonstrate Scout spirit by living the Scout Oath and Scout Law. Tell how you have done your duty to God and how you have lived the Scout Oath and Scout Law in your everyday life.
  3. Continue to set a satisfactory example of accepting responsibility or demonstrating leadership ability.
  4. Earn five additional merit badges beyond those required for Eagle or last Palm. ***
  5. While an Eagle Scout, participate in a Scoutmaster conference. *

Notes

*For Varsity Scouts working on Boy Scout requirements, replace “Scoutmaster” with “Varsity Scout Coach.” For Venturers working on Boy Scout requirements, replace “Scoutmaster” with “crew Advisor.”  For Sea Scouts working on Boy Scout requirements, replace “Scoutmaster” with “Skipper.”

**Eagle Palms must be earned in sequence, and the three-month tenure requirement must be observed for each Palm.

***Merit badges earned any time since becoming a Boy Scout may be used to meet this requirement.

Eagle Palms: the official requirements, annotated

Here are those same requirements annotated.

  • The new requirements are in blue. Remember, these take effect Aug. 1, 2017.
  • The old requirements are noted.
  • Notes in italics explain why each change was made. The text comes from the National Boy Scouting Subcommittee.

After successfully completing your Eagle Scout board of review and being validated as an Eagle Scout by the National Service Center, you will be entitled to receive an Eagle Palm for each additional 5 merit badges you have completed before your Eagle Scout board of review. For these Palms only, it will not be necessary for you to complete any of the requirements stated below.

By implementing this proposal, a Scout can be recognized with an Eagle Palm(s) for the extra work he has put into earning merit badges and acquiring additional education prior to earning the rank of Eagle Scout regardless of his age at the time he earns the rank of Eagle Scout. If the Eagle Scout has sufficient time remaining before his 18th birthday, he can then continue to earn additional Eagle Palms by completing the following proposed requirements.

After becoming an Eagle Scout, you may earn additional Palms by completing the following requirements.

1. (new requirement) Be active in the Boy Scouts of America for at least three months after becoming an Eagle Scout or after the last Palm was earned. 

1. (old requirement) Be active in your troop and patrol for at least three months after becoming an Eagle Scout or after award of last Palm

Requirement 1 has been changed to include being active in the “Boy Scouts of America” instead of just “troop and patrol.” This allows a Scout to receive active participation time credit for programs such as the OA, Venturing, serving on camp staff, NYLT and NAYLE staff etc. In addition, participation in positive non-Scouting activities can be given consideration, as explained in topic 4.2.3.1 of the Guide to Advancement. This significantly broadens the opportunity for Scouts to stay involved in Scouting or other character-building activities and receive consideration toward earning additional Palms after earning the rank of Eagle Scout.

2. Since earning the Eagle Scout rank or your last Eagle Palm, demonstrate Scout spirit by living the Scout Oath and Scout Law. Tell how you have done your duty to God and how you have lived the Scout Oath and Scout Law in your everyday life.

Requirement 2 is unchanged.

3. (new requirement) Continue to set a satisfactory example of accepting responsibility or demonstrating leadership ability.

3. Make a satisfactory effort to develop and demonstrate leadership ability.

Requirement 3 has been updated to include accepting responsibility as well as demonstrating leadership ability. This is not as restrictive as the current requirement, which focuses only on leadership. It is reasonable to make this change because Scouts can achieve Eagle Scout rank by serving in a position of responsibility rather than just serving in a leadership position. Accepting responsibility or demonstrating leadership should be sufficient. If a young man demonstrates leadership, we can assume that at some point he developed it.

4. Earn five additional merit badges beyond those required for Eagle or last Palm.

Requirement 4 is unchanged.

5. While an Eagle Scout, participate in a Scoutmaster conference.

Requirement 5 is unchanged, expect for the addition of this footnote: For Varsity Scouts working on Boy Scout requirements replace “Scoutmaster” with “Varsity Scout Coach.” For Venturers working on Boy Scout requirements replace “Scoutmaster” with “crew Advisor.” For Sea Scouts working on Boy Scout requirements replace “Scoutmaster” with “Skipper.”

6. (new requirement) There isn’t a No. 6 under the new requirements.

6. (old requirement) Successfully complete your board of review for the Eagle Palm.

Requirement 6 has been eliminated. A Palm is an award to recognize achievement beyond the rank of Eagle Scout. It is not a rank itself, so it is not necessary to have a board of review. It also generates confusion, becomes a barrier to recognition because delays can result in a Scout being short of time to earn another Palm, and is one more duty for a unit advancement committee which should be devoting more attention to building advancement throughout the unit. These are Eagle Scouts; they’ve already reached the pinnacle. They represent youth with whom we have most likely already achieved our aims. Approval of the unit leader is sufficient.

The right way to wear a combination of palms

The Bronze Palm represents the first five merit badges beyond the 21 required for Eagle. The Gold Palm represents the next five (10 total), and the Silver Palm the third five (15 total).

After that, you’ll combine multiple Palms. While qualifying Eagle Scouts can wear multiple Silver Palms, they should never wear more than 1 Bronze or 1 Gold Palm. You’ll see why in this handy chart that shows the proper Palm combinations.

Total number of merit badges  Number beyond minimum  Palm combination
21 0 None
26 5 1 Bronze
31 10 1 Gold
36 15 1 Silver
41 20 1 Bronze, 1 Silver
46 25 1 Gold, 1 Silver
51 30 2 Silver
56 35 1 Bronze, 2 Silver
61 40 1 Gold, 2 Silver
66 45 3 Silver
71 50 1 Bronze, 3 Silver
76 55 1 Gold, 3 Silver
81 60 4 Silver
86 65 1 Bronze, 4 Silver
91 70 1 Gold, 4 Silver
96 75 5 Silver
101 80 1 Bronze, 5 Silver
106 85 1 Gold, 5 Silver
111 90 6 Silver
116 95 1 Bronze, 6 Silver
121 100 1 Gold, 6 Silver
126 105 7 Silver
131 110 1 Bronze, 7 Silver
136 115 1 Gold, 7 Silver

Answers to your questions about the changes

Following are some questions and answers regarding the new requirements. These were provided by the National Boy Scouting Subcommittee.

Q: Why were these changes made at this time?

A: The BSA has a longstanding policy and tradition of quickly recognizing Scouts for their achievements. In the case of Eagle Palms, many Scouts were not receiving any recognition for the extra work they were doing by earning additional merit badges.

Q: Why are these requirement changes being implemented immediately instead of waiting until the Boy Scout Requirements book is published in 2018?

A: This is consistent with any other requirement change introduced mid-year. The intent is to allow the greater flexibility of the new requirements to be used as soon as possible so more Scouts can take advantage of them.

Q: Can a Scout who completed his Eagle Scout board of review before Aug. 1 go back and receive Palms for merit badges he has already completed?

A: No, the change to allow awarding Palms as described above is not retroactive. If the Scout still has eligibility remaining, he may continue to earn Palms by completing the new requirements.

Q: Other than having completed at least five additional merit badges before his Eagle board of review, does a Scout have to complete any additional requirements for a Palm to be awarded immediately after he is validated as an Eagle Scout?

A: No, there are no additional requirements to complete if a Scout is to receive Eagle Palms based on the merit badges he earned before his Eagle Scout Board of Review.

Q: After becoming an Eagle Scout and receiving any Eagle Palms he might be entitled to, how does a Scout earn additional Palms?

A: By completing the revised requirements.

Q: Is there a limit to the number of Eagle Palms a Scout can immediately qualify for following his Eagle Scout board of review and verification by the National Service Center?

A: No limit. So long as the Scout has completed the required number of merit badges, he may apply to receive the equivalent number of Palms.

Q: How does the Scout apply to obtain any Palms he might be entitled to receive?

A: Eagle Palms may be reported by the unit leader submitting an Advancement Report No. 34403, making the appropriate entry via Internet Advancement, or via Scoutbook once the option is available. The Eagle Scout Palm Application, form # 58-709, was previously discontinued since it is not necessary for Eagle Palms to be processed or approved at the council level.

Q: Why was “… be active in your troop and patrol” replaced with “… be active in the Boy Scouts of America…”?

A: This requirement was broadened to recognize that Eagle Scouts have many positive character-building activities that they can participate in both in and out of Scouting. Those activities should be considered when reviewing this requirement. See Guide to Advancement topic 4.2.3.1 “Active Participation” for an in-depth explanation of active participation.

Q: What does the phrase “accepting responsibility or demonstrating leadership ability” mean?

A: A Scout can meet this requirement by accepting responsibility or demonstrating leadership in many ways in or out of Scouting. For example, he could perform a Scoutmaster-assigned project or be an active leader in district or council activities, serve as a lodge officer in the Order of the Arrow, or even serve on camp staff. A Scout could also meet this requirement by accepting responsibility or serving in a leadership position on their sports team, as a student council officer, accepting responsibilities in other youth or church organizations, or in a myriad of other positive activities outside of Scouting.

Q: If a Scout has earned a total of 25 merit badges but doesn’t complete one more merit badge before his Eagle Scout board of review, will he have to wait until three months after his board of review to earn an Eagle Palm?

A: Yes, he must wait. Only the required number of merit badges earned prior to his Eagle Scout board of review may be considered when awarding Palms immediately following the board of review.

Q: A 17 year old Scout, who has earned 24 merit badges, has completed all his Eagle rank requirements but has not yet had his Eagle Scout board of review. If he earns two more merit badge before his Eagle board of review can he receive a Palm at that time or does he have to wait?

A: So long as he completes the two additional merit badges before his Eagle Scout board of review, the Scout can immediately receive a Bronze Palm.

Q: Four months before his 18th birthday a Scout successfully completed his Eagle board of review with a total of only 21 merit badges although he had numerous partials he was working on. After his board of review he completed 10 additional merit badges. Can he receive a Bronze and a Gold Palm at the end of the three months?

A: After the Eagle board of review, the Scout must meet all the requirements, including three months tenure between each Palm. In this case he is only eligible to receive a Bronze Palm.

Q: If a Scout who has earned 25 merit badges has passed his 18th birthday but has not yet had his Eagle Scout board of review, can he complete one more merit badge before his board of review to receive a Palm.

A: All merit badge work must be completed before the Scout’s 18th birthday.

Q: Why was the board of review requirement for Eagle Palms eliminated?

A: Eagle Palms are not a rank and thus don’t need a formal board of review. Also, in some cases, scheduling boards of review had become a barrier to earning additional Eagle Palms. The Scoutmaster’s conference is deemed sufficient since it can be conducted anytime during the three-month tenure period.

Q: Palms can be an important part of keeping a Scout involved in Scouting after they have earned Eagle Scout rank. Do the new requirements eliminate any incentive for them to stay in the program?

A: The new requirements provide recognition for the work a Scout has already done while providing the opportunity for Scouts who have time before their 18th birthday to earn additional Palms. Eagle Palms are only one small part of an exciting and engaging program which is what really keeps Eagle Scouts motivated to stay active in Scouting.

Where to buy and wear Eagle Palms

Buy them at your local Scout Shop. Eagle Palms are restricted items, meaning you must submit the required paperwork.

As for wearing them, you have three options:

  1. On the Eagle Scout square knot, which is worn by adult Scouters.
  2. Attached to the ribbon of the Eagle Scout medal, which is worn on special occasions by youth and adults.
  3. On the Eagle Scout rank emblem (patch), which is sewn on the youth field uniform.

 

Contacts

For additional information, contact your district advancement chair.​

Sign-Up for Show-n-Sell 

Posted by Darlene Scheffler Tuesday, July 4, 2017 9:52:00 AM

Ways to Sell Popcorn

Hundreds of thousands of dollars go back to the Scouting program in the Sam Houston Area Council as a result of the annual popcorn sale. 73% of all dollars collected during the sale support local Scouting. The popcorn sale is a way for a Scout to support his or her way through the various activities during the year.  There are three ways to sell popcorn: show-n-sell, traditional take order sales, and selling online to friends and family out of town:

   Learn More

Show-n-Sell

Show-n-sell is similar to take order sales, except Scouts have the popcorn in hand to sell to customers. All units are eligible to participate if they agree to the terms stated in the commitment order form. Dens, packs or troops can request permission to sell in front of a retail store or chartered organization. Units must agree to use show-n-sell to grow and not replace traditional take order sales.There are four bundle options that can net units between $500 and $3,600. Order and sell multiple bundles to increase unit profits! There is little risk as any unsold popcorn is rolled into traditional sales.

Show-n-sell popcorn is picked up on August 15, 2017, at location TBD. Pick up times: TBD. The show-n-sell campaign runs from August 15 - October 1, 2017. Sign-up by August 1, 2017.

Sign-up for Show-n-Sell

Traditional Take Order Sales and Online Popcorn Sales ​

Take order sales are the most traditional way to sell popcorn. Scouts go door-to-door with the take order form received from your leader after unit kick off on August 15 through October 28, 2017. Customers choose the product(s) he or she wishes to buy and writes the order on the order form. Scouts should collect the money when the popcorn is ordered (checks should be made out to the unit). Popcorn will be picked up by units on November 18, 2017.

Sign-up for Traditional and Online Sales

Selling online is the best way to sell to friends and family who live far away. Online sales count toward Scout rewards including the $650 club, $1800 club and scholarship program. Participants can send emails to friends and family asking them to purchase products online. The email includes a link allowing them to begin shopping right away. Customers can pay with a credit card, and the products are shipped directly to the customer. The advantages of online sales are that the Scout doesn't have to collect money or deliver products. Online sales run from August 1 to November 18, 2017.

New for this year, units that sign up to sell popcorn by June 30th will receive a free drone! Also, units that sell over $12,000 will receive free home popcorn delivery.

Why Sell?

• Increase your unit and council income – 73% stays in the local area.
• Scouts pay for their way for various Scouting programs and activities.
• Scouts learn life lessons by earning their own way.
• There are loads of incentives to motivate Scouts: cool prizes, $600 club, $1800 club. 


 

Contacts

For more information, contact your district popcorn kernel or district executive.

Popcorn Project Coordinator
 (713) 756-3374
popcorn@shac.org

Tony Hensdill
Field Development Director
 (713) 756-3374
 tony.hensdill@scouting.org

 

 

 

 

Sea Scouts Minto Rendezvous 

Posted by Darlene Scheffler Wednesday, June 28, 2017 10:00:00 AM

September 8-10, 2017

Minto Rendezvous is an annual regional event where Sea Scouts test their knowledge and skills. The competition includes over 20 events that test a ship’s teamwork, training and preparation in a variety of nautical-related events.  Some events such as navigation, first aid, knot tying relays and marlin spike require study and practice.  Other events like blindfold canoe race and no paddle canoe race require luck and laughter to run the course.

Ships from all across Texas and Oklahoma look forward to the fun and fellowship.  The highlight of the weekend is the annual Flotsam Flotilla race of homemade vessels made from a variety of materials. The event is being held at Bovay Scout Ranch (3450 County Road 317, Navasota, TX 77868).

Registration

The registration fee is $55 per person.

T-shirts can be ordered for $10. T-shirts must be ordered by September 1, 2017. At checkout, pay with a credit card, electronic check, or PayPal. Council refund policy.

The early registration fee is $45 per person until August 15, 2017. Onsite registration is $60. 

Register     Boarding Manual      SHAC Sea Scouts Website

 

About Sea Scouts

Welcome aboard—to the fun and adventure of Sea Scouts, a program combining the traditions of the past with the technology of the future. Whether you look to the sea for a career or lifelong hobby, Sea Scouts is for you.

SHAC Sea Scouts Website

The element of water makes Sea Scouts unique. Sea Scout units use a variety of boats, from outboard motorboats to large sailing yachts. Sea Scouts belong to a world that is distinct from anything on shore, and they have their own language and customs.  The water is not a place for the unwary, and the Scout motto, "Be Prepared," is imperative. The challenge is taking a vessel from point A to point B while being ready for whatever may be encountered along the way. Crewing a vessel involves sharing the duties of the helmsman, navigator, lookout, cook, sail handler, or engineer. Outings on a boat offer new destinations in the morning and the changing scenery of a new harbor by evening. Every event is an adventure.

 

Sea Scout programs are run by the youth members. Elected officers plan and conduct the program. Being part of the vessel's crew teaches teamwork. As experience is gained, more opportunities arise to contribute to the leadership of the unit. At quarterdeck meetings, ship's officers work together to plan and evaluate the ship's program. Leadership skills learned in Sea Scouts last a lifetime.

Sea Scouts give service to others. Sea Scouts have been of service to hundreds of communities across the nation. Service can be expressed in individual good turns to others or in organized projects involving the crew or the whole ship. In rescues at sea, or facing emergencies on shore, Sea Scouts have saved lives and property. Sea Scout service puts citizenship into action.

Sea Scout advancement rewards individual pursuits of excellence. Each level of advancement marks growth as a seaman and a leader. The highest rank a Sea Scout can earn is the prestigious Quartermaster rank.

Seafaring has traditions that go back hundreds of years. Sea Scouts have adapted these traditions to the Sea Scout program and have created traditions of their own.

A youth must be 13 years of age and graduated from the eighth grade or be 14 to join Sea Scouts. You can stay in Sea Scouts until you are 21 years of age.  Sea Scout ships can be located by contacting the Boy Scouts of America in your area. If there is not a ship nearby, encourage parents, school, church, or community organizations to organize one.

 
 

 

 

 

 

Venturing Banquet 

Posted by Darlene Scheffler Wednesday, June 28, 2017 9:53:00 AM

August 12, 2017  |  6:30 - 8:30 pm
Cockrell Scout Center

The Venturing Banquet is the annual awards banquet where Venturers and leadership will be presented with recognition for their work in the Venturing.

Bring a pinewood derby car to compete for the fastest car or best art car. Cars that want to race will have to meet pinewood derby regulations. 

Before the banquet, Venturing Officer Association (VOA) elections will be held for the offices of council Venturing president, vice-president of program, and vice-president of administration. The elections procedures are outlined in the VOA by-laws. If you are interested in running for office, submit a nomination form.

Registration

Tickets are $18 per person. After 8/6/17, there is a $7 late fee.

Register

About Venturing

Venturing is a youth development program in Sam Houston Area Council for young men and women 14 years of age (and in the 9th grade) through 20 years old. Venturing provides positive experiences to help young people mature and become responsible and caring adults. The program offers fun and challenging activities that promote character development, citizenship, and physical fitness. Sea Scouts is a youth development program for young men and women 14 years of age (and in the 9th grade) through 20 years old with a special interest in aquatic activities.

Each Venturing crew has its own special interest, often including (but not limited to) outdoors activities, sports, arts and hobbies, religious life, or aquatics. These activities, plus service projects, ceremonies, and friendly competition, help youth to learn the core values and give them a sense of personal achievement. Consultants from the community play an important part in Venturing. Through positive peer group interaction and adult mentoring, youth also learn honesty, responsibility, and respect.

Venturing crews can be coed, all-male, or all-female. The chartered organization and the leadership make that decision. The special interest is determined by the chartered organization and by the interests and capabilities of the youth and adults in the crew or ship.

Learn More

 

 

 

 

Sign up for Popcorn 

Posted by Darlene Scheffler Tuesday, June 6, 2017 7:57:00 AM

Hundreds of thousands of dollars go back to the Scouting program in the Sam Houston Area Council as a result of the annual popcorn sale. 73% of all dollars collected during the sale support local Scouting. The popcorn sale is a way for a Scout to support his or her way through the various activities during the year. There are three options to sell popcorn: traditional take order sales, sell online to friends and family out of town and show-n-sell. For more information, contact your district popcorn kernel or district executive.

Sign-up for Traditional and Online Sales          Sign-up for Show-n-Sell          Learn More

New for this year, units that sign up to sell popcorn by June 30th will receive a free drone! Also, units that sell over $12,000 will receive free home popcorn delivery.

 

Why Sell?

• Increase your unit and council income – 73% stays in the local area.
• Scouts pay for their way for various Scouting programs and activities.
• Scouts learn life lessons by earning their own way.
• There are loads of incentives to motivate Scouts: cool prizes, $600 club, $1800 club. 


Contacts

For more information, contact your district popcorn kernel or district executive.

Popcorn Project Coordinator
 (713) 756-3374
popcorn@shac.org

Tony Hensdill
Field Development Director
 (713) 756-3374
 tony.hensdill@scouting.org

 

 

 

 

Camp Development March 2017 Update 

Posted by Darlene Scheffler Friday, March 24, 2017 10:00:00 AM

Camp Development for the 21st Century

March 2017 Update

The Sam Houston Area Council (“council”) has the vision to become a leader in camping by having first-class facilities that are well maintained and provide safe, fun and educational outdoor programs for our Scouts.  In 2012, the council approved a new Camping Vision Statement: Exemplary, Sustainable Outdoor Experiences and Creative Learning for 21st Century Youth and Their Leaders.”

To achieve this vision, the council has a properties master plan.  This plan is modified from time to time based on need and situational events.

In developing the plan, the following are key principles that drive decisions:

  • Exemplary – first-class facilities, maintained to meet today’s standards;
  • Program Impact – delivering high quality programs associated with quality facilities – basically driving towards achieving the goals of the Camping Vision Statement;
  • Impact – maximizing the use and access based on location to our camps by as many Scouts as possible;
  • Efficiency – being a good steward of resources and eliminating redundancy; and
  • Sustainable – a long-term solution for ongoing operating and maintenance costs and the long-term maintenance of facilities.

Plans

The current plan includes the development of new camps including the new Tellepsen Scout Camp at Bovay Scout Ranch (near Navasota, Texas) that opened in 2015, the new Camp Strake (near Evergreen, Texas) planned to open in summer 2019 and a new Janis and George Fleming Cub World at Bovay Scout Ranch (near Navasota, Texas), which will open in a few years.  It also comprises making improvements to Camp Brosig (near Sealy, Texas) and McNair Cub Adventure Camp at Bovay Scout Ranch (near Navasota, Texas).

Camp Strake is currently under construction with a schedule for opening in summer 2019 for Boy Scout summer resident camp.  Please view the Camp Strake Video for additional information about the exciting plans for Camp Strake.  



Camp Strake Lake Rendering
*Planned lake requires permits that are in process to attain.

Please see the Frequently Asked Questions Regarding Camp Development –  March 2017 Update (“FAQ”) for information about the Camping Vision Statement, properties master plan, schedules and plans for Boy Scout summer resident camp during summer 2018. 

For additional information about Camp Strake (e.g., design plans, construction schedule, periodic updates), please reference www.samhoustonbsa.org/camp-strake.

Camp Strake Plans

Funding  

Donations are a major source of funding to develop capital improvements in the properties master plan. The council is in the midst of a major gifts campaign called Leaders of Tomorrow Campaign, which will dedicate more than $21 million for this purpose. The Leaders of Tomorrow Campaign is an initiative to unleash the potential of our programs and camp properties to best serve the needs of Scouting families in the 21st century. Please refer to the Leaders of Tomorrow Campaign for more information.

Leaders of Tomorrow Campaign 

Frequently Asked Questions

General Camp Development

What are the Sam Houston Area Council’s plans for camp development?

In 2012, the Sam Houston Area Council (“council”) approved a new Camping Vision Statement: Exemplary, Sustainable Outdoor Experiences and Creative Learning for 21st Century Youth and Their Leaders.”

Our vision is to become a leader in camping by having first-class facilities that are well maintained and to provide safe, fun and educational outdoor programs for our Scouts.

To achieve this vision, the council has a properties master plan.  This plan is modified from time to time based on need and situational events.

The plan includes developing new camps such as the Tellepsen Scout Camp at Bovay Scout Ranch (near Navasota, Texas) that opened in 2015, the new Camp Strake (near Evergreen, Texas) that is currently scheduled to open in summer 2019, and a new Janis and George Fleming Cub World at Bovay Scout Ranch (near Navasota, Texas), which will open in a few years.  It also comprises making improvements to Camp Brosig (near Sealy, Texas) and McNair Cub Adventure Camp at Bovay Scout Ranch (near Navasota, Texas).   

Are there any metrics/standards being used to measure how the c ouncil achieves the Camping Vision Statement?

Yes.  They are below.

Exemplary

  • Do the camps provide the opportunity to fulfill the aims and methods of Scouting?
  • Are facilities and programs safe and well maintained and meet today’s standards?
  • Are all program needs (Cub Scouts, Boy Scouts, and Venturing) based on the defined role of the camp being met? 
  • Are the numbers of participants utilizing the programs at an appropriate level and increasing over time?
  • Are the programs fun, creative and educational?
  • Are the camps appropriately located for their intended use?

Sustainable

  • Does the camp operate within a board approved budget?
  • Is the property environmentally sound for future generations?

21st Century Youth

  • Are programs that are conducted attractive and exciting for today’s youth?
  • Are the programs that are conducted leading youth to lifelong values, service and achievement?

Other

  • User (youth and adult) feedback will be sought as a confirmation of their experience.

Definitions

  • Well maintained – “routine maintenance and major maintenance is conducted as scheduled and needed.”
  • Environmentally sound for future generations – “the camp and its facilities are designed, managed and maintained in a manner that balances program use with sustainability.”
  • Attractive and exciting for today’s youth – “incredible facilities and fun and /or intense outdoor programs that expand the limits of what youth can do."

Camp Strake

Where is the location of the new Camp Strake that is being constructed and scheduled to open in summer 2019?
The new camp is located near the community of Evergreen, Texas, between New Waverly and Coldspring, and is about 75 miles from Houston. It is near Highway 150.  Scouts and Scouters will be able to easily get there by taking Interstate 45 or Highway 59.  It is about a thirty minute drive from the entrance of the original Camp Strake. 



 
How many acres does the new Camp Strake have?
The property includes 2,816 acres and is surrounded on three sides by the Sam Houston National Forest. 






 
Why was this site selected?
The Evergreen site was selected because it is in the heart of our target area, met our site selection criteria, which included convenient location and protection from urbanization and encroachment, and allows for expansion for programs in the future.  It is surrounded on three sides by the Sam Houston National Forest, has the Lone Star Hiking Trail going adjacent to the property, and it will be simple to get there, especially after the completion of the Grand Parkway.  


 
What will the new Camp Strake look like?

The new Camp Strake will be first-class and state-of-the-art for Scouts and their leaders and will have two distinct sections:

  • Scout camp developed for weekend and resident camp operations for Boy Scouts and Venturers;
  • Leadership Institute for advanced training programs for adult leaders and Boy Scouts/Venturers.        

 

The Scout camp for Boy Scouts and Venturers will have the following facilities:

  • 20 campsites with pavilions
  • Air conditioned dining hall with 450 person capacity
  • Event administration building
  • Large program pavilion
  • STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) center
  • Eight merit badge pavilions
  • Shooting Sports Center with rifle, shotgun and pistol ranges
  • Shooting Sports Center for archery and sporting arrows course
  • Climbing pavilion with restrooms
  • Low ropes course
  • Zip line
  • Climbing and rappelling tower
  • Bikes and all-terrain vehicle (ATV) area
  • Aquatics Center with a swimming pool and pool house
  • Aquatics Center with lake (new lake with size range of 20-30 acres being created), observation deck and canoe storage
  • Aquatics Training pavilion
  • Sport fields
  • Basketball court
  • Extensive trail system
  • Order of the Arrow ceremony site
  • Arena for 1,200 people
  • 1 Chapel for 250 people
  • 1 Chapel for 100 people
  • Modern restrooms and shower houses
  • 40 summer camp staff huts

The Leadership Institute will have the following facilities:

  • Leadership Training Center
  • 4 cabins with 8 person capacity each
  • 4 dormitories with 16 person capacity each
  • Arena for 100 people
  • Chapel for 100 people
  • 2 Training pavilions
  • Training campsite
  • Shower houses
When will the new Camp Strake open?
It is scheduled to open in the summer of 2019. That date is predicated on favorable weather conditions and no unforeseen circumstances.
Why is it taking until 2019 to open the new Camp Strake since the land was purchased back in 2013 and 2014?
There are many things that go into the development of a project of this size and it takes time to accomplish them all. Just imagine, during many of our programs throughout the year, Camp Strake will be the largest community in San Jacinto County. Compare Camp Strake to a university campus or small city. Each have features such as roads, power, water, sewer, buildings and other amenities, which require permitting from the local, state and/or federal levels some of which take considerable time. Camp Strake will be just like constructing a university campus or small city. Following are some highlights about the new Camp Strake:
  • Will have 126 structures
  • Will have 4 miles of roads
  • Will have 11.7 miles of trails
  • Over 150,000 square feet of facilities built
  • Future lake of 20-30 acres
  • Camp Strake will be the largest community in San Jacinto County during many of our weekend or weeklong programs throughout the year

Following are some of the processes and projects that have gone into and will continue to go into the development the camp:

  • Program requirements established by Camp Strake Project Definition Team
  • Master planning by architect based on program requirements
  • Land study for infrastructure including roads, power, water, sewer and lake, etc.
  • Endangered species and archeological studies conducted as required
  • Design completed by Camp Strake Design Team with architect after multiple focus group meetings involving Scouts, leaders, and special user groups such as climbing, shooting sports, etc.
  • Budget developed and approved by Board of Directors
  • Construction documents for all infrastructure features and 126 vertical structures completed by architect
  • Contractor/(s) selected by Camp Strake Construction Committee
  • Required permits obtained from local, state and federal agencies
  • Site work including creation of new lake in the size range of 20 – 30 acres
  • Infrastructure (roads, power, water and sewer) constructed
  • Vertical structures (126) constructed
Additionally, the creation of a new lake requires obtaining state and federal permits that take considerable time. After the permits are obtained and the site work for the lake is completed, it then takes many months for the lake to fill from rain water.
What will we do if we use all the space at Camp Strake?
The site for Camp Strake was selected because it contains 2,816 acres and provides ample space for expanding programs and adding campsites for weekend camping for Boy Scouts/Venturers for years to come. The Scout camp and Leadership Institute areas are only impacting about 500 acres, so we have ample space for future expansion. Also, the property is already master planned with a site for a future Cub World.  
Will Boy Scout resident camp be held at Camp Strake?
Yes. Camp Strake will be home to our summer and winter resident camp programs. Beginning in the summer 2019, Camp Strake is currently scheduled to be the site for our Boy Scout summer resident camp. Also, Boy Scout winter resident camp will move to Camp Strake from McNair Cub Adventure Camp at Bovay Scout Ranch. The current schedule for that to occur is December of 2019.



 
What types of programs will be offered at Boy Scout summer resident camps at Camp Strake?
The Boy Scout summer resident camp programs at Camp Strake – both during the summer and winter – will be the opportunity to show the full range of what Camp Strake has to offer. Current plans for these programs include:
  • A fully-trained staff engaged to deliver the best possible program experience
  • Exceptional food service in a new, state-of-the-art and air conditioned dining hall
  • Unique staffed program experiences in Challenging Outdoor Personal Experience (COPE), aquatics (lakefront and pool-based), shooting sports, climbing, STEM and ecology, and Scouting skills
  • Exciting backcountry opportunities in hiking, biking, and ATV programs
  • Impressive camp-wide events, including campfire programs at a spirit-filled 1,200 person arena
  • Comfortable camping facilities that will include pavilions in each campsite, modern and convenient restroom/shower facilities, and direct access to key program areas
  • Between summer and winter camps, over 75 unique merit badges will be offered, in addition to a comprehensive First Class emphasis program.
When can my troop sign up for Boy Scout summer resident camp for summer 2019?
That will not be known for certain until later in 2018. But please plan to be one of the first troops to participate in the first Boy Scout summer resident camps at Camp Strake! We anticipate that when registration opens for summer 2019, campsites and spots will go fast.
What programs will Camp Strake offer for weekend camping for Boy Scouts and Venturers?
Camp Strake will offer a full range of program opportunities for unit-led outdoor experiences. During a weekend, a troop or crew will have the opportunity to utilize the aquatics programs at the new lake and pool, experience a state-of-the-art shooting sports program, seek adventure in climbing and COPE activities, or explore the vast network of trails, including the Lone Star Hiking Trail in the Sam Houston National Forest, through hiking and backpacking programs.



 
What types of programs will be offered at the Leadership Institute at Camp Strake?
The Leadership Institute at Camp Strake will serve as the council’s home for our pinnacle training opportunities for youth and adults – Wood Badge and National Youth Leadership Training (NYLT). It will also serve as a facility to accommodate basic and supplemental training, as well as a venue for planning meetings and retreats for Scouting groups.







 
Can I go see the new Camp Strake site now?
No, not at this time. While we are very anxious for everyone to see the new Camp Strake, it is an active construction site and therefore it is not safe for visitors. Additionally, because of contractual agreements with our contractors doing the work there, we are required to restrict visitor access. In the meantime, we will provide updates including photographs of the work in progress at www.samhoustonbsa.org/camp-strake.

Camp Strake Progress


 
Will there be a new Cub World at Camp Strake?
Not at this time. However, there will be a new Cub World named the Janis and George Fleming Cub World developed at the Bovay Scout Ranch instead of Camp Strake. It is planned to be constructed in a few years.




 
Why is the Janis and George Fleming Cub World going to be at Bovay Scout Ranch instead of Camp Strake?
Primarily, there are two reasons. First, we already have facilities for Cub Scouts at Bovay Scout Ranch, and there is ample room for expansion utilizing the existing resources for our Cub camping program. Second, is more cost effective. We already have some infrastructure in place at Bovay Scout Ranch to support incorporating a new Cub World. At the new Camp Strake, the infrastructure, including roads, sewer, water, etc., would have to be constructed to support a Cub World there.



 
When will the new Janis and George Fleming Cub World at Bovay Scout Ranch constructed?
No schedule has been developed at this time. However, it is an important project and plans are being developed to construct the first phase as soon as all the necessary funding is secured. The first phase of development includes six campsites, each with a pavilion, three restrooms/showers and two program elements. Additional phases will be added as funding is secured.




 
Will there ever be a Cub World at Camp Strake?
There could be. Camp Strake has the space and is master planned for a Cub World. The necessary demand for another Cub World and the funding to develop it will determine that timing.






 
Where can I get additional information about Camp Strake and keep up with its construction?
Information about Camp Strake is on the council’s website. Periodic updates on the progress of construction will be posted there. Please reference www.samhoustonbsa.org/camp-strake.

Camp Strake Progress

Summer Camp 2018

What are the council’s plans for Boy Scout summer resident camp in summer 2018 with the new Camp Strake not scheduled to open until summer 2019?
Our plans are not to conduct Boy Scout summer resident camp in 2018 at one of our camp properties and instead assist our Boy Scout troops to find a suitable summer resident camp at another council’s camp to meet their needs.

There are many other local council camps in the Texas region. We have partnered with the Capitol Area Council headquartered in Austin, Texas for troops to consider their Boy Scout summer camp program at Lost Pines Scout Reservation, located in Bastrop, Texas.

The Capitol Area Council has expanded their Lost Pines Boy Scout Summer Camp season in 2018 to accommodate our troops.

Also, we will continue to provide campership assistance for our Scouts in need to participate in a Boy Scout summer resident camp program if they attend the Lost Pines Boy Scout Summer Camp in 2018.
How would my troop register for Lost Pines Boy Scout Summer Camp at the Lost Pines Scout Reservation for summer 2018, and how would my Scout/s in need of campership assistance apply for it?
The link to the Capitol Area Council’s website page for Lost Pines Boy Scout Summer Camp is www.bsacac.org/activities/for_boy_scouts/summercamp. Once they open their registration for summer resident camp 2018, just register for a session with them just as you would any other camp.

The application for your Scout/(s) that need campership assistance will be conducted through the Sam Houston Area Council. Additional information regarding that application process will be made available after the 2017 summer resident camp season.

For all Scouts that we provide a campership to attend Lost Pines Boy Scout Camp in summer 2018, we will pay the Capitol Area Council directly on behalf of your troop.
Can my Scouts who need campership assistance apply for a campership if my troop is attending summer resident camp at any other camp other than Lost Pines Boy Scout Summer Camp?
No. We are only providing campership assistance for our Scouts whose troops are attending summer resident camp in 2018 at Lost Pines Boy Scout Summer Camp.
Why is that?
While we will promote all local councils’ camps in the Texas region for your troop to consider attending in summer 2018, we decided to pair up with a camp close to Houston that had the ability to increase capacity at its camp for this one year and for simplicity in processing campership assistance that we will continue to provide to our Scouts in need.

The Capitol Area Council’s Lost Pines Scout Reservation is located outside of Bastrop, which is approximately 125 miles and about a two-hour drive from Houston.
Why not conduct Boy Scout summer resident camp at Bovay Scout Ranch utilizing Tellepsen Scout Camp in summer 2018 like we have been doing for Boy Scout Winter Camp?

That was considered but decided not to for reasons such as:

  • Cub Scout Resident Camp is conducted in June and July at the McNair Cub Adventure Camp at Bovay Scout Ranch and this would conflict with scheduling a Boy Scout resident camp at Bovay Scout Ranch because each program would need to use the dining hall at the same time.
  • Because of the scheduling conflict and use of the dining hall, a Boy Scout summer resident camp program could not be scheduled until late July, which historically has had the lowest demand for summer camp sessions.   
  • Rather than planning to conduct one or two week-long sessions of Boy Scout resident camp at Bovay Scout Ranch, utilizing Tellepsen Scout Camp that would have to be held in late July that we anticipate the demand would be low, we determined it would be more helpful and effective to find a suitable summer resident camp at another council’s camp to meet their needs.
  • Lack of ability to conduct the standard summer aquatic programs.

Bovay Scout Ranch

Have there been any additional projects completed at Tellepsen Scout Camp at Bovay Scout Ranch since it opened in 2015?

Yes.  The following additional projects were completed in 2016: 

  • Climbing tower lighting
  • Pavilion at climbing tower
  • Canoe launch bulkhead on lake
  • Canoe storage building
  • Canoe area pavilion
  • Campfire arena
What are the plans for McNair Cub Adventure Camp at Bovay Scout Ranch?

Following are the planned projects by priority:

  • First Group of Projects
    • Roadway renovations
    • Restroom (Field Sports area)
    • Refurbish and repair existing buildings
  • Second Group of Projects
    • Parking lot expansion
    • Electrical extension into campsites
    • Storage facility at lake front
    • Pool renovation
    • Storage/Check-out building for the BMX Track
    • Nature Building Renovation (concrete floor)
  • Third Group of Projects
    • Storage facility at lake front
    • Expand pool features
When will these projects at McNair Cub Adventure Camp at Bovay Scout Ranch be completed?
Projects will be completed as soon as the needed funds are raised and collected through the Leaders of Tomorrow Campaign.

 

Camp Brosig

What are the plans for Camp Brosig?

The plans for Camp Brosig are to continue to make improvements to it as soon as the needed funds are raised and collected through the Leaders of Tomorrow Campaign.

Following are the planned projects:

  • Road repairs
  • Camp entrance
  • 2 shower/restroom facilities
  • BB gun range (Cub Scouts)
  • Archery range (Cub Scouts)
  • 2 program pavilions
  • Campsite pavilions (carport style)

General

Our camps have not always been well maintained. How will the council maintain our new camps and the improvements that are being made now?
For the first time in our council’s history, we have an endowment with sufficient resources to maintain Camp Strake into the future. We are in the process of building an endowment for Bovay Scout Ranch that in time may have sufficient resources to maintain it over time, as well.

The resources of the council are limited. We are thoughtful and take seriously our charge to use those resources wisely to provide Scouting programs to an increasing number of youth. That is our mission. It is important that we eliminate redundancies in properties and have efficient and sustainable camp operations.

The way we will maintain our camps requires us to not have more camp properties than we need based on usage, demand, and sustainability. Also, we desire and are striving to an endowment for the camps that we do need based on usage and demand.
How many camp properties and acres of land will the council own and operate after Camp Strake is completed?

Our council will own and operate three camp properties with a combined total of 4,395 acres. 

  • Bovay Scout Ranch / 1,245 contiguous acres and an additional separate 242 acres.  It includes:  
    • McNair Cub Scout Adventure Camp
    • Future Janis and George Fleming Cub World
    • Tellepsen Scout Camp
  • Camp Brosig / 92 acres
  • Camp Strake / 2,816 acres. It will include:
    • Scout Camp (to be named)
    • Leadership Institute (to be named)

 

Questions

For additional questions, contact Thomas.Franklin@scouting.org.