Pinewood Derby Champ Camp 

Posted by Darlene Scheffler Friday, December 15, 2017 10:34:00 AM

January 6 and January 13, 2018

Make a pit stop at your Scout Shop to help you get ready for the raceway! Test-race your car… Try out the tools!Pinewood Derby® Champ Camp delivers winning know-how! Whether it’s your first Pinewood Derby® or your fifteenth, there’s plenty to learn at an event like this.

  • Learn the tricks that can shave seconds off your race time
  • Discover precision tools that can streamline your build
  • Find out your car’s exact weight and test it on a track
  • Ask the questions that make the difference when you get back home

Hosted by the local Scout Shops, Champ Camp is the go-to workshop for know-how on everything pinewood derby. 

  • Houston Scout Shop on January 13, 2018 (all month long, come in to weigh your car and practice on our test track)
  • Stafford Scout Shop on January 6, 2018
  • Strake Scout Shop on January 13, 2018
  • Clear Lake Scout Shop on January 13, 2018
  • 1960 Scout Shop on January 6, 2018

 

Houston Area Scout Shops

2225 North Loop West, Suite A
Houston, TX 77008
Marcus Jackson, manager
houstonscoutshop@scouting.org
(713) 865-5190
google map

Hours
Mon.-Fri.: 9 AM - 6 PM
Sat.: 10 AM - 5 PM
Closed Sunday

September only!
Saturday 9 AM - 6 PM

12300 Parc Crest Drive, Suite 130
Stafford, TX 77477
Inside the United Way building
John Pyle, manager
staffordscoutshop@scouting.org
(281) 207-2340
google map

Hours
Mon.-Fri.: 10 AM - 6 PM
Sat.: 10 AM - 3 PM
Closed Sunday

Strake Scout Shop
1188-B West Dallas St
Conroe, TX  77301
Diana Madrigal, manager
campstrakescoutshop@scouting.org
1-800-864-1568
google map


Hours
Mon. - Sat. : 10 AM - 6 PM
Closed Sunday 

6512 FM 1960 West (at Champion Dr)
Houston, TX 77069
Allen Adams, manager
champions1960scoutshop@scouting.org
(281) 444-1152
google map

Hours
Mon.-Fri.: 10 AM - 7 PM
Sat.: 10 AM - 5 PM
Closed Sunday

1300 Bay Area Blvd., Suite #101
Inside the United Way Bldg A
Houston, TX 77058
Kim Faught, manager
clearlakescoutshop@scouting.org
(281) 282-6067
google map

Hours
Mon.-Wed.: 10 AM - 6 PM
Thurs.: 10 AM - 7 PM
Fri.: 10 AM - 5 PM
Sat.: 10 AM - 3 PM
Closed Sunday

   The Houston Scout Shop is owned and operated by the Boy Scouts of America.

 

 

 

 

Scoutbook Training and Instructions 

Posted by Darlene Scheffler Thursday, December 14, 2017 5:17:00 AM

SHAC to provide Scoutbook

Beginning in 2018, Sam Houston Area Council will pay for Scoutbook for all volunteer-run packs and troop. 

Update 12/14/17: Scoutbook is a web-based application designed for computers or mobile devices. It delivers a suite of easy-to-use web-based tools that are helpful to Scouts, parents and unit leaders, and enables units to communicate, update records, track advancement, and manage activities better. Because of the many potential benefits that are available in this tool, the Sam Houston Area Council has agreed to purchase Scoutbook for all volunteer-led Cub Scout packs and Boy Scout troops in 2018.

Unit leaders will receive a letter in the mail providing the access code to enter into Scoutbook and instructions. Once this code is entered, your Cub Scout pack will have access to all of the benefits of Scoutbook. While Scoutbook is not required to be used in reporting Cub Scout advancements, it is highly encouraged as it can be synced to Internet Advancement (IA) and, once done, eliminates the need to entering Cub Scout records twice (once in a tracking program and once in IA).

Scoutbook Training 

February 10, 2018

On February 10, the first council-wide opportunity to learn Scoutbook will be conducted at the Cockrell Scout Center from 8:00 – noon for basic users, and from 1:00 – 2:00 for those interested in Merit Badge Counselor related features (intended for Boy Scout users). The training will begin with a general session, followed by breakouts specializing in the following user areas:

  1. Parental use of Scoutbook to help track the advancement of their scouts.
  2. Unit Leader use of Scoutbook to accomplish the following:
  • a. Approve advancement requirement completions
  • b. Assign Merit Badge Counselors to Scouts (Boy Scouts only)
  • c. Manage unit events calendar
  • d. Manage synchronization of member data with ScoutNET
  • e. Track adult leader training status
  • f. Manage the unit organization (dens, patrols)
  • g. Track attendance at unit activities
  • h. Develop customized unit reports

3. Advancement Chair use of Scoutbook for advancement tracking and reporting includes:

  • a. Synchronization with ScoutNET
  • b. Developing advancement reports
  • c. Tracking Scout progress on advancement

Following a lunch break (bring your own), the training will continue with an orientation on how to use the​ Merit Badge Counselor functions in Scoutbook (for Boy Scout troops). This training is free and open to any registered adults in the council and parents of Scouts. Please register at the link below for the appropriate breakout session so we can plan workspaces accordingly. We look forward to seeing you in February.

Scoutbook Training

David Van Kleeck

Advancement and Recognition Committee Chair

Sam Houston Area Council


Scoutnet to Sync with Internet Advancement

Attention Scoutbook users,

In the coming weeks, unit leaders who use Scoutbook should look for an email regarding syncing Scoutbook and Internet Advancement. Troops in the Sam Houston Area Council have already started receiving them and all Scoutbook units should receive an email by the end of October. After following a few simple steps, units will no longer need to use Internet Advancement and can just use Scoutbook!  

Learn More     Troop Update          Pack Update         What is Scoutbook?

Advancement Sync for Troops

Source: www.scoutbook.com/mobile/blog/77/advancement-sync/

Scoutbook is currently rolling out the Scoutbook Advancement Record Sync with ScoutNet to troops.  When your troop is approved by the system to activate the sync, the Scoutbook Unit Admins for your unit will be notified and given instructions.  It will be a few weeks before all troops are turned on.

NOTE: The sync must be activated for your troop by a currently registered Key 3 member who is also set up in Scoutbook as a unit administrator.  Often the key 3 member is not familiar with Scoutbook so it may be advisable for another Scoutbook unit admin to work closely with the Key 3 member who is going through the steps to activate the sync for your troop.  Once the troop is activated in the sync, any unit administrator can conduct Scoutbook administrative tasks going forward.

Quality assurance testing is still being conducted for the pack rollout.  It will be a few weeks before we begin rollout with the packs.

Here are some things you can do to prepare your unit to be ready for the sync:

  1. Make sure all Scouts on the roster are registered in the unit and have their current BSA Member ID in their profile. A unit key 3 member (unit leader, chartered organization representative or unit committee chair) can go to Member Manager at http://my.scouting.org and download a unit roster which has the member ID and registered name for each Scout. NOTE: For the membership ID to be accepted by Scoutbook, the Scout's first name or last name must be exactly as it appears in the first name or last name field in your council's system. If you have problems, please contact your council registrar and ask them which name is in which field. 
  2. Make sure there are no duplicate Scouts on your roster in Scoutbook.
  3. The person who will be setting your unit up for the sync must be a unit key 3 member (unit leader, chartered organization representative or unit committee chair) and a Scoutbook unit admin. They will need to verify their My.ScoutingTools login credentials so they should check that they can log in at http://my.scouting.org and they are listed as a key 3 member.
  4. Make sure there are at least 3 Scoutbook unit admins in your unit, and that they have logged into Scoutbook at least once.

A user guide on activating the sync is here:  http://bit.ly/2ynvKJ7  If you have any questions about the sync, send an email to: scoutbooksync@gmail.com 

Guide to the Sync            Scoutbook User Guide

Questions

Do you have a question or comment? The best place to post it is on the Scoutbook Forums.  We have volunteers monitoring the forums daily.  The Scoutbook forum can be found at this link: www.scoutbook.com/mobile/forums

Scoutbook Questions 


Advancement Sync for Packs

Scoutbook is currently conducting quality assurance testing for the Scoutbook Advancement Record Sync with ScoutNet to packs.  When your pack is approved by the system to activate the sync, the Scoutbook Unit Admins for your unit will be notified and given instructions.  It will be a few weeks before all packs receive notification.

Packs Should Prepare

Scoutbook is a few weeks away from rolling out packs; however, please prepare now. 

  1. Make sure all Scouts on the roster are registered in the unit and have their current BSA Member ID in their profile. A unit key 3 member (unit leader, chartered organization representative or unit committee chair) can go to Member Manager at http://my.scouting.org and download a unit roster which has the member ID and registered name for each Scout. NOTE: For the membership ID to be accepted by Scoutbook, the Scout's first name or last name must be exactly as it appears in the first name or last name field in your council's system. If you have problems, please contact your council registrar and ask them which name is in which field. 
  2. Make sure there are no duplicate Scouts on your roster in Scoutbook.
  3. The person who will be setting your unit up for the sync must be a unit key 3 member (unit leader, chartered organization representative or unit committee chair) and a Scoutbook unit admin. They will need to verify their My.ScoutingTools login credentials so they should check that they can log in at http://my.scouting.org and they are listed as a key 3 member.
  4. Make sure there are at least 3 Scoutbook unit admins in your unit, and that they have logged into Scoutbook at least once.

What is Scoutbook

What is Scoutbook?

Scoutbook is a web application designed for mobile devices. Scoutbook delivers a suite of easy-to-use Web-based tools that are helpful to Scouts, parents and unit leaders. It enables units to better communicate, update records, track advancement and manage activities.

Which Scouting programs does Scoutbook support?

Scoutbook currently is designed for Cub Scout, Boy Scout. and Venturing units.

Who can register as a Scoutbook user?

Although any adult leader or Scout can register, Scoutbook is designed specifically for registered unit leaders, registered Scouts, and parents or guardians of registered Scouts.

How do I subscribe?

Visit Scoutbook.com to register; however, please wait for further instructions before subscribing.

Is training available?

Yes. Training resources are available once you are logged in at Scoutbook.com, and additional training is in development.

Who can see my information?

Scoutbook is a secure platform that provides a safe way for parents, Scouts, and leaders to record, track, and manage their Scouting experience. Personally identifiable information will be kept secure. Unit leaders can see Scout advancement information as well as training data on other unit volunteers.

Can I port my third-party unit-management vendor data to Scoutbook?

There will be no need to port data from other third-party vendors because Scoutbook will link to all unit membership data.

Can I still use other third-party unit-management vendors once Scoutbook launches?

Although Scoutbook will be made available to all units, they may continue to choose other third-party applications. However, Scoutbook will be the only unit-management system fully integrated with the BSA database.

How do Scoutbook and Commissioner Tools fit into My.Scouting and Commissioner Tools?

Scoutbook is a unit-management web application that will become the one-stop shop for Scouts, parents, and unit leaders to record and manage their Scouting experience. This tool will provide unit members a way to track advancements, unit activities, and unit communications.

Commissioner Tools is a module within My.Scouting Tools, which allows volunteers and employees to evaluate unit health and identify units in need of assistance. Commissioners will continue to use Commissioner Tools to monitor the health of their units, but should expect the data to become more robust as more Scouts and unit leaders engage with Scoutbook.

Questions

Where do I go for answers to technical questions related to Scoutbook?

More information is available on the Scoutbook.com forums.

 

 

 

Questions

Where do I go for answers to technical questions related to Scoutbook?

More information is available on the Scoutbook.com forums.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Report Service Hours and Advancements 

Posted by Darlene Scheffler Monday, December 4, 2017 2:18:00 PM

Service Hours

Report by December 31, 2017

All Scouting groups are encouraged to participate in service projects. A service project is a special Good Turn that puts Scout spirit into action. Some Good Turns are big—saving a life, helping out after floods or other disasters, recycling community trash, working on conservation projects. But Good Turns are often small, thoughtful acts—helping a child cross a busy street, going to the store for an elderly neighbor, cutting back brush that is blocking a sign, doing something special for a brother or sister, or welcoming a new student to your school. Anyone can get involved in a Good Turn.

Did you know that your unit can earn points towards the Journey to Excellence program just for logging your units community service hours online? That’s right your unit can earn up to 200 extra points if you log your service hours online. All types of service projects can be entered into this system including the Good Turn for America projects such as the shelter drive, food drive, and blood drive. Units may also enter their service hours for community projects that they took on as a unit. Please log all service hours. Journey to Excellence is the BSA's council performance recognition program designed to encourage and reward success and measure the performance of our units, districts, and councils. It is meant to encourage excellence in providing a quality program at all levels of the BSA.

All service hours for should be logged no later than December 31st.

What hours should be logged?

  • Any service hours performed by your unit for individuals or organizations in the community
  • Service hours performed by your unit to support your chartered organization
  • Scouting for Food hours
  • Eagle Scout project hours

Resources

Journey to Excellence

"Scouting's Journey to Excellence" is the BSA's council performance recognition program designed to encourage and reward success and measure the performance of our units, districts, and councils. It is meant to encourage excellence in providing a quality program at all levels of the BSA. 

Journey to Excellence Website

2017 Scorecards

Internet Advancements

Submit by December 31, 2017

Internet advancement is a tool for units to report youth advancements, awards, and merit badges. Before beginning internet advancement, collect all member information, including advancement records, award records, and merit badge applications with the appropriate signatures. To complete internet advancement, you must be connected to a printer to print the final report.

Units should make sure all advancements are submitted by December 31st, so proper Journey to Excellence (JTE) advancement statistics will be accurate for your unit and district.

Learn More              Submit Internet Advancements

Adams Eagle Scout Project of the Year Award 

Posted by Darlene Scheffler Monday, December 4, 2017 12:16:00 PM

Due January 15, 2018

The Glenn A. and Melinda W. Adams National Eagle Scout Service Project of the Year Award program of the National Council is designed to recognize the valuable service of an exceptional nature by an Eagle Scout to a religious institution, a school, community, or other entity. The award recognizes the Scout for his Eagle Scout leadership service project, which is part of the requirements for earning the Eagle Scout Award.

The council winner and up to five finalists are recognized at the annual New Eagle Scout Reception. Each finalist will receive a certificate and the council award recipient will receive an award pin for their uniform. 

All Eagle Scouts with Board of Review dates in 2017, may now apply. Parents, mentors, or leaders of the Eagle Scout can complete the form on behalf of the Eagle Scout. The deadline to submit a nomination is January 15, 2018.

Adams Award Nomination Form


Sam Houston Area Council Winner and Finalists: Up to five finalists and one council winner will be recognized at the annual New Eagle Scout Reception. Every finalist will receive a certificate, and the council award winner will receive a bronze award device for their uniform.

Regional Winner: Council winners will compete within the Southern Region for recognition as finalists for the national award. One Eagle Scout from the Southern Region will receive a certificate, a gold award pin, and a $500 award to further his education or help pay to attend a Scouting activity.

National Winner: The winners from each region will compete with the winning Scout recognized at the national meeting with a certificate, silver award pint and a $2,500 award to further his education or help pay to attend a Scouting activity.


Selection Criteria:

  • Project planning required
  • Effort required to develop the project
  • Extent and character of the leadership provided by the Scout
  • Extent of achievement of the planned result, including changes required to complete the project
  • The project’s impact on the beneficiary and/or on the community at large
  • Originality and scope of the project
  • Time and materials contributed
  • Level of skill employed to complete the project

Requirements: A copy of the Eagle Scout Project Workbook (.pdf) and three photos (.jpg) must be attached to the nomination form. Please submit three photos that best show the impact of the project. For example:

  • Before and after photos (for building projects)
  • Group photo of the team that worked on the service project
  • Photos of Scouts working on the project

Maximum attachment size is 25MB. Contact us, if you don't know how to reduce the size of your attachments. You will still need to fill out the nomination form online, but will need to mail the attachments.


Contact Information

The nomination will not be complete until these items are received. Electronic format is preferred but paper copies may be mailed:

Adams Eagle Scout Service Project Award
Eagle Scout Association – SHAC
Attn: Travis Briner
PO Box 924528
Houston, TX 77292

 

 

 

 

 

Powder Horn 

Posted by Darlene Scheffler Saturday, December 2, 2017 4:22:00 PM

Powder Horn is an action-packed, hands-on, six-day course which helps Scouts and Scouters learn how to implement high adventure activities into their troop, crew or ship.

Do you have young adults in Venturing who are looking to breathe underwater because they have already learned how to filter it?  What about Boy Scouts who are ready to maximize their shooting skills?  Or Sea Scouts wanting to sail in a different country?  Would you like to expose your troop, crew or ship to rock climbing, Dutch oven cooking, geocaching, canoeing, kayaking, sailing, paddle boarding, firefighting, search and rescue, trekking in a different countries, mountain biking, fly fishing, canoeing, wilderness first aid, astronomy, shooting sport (e.g., rifle, shotgun, handgun, archery), equestrian, 1860 baseball, wilderness survival, NYLT, Sea Scouts, the Kodiak Challenge, the Hornaday award, Messenger of Peace, living history, Leave No Trace, vendors, Jamboree, event planning, tying flies, scuba diving, and more?

The course spans two, three-day weekends:

Powder Horn is offered once every year, so do not miss this chance to attend.  Set your sights on a course that maximizes Scouting skills while bringing adrenaline, new activity ideas and leadership to your unit.  Powder Horn is designed to introduce and expose Venturing, Sea Scout and Boy Scout adult and youth leaders to the activities, training and resources necessary to manage a successful outdoor or high adventure unit-level program.  It is based on the eight core requirements and eighteen electives found in the Venturing Ranger program.  It is intended to help leaders get out of the box in finding and using resources, and in the way they lead their unit-level outdoor and high adventure programs.

Powder Horn trainers do not train you to be an expert, or even to be self-sufficient in any aspect of outdoor skills.  Unit leaders will still need to find knowledgeable, trained, and certified individuals to help provide a safe and exciting outdoor high adventure program.

Registration

Adult leaders from all Scouting programs and young adults age 14 and older are eligible to attend; there are no restrictions on attending the course a second time. The course has a limited capacity and fills up early, so don’t wait to register!  The cost is $275 per person.  Powder Horn is offered only once every year, so do not miss this chance to attend.

Register for Powder Horn

Powder Horn Vest and Belt Buckle

You took your passion for adventure to attend Powder Horn training, now purchase a special keepsake that will preserve your amazing experience! Vests are forest green 100% soft polyester fleece with non-pill finish surface and have the Powder Horn logo embroidered on the left, front side of the jacket. The vest comes complete with twill-taped neck, reverse coil zipper, chin guard, bungee cord zipper pulls, tricot-lined armholes, front zippered pockets and open hem with drawcord and toggles for adjustability. Warm, lightweight, and comfortable. Highly breathable.  Logos will not have specific course dates. The base price is $30.00; there is an extra charge for sizes 2X and above. 

With pride, add to your collection of Boy Scout belt buckles with this special Powder Horn belt buckle. Rugged-looking pewter tone belt buckle showcases a die-struck Powder Horn logo in the center surrounded by the words "Powder Horn Course" and "Boy Scouts of America." Each buckle comes individually boxed. Items will not be mailed; they may be picked up at the Cockrell Scout Center.  

Order Vests and Belt Buckles

Powder Horn is designed to:

  1. Expose participants to high adventure activities for older youth in troops, crews, ships and teams.
  2. Provide an introduction to the resources and consultants available to successfully lead Scouting units through a program of high adventure.
  3. Help adult and young adult leaders feel comfortable offering challenging outdoor activities while balancing fun with safety, health, and responsibility.

Participant Qualifications

  • Be a registered adult or a registered Boy Scout, Varsity Scout, Venturing Scout or Sea Scout who is at least 14 years old. For young adults between the ages of 14 and 17, the course director requests that the applicant, their parent, and a unit leader have a conversation around maturity, expectations, and the Powder Horn experience.
  • Youth must have completed the required leadership training for the unit in which they are registered (Introduction to Leadership Skills or National Youth Leadership Training).
  • Submit a copy of BSA Annual Health and Medical Record (Part A, B, C). 
  • Adults must be trained for their position
  • Complete the following online trainings at My.Scouting.org
    • Youth Protection Training (YPT)
    • Venturing Youth Protection Training (YPT)
    • Hazardous Weather
    • Safety Afloat
    • Safe Swim Defense
    • Climb on Safely

Frequently Asked Questions About Powder Horn

Why Powder Horn?

Many Scouting leaders face the dilemma of having a strong desire to provide challenging and fun outdoor programs to meet the needs of their older youth members, but lack the knowledge and/or resources to do so. Powder Horn responds to the quandary with an exciting new training opportunity that exposes Venturing, Varsity Scout, Boy Scout leaders, and youth leaders ages 14 and up to a wide range of outdoor/high adventure activities. More importantly, Powder Horn provides its participants with valuable resource and contacts to assist them in delivering the promise of Scouting’s high adventure to youth.

Testimonial 1               Testimonial 2

What is the approach for this training?

Experts or "consultants" teach the courses and introduce participants to a variety of high adventure activities in our area. Participants do not become experts in an activity; participants will learn how to help their unit’s youth leaders find and recruit experts in activities that the Scouts may enjoy.

Participants will experience activities such as climbing or shooting sports or shoot a skeet course, and will learn where to go to find those who can teach these skills to Boy Scouts and Venturers. Under no circumstances is any Powder Horn participant required to participate in an activity they are uncomfortable with.  Participants may choose to just observe and learn - "Challenge by Choice."

What activities are presented at Powder Horn?

Participants will experience at least ten activities from the following list:

Astronomy, ATV, aquatics, backpacking, camping, canoeing, cave exploring, challenge events (COPE), climbing/rappelling, conservation, cycling - road/mountain, ecology, emergency preparedness, equestrian, expedition planning, extreme sports, fishing, first aid, geocaching, historical reenactment / living history, hunting, kayaking, Leave No Trace (LNT), lifesaving, motor boating, mountain biking, orienteering, outdoor living history, personal watercraft, plants and wildlife, sailing, sailboarding, search and rescue, SCUBA, shooting sports, snorkeling, space exploration, wilderness first aid, wilderness survival, and winter sports.
What are the learning objectives?

1. Learn what resources are available to support a high adventure program.
2. Learn where to find the resources.
3. Learn how to use the resources.
4. Learn how to safely do a high adventure program.
5. Learn what is involved with different high adventure disciplines.

What is the history of Powder Horn?

In 1983, Louise, a 37-year-old very shy woman read in Boys' Life about an Outdoor Exploring High Adventure training in Lubbock, Texas. It was in the spring and if you have ever been in the Texas Panhandle in the spring you know that it can be hot, sunny, rainy, windy, tornado or snowing.  Louise packed her camping gear (bits and pieces borrowed from her two Scout sons along with a new tent) into her car and headed for Lubbock (two hours away).  She knew only what she had learned at Wood Badge in 1978 about “high adventure” in the outdoors but had never experienced real high adventure in person.

The course material said it would cover climbing and rappelling, small boat sailing, camping, backpacking, snow skiing, canoe and much more.  After getting lost on the loop around Lubbock, she finally arrived at the “camp” (a park).  About eight people showed up from around the country. (They probably came to see what snow skiing in Lubbock was like).

Louise promptly lost her car keys.  Thinking she had locked them in the trunk of the car, a state trooper tried to pick the lock.  He succeeded in screwing up the electronic system and finally getting the trunk open.  About that time, Louise found her keys in her pocket!

After a supper (of sorts) the group pitched their tents and settled in for the night.  It rained and rained and rained and the wind blew, lightning struck and Louise got wet and cold.  The next day was somewhat better.  Small boat sailing, canoe and yes snow skiing (cross country skiing on the grass).  A wall and ladder were used for climbing and rappelling.  Backpacking and other outdoor skills were covered.  Then everyone loaded up and went for showers at a local high school (oops!! Someone forgot to turn on the hot water heater). The showers felt really good even if they were so cold!!  The crew then moved to a Scout camp (Camp Haynes) where they pitched their tents at 2:00 A.M.  Cold, hungry and tired Louise settled in for the night.  Like a good Scout, Louise had ten essentials for survival including tea bags and a little camp stove and water.  Louise began to shake—shake like she had never shaken before.  She had read about hypothermia and was afraid that was what she had because of the cold showers and long day.  She knew that she had to get warm, but Louise could not light the fire that could save her life because she was shaking too much.  Desperate, she crawled out of her tent and went to the first tent.  Wayne, a man in his 70’s was sound asleep. Louise woke him and told him her problem.  He soon realized the danger and made her some tea.  Louise was soon sound asleep. Wayne knew that he had saved her life and felt very good as he dozed off.  The short night was soon over.  Wayne and Louise never forgot that night.

The next day was better.  250 foot cliffs and slow rappels made the day great.  Soon the shy Louise was enjoying herself, but was unaware of what she was learning would help hundreds and possibly thousands of youth in Exploring and now Venturing.

Shy Louise went to one small outdoor training event in Lubbock, Texas 18 years ago.  That event changed her life and the life of her husband and their 2 sons.  It will impact the lives of their 7 grandchildren.  She went home and started a high adventure Explorer post.  The post had as many as 250 youth.  They went SCUBA diving, snow skiing, water skiing, climbing & rappelling, camping, and much more.  The post was in Boys' Life three times and participated in a training video.  Louise was the chairperson of the outdoor cluster of the national Exploring committee.  She is a dive master, Red Cross instructor, EMT, boat captain, NRA instructor in rifle, shotgun, pistol and black powder and COPE director.  She will be the first female Course Director in her council for Wood Badge.

You should realize what a really small training program in Lubbock Texas has done for Louise.  It changed her life.  Much like the new Powder Horn course can change the life of the Venturing crew advisor.  It gives that advisor the opportunity to “taste” high adventure.  It gives them the confidence they need to find experts and resources to help them provide experiences for their youth.  

Incidentally, Louise is Donna Louise Cunningham, one of the authors of the Ranger Guidebook and the first course director for Powder Horn.  She currently serves on the Venturing Outdoor Committee. 

The first adult training done to see if there was a possibility to do Explorer adult outdoor training was done in Amarillo, Texas in September 1997. Participants came from Amarillo, Wichita Falls, Texas, Oklahoma and Wisconsin.  It was such a success that the outdoor committee decided to pursue the syllabus.  Larry and Donna Cunningham were given the responsibility of developing the syllabus.  Then, in March of 1998, Exploring was moved to Learning for Life. Venturing was born.  We were hard pressed to develop literature to have ready by August 1, 1998 when Venturing was officially announced at the All Hands Conference in Nashville.  

The first national Powder Horn course was conducted in September 1999, 50 people attended the first course in the Philmont backcountry at Hunting Lodge.  Cimarroncito was used as a program area,  as well as Webster Parks, and Aspen Springs for the overnights. 

Contacts

Karen Taylor
Powder Horn Course Director
(281) 391-1031
 karentaylor@atty@gmail.com

 

Jeanne Gebo
Powder Horn Registration
 713-756-3305
jeanne.gebo@scouting.org

 

Benno Dunn
Council Training Chair
 (281) 413-9912
 bennodunn@yahoo.com

 

Nathan Doherty
Program Chair and Training Chair Staff Advisor
 (713) 756-3308
nathan.doherty@scouting.org

 

 

Friends of Scouting 

Posted by Darlene Scheffler Sunday, November 19, 2017 1:10:00 PM

Unit Friends of Scouting (FOS) Ambassador Training

Tuesday, December 5, 2017    |    7:00 - 8:30 pm

Each unit is asked to conduct a Friends of Scouting campaign to explain the services of the Sam Houston Area Council to parents and leaders and offer them the opportunity to financially support the council's annual operation.  

This training session is for district Family Friends of Scouting chairs as well as unit ambassadors. The role of the unit ambassador is to ensure unit participation and fundraising goals are set and achieved.

RSVP

Has your unit scheduled a Friends of Scouting presentation?

Calling all unit leaders to schedule a date and time for your Friends of Scouting presentation. 

Each unit is requested to hold a FOS presentation at your unit’s biggest gathering (typically the blue and gold banquet or a troop court of honor) during the months of February through May. The presentation, which takes approximately seven minutes to conduct, informs parents and leaders of all council services, its financial needs and extends an opportunity to help fulfill the need. 

Schedule a Presentation

Friends of Scouting is an opportunity for families, friends, alumni, businesses and community organizations to support Scouting. The $33 registration fee goes directly to the national office of the Boy Scouts of America. If a Scout unit collects dues, that money stays with the unit to help pay for supplies, advancements, and other activities. None of that money helps the Sam Houston Area Council. In order to keep Scouting affordable for all youth, the council runs an annual Friends of Scouting fundraising campaign.

Friends of Scouting helps:

  • FOS CSPRecruit and train youth and leaders
  • Provide assistance to those in need
  • Keep camps and activities affordable
  • Enhance programming and facilities
  • Provide communication tools for volunteer leaders

Friends of Scouting contributions provide approximately 24 percent of the support the council receives each year. The success of Scouting depends on those who support it. Please help Scouting provide the resources necessary to make sure every youth can benefit from Scouting’s fun, exciting, adventure-filled activities that foster character, honesty, respect and life-long values.

Schedule a Presentation


 

 

Schedule a Presentation Contact  
Schedule a presentation in Aldine Pathfinder District  Jack Jones, Field Director  
Schedule a presentation in Aquila District  Stacie Collins, Senior District Executive
(713) 259-9170, Cell
stacie.collins@scouting.org
 
Schedule a presentation in Arrowmoon District  Corey Broadway, District Executive
(936) 520-4001, Cell
corey.broadway@scouting.org
 
Schedule a presentation in
Big Cypress District
 
Regina Gervin, Senior District Executive
(713) 598-7571, Cell
regina.gervin@scouting.org
 
Schedule a presentation in Brahman District  Oliver Nguyen, District Executive
(979) 204-1108, Cell
oliver.nguyen@scouting.org
 
Schedule a presentation in Brazos District  Brian McGuire, Field Director  
Schedule a presentation in Copperhead District  Brendan Cronin, Senior District Executive
(713) 598-7054, Cell
brendan.cronin@scouting.org
 
Schedule a presentation in David Crockett District  George Etier, Field Director  
Schedule a presentation in Flaming Arrow District  Candace Skinner, District Executive
(713) 598-4954, Cell
candace.skinner@scouting.org
 
Schedule a presentation in George Strake District  Brett Lee, District Director
(713) 598-1236, Cell
brett.lee@scouting.org
 
Schedule a presentation in Iron Horse District  Jack Jones, Field Director  
Schedule a presentation in Mustang District  Ashley Rex, Senior District Executive
(713) 560-0024, Cell
ashley.rex@scouting.org
 
Schedule a presentation in North Star District  Steven Forde, District Executive
(713) 598-2410, Cell
steven.forde@scouting.org
 
Schedule a presentation in Orion District  Heard Robinson, Senior District Executive
(713) 689-4619, Cell
heard.robinson@scouting.org
 
Schedule a presentation in Phoenix District  Drue Banta, District Executive
(979) 204-2826, Cell
drue.banta@scouting.org
  
Schedule a presentation in Raven District  Cornelia Berrocal, District Executive
(713) 689-8735, Cell
cornelia.berrocal@scouting.org
 
Schedule a presentation in San Jacinto District  Daisy Flores, District Director
(713) 598-2638, Cell
daisy.flores@scouting.org
 
Schedule a presentation in Skyline District  Erica Gillette, District Executive
(713) 598-5829, Cell
erica.gillette@scouting.org
 
Schedule a presentation in Soaring Eagle District  Cristal Razo, District Executive
(713) 679-8267, Cell
cristal.razo@scouting.org
 
Schedule a presentation in
Tall Timbers District
 
Mary Welch, Senior District Executive
(713) 805-7754, Cell
mary.welch@scouting.org
 
Schedule a presentation in Tatanka District  Gladys Mohamed, District Executive
(713) 817-0415, Cell
gladys.mohamed@scouting.org
  
Schedule a presentation in Texas Skies District  Juan Hernandez, District Director
(713) 726-6109, Cell
juan.hernandez@scouting.org
  
Schedule a presentation in Thunder Wolf District  Monica Carroll, Senior District Executive
(713) 598-7426, Cell
monica.carroll@scouting.org
  
Schedule a presentation in Twin Bayou District  Angelita Guerrero, Senior District Executive
(713) 598-4795, Cell
angelita.guerrero@scouting.org
 
Schedule a presentation in W.L. Davis District Sidney Castillo, Field Director  

 

 

 

 

Ethan Tree 

Posted by Darlene Scheffler Thursday, November 16, 2017 10:27:00 AM

Our local Scout Shops are once again providing an opportunity for the Scouting community to help local Scouts who may be in need of uniform and Scouting items. This help will be done through The Ethan Giving Tree program starting November 6 through December 18, 2017.

The Ethan Giving Tree program works on a donation basis. An Ethan Giving Tree (similar to an Angel Tree) will be set up at the Scout Shop with Ethan cards on it. Each card will have the first name of the Scout along with the items they need and other items they may want such as books, crafts, camping items, etc. Customers and Scouting supporters can purchase the item(s) in their local Scout Shop and give them to the store staff to collect for each child. We need your assistance to make this project a success. So, start shopping to help every Scout in need.

Find a Scout Shop Near You

 

Thanksgiving Hours

All Houston Area Scout Shops will be closed on Thursday, November 23, 2017, for the Thanksgiving holiday.

All stores will re-open on Friday, November 24, 2017 with normal hours.

 

 

                     

 

Houston Area Scout Shops

2225 North Loop West, Suite A
Houston, TX 77008
Marcus Jackson, manager
houstonscoutshop@scouting.org
(713) 865-5190
google map

Hours
Mon.-Fri.: 9 AM - 6 PM
Sat.: 10 AM - 5 PM
Closed Sunday

September only!
Saturday 9 AM - 6 PM

12300 Parc Crest Drive, Suite 130
Stafford, TX 77477
Inside the United Way building
John Pyle, manager
staffordscoutshop@scouting.org
(281) 207-2340
google map

Hours
Mon.-Fri.: 10 AM - 6 PM
Sat.: 10 AM - 3 PM
Closed Sunday

Strake Scout Shop
1188-B West Dallas St
Conroe, TX  77301
Diana Madrigal, manager
campstrakescoutshop@scouting.org
1-800-864-1568
google map


Hours
Mon. - Sat. : 10 AM - 6 PM
Closed Sunday 

6512 FM 1960 West (at Champion Dr)
Houston, TX 77069
Allen Adams, manager
champions1960scoutshop@scouting.org
(281) 444-1152
google map

Hours
Mon.-Fri.: 10 AM - 7 PM
Sat.: 10 AM - 5 PM
Closed Sunday

1300 Bay Area Blvd., Suite #101
Inside the United Way Bldg A
Houston, TX 77058
Kim Faught, manager
clearlakescoutshop@scouting.org
(281) 282-6067
google map

Hours
Mon.-Wed.: 10 AM - 6 PM
Thurs.: 10 AM - 7 PM
Fri.: 10 AM - 5 PM
Sat.: 10 AM - 3 PM
Closed Sunday

   The Houston Scout Shop is owned and operated by the Boy Scouts of America.

 

 

 

 

Shop on Amazon Smile and Amazon will donate to the Sam Houston Area Council 

Posted by Darlene Scheffler Wednesday, November 1, 2017 1:08:00 PM

Amazon Smile

AmazonSmile is a perfect way to support the Sam Houston of America.

  • Amazon will donate 0.5% of the price of your eligible AmazonSmile purchases to Sam Houston Area Council, Boy Scouts of America whenever you shop on AmazonSmile.
  • AmazonSmile is the same Amazon you know. Same products, same prices, same service.
  • Support Sam Houston Area Council by starting your shopping at smile.amazon.com.

 

Sam Houston Area Council, Boy Scouts of America

Additional ways to help ensure the success of Scouting in the Sam Houston Area Council with meaningful gifts include: company matching gifts, company volunteer grants or by donating cars, trucks, RVs, trailers, boats, motors, stocks, bonds, mutual funds, securities, uniforms, camping equipment and yes, even services.

Adventure Camp Spring Registration is Open 

Posted by Darlene Scheffler Friday, October 27, 2017 8:52:00 PM

Register Now for Spring

McNair Cub Scout Adventure Camp is an overnight, full program camp for all family members at Bovay Scout Ranch. Tigers, Wolves, Bears and Webelos and their families will enjoy an exciting variety of activities at several program areas and food service in the camp’s air-conditioned dining hall. A staff member in each area will provide program supplies and support the parents who will be invited to assist in leading the activities.

Conducted at the McNair Cub Scout Adventure Camp at Bovay Scout Ranch, McNair Cub Scout Adventure Camps may include: seeking treasure in the lost mine, archeological quest at the dinosaur dig, high speed pedal feat at the BMX bike track, Robin Hood style adventure at the archery range, marksmanship at the BB gun range, action at the K.S. “Bud” Adams sports field, exploring our camp at the nature center, and splashing in the water at the David Weekley Family Water Park (weather permitting).

Enjoy all the wonder and beauty of the central Texas rolling hills and lakes at Bovay Scout Ranch. Conveniently located just 60 minutes from downtown Houston, Bovay Scout Ranch can be found just three miles south of Navasota on the east side of Highway 6 on County Road 317.    

Registration

Packs, dens and individual families may register as a pack or individually. Pack registration is preferred to keep families together. Dens and families that register individually will be combined with dens and families from other packs. Registration is on a first-come, first-served basis and sessions fill up fast.

The fee for camp is $40 per person and includes three meals (lunch and dinner on Saturday and breakfast on Sunday with vegetarian and turkey patty options), patch and Scout’s program supplies. Children under five attend free of charge; please note that the program is designed for Scouts. Scouts must be members of the Boy Scouts of America. A $100 non-refundable deposit for the group secures a spot.

One adult per 15 youth in the pack may attend at no cost. This adult will be asked to volunteer to work as program staff and must attend the 8:00 am leader’s meeting. To ensure your camp reservation, registrations, including all fees, must be complete thirty (30) days prior to the camp date. For your convenience, Bovay offers limited quantities of patches, snacks, beverages, and t-shirts for sale in the camp store called Trader Vics.

Every adult attending Bovay Scout Ranch must follow Bovay’s policies and procedures located in the Leader's Guide and the Guide to Safe Scouting. Click on a date to register:

Camp Staff

Bovay Scout Ranch is looking for dedicated volunteers and paid staff to serve Scouting by working at McNair Cub Scout Adventure Camp throughout the year and Resident Camp during July. The requirements are stiff; the jobs are demanding; the experience is exhilarating. For applications, contact Geno Aguilar.
 

Frequently Asked Questions About McNair Adventure Camp

How are refunds handled?
See the refund policy.
Are vegetarian meals available?
Yes. Please contact Geno Aguilar at 713-756-3304 to place your request 30 days prior to your camping date.
What are the leadership requirements?

Every pack and den must provide two-deep leadership. Sufficient adult leadership must be provided on all trips and outings based on the total number of youth attending. Cub Scouts must bring at least one family member. Webelos may be under the direction of a Webelos leader, but Webelos leaders may not be responsible for more than one additional “nonfamily member” youth. Every adult must have a copy of their Youth Protection Training certificate taken online within last two years. Tiger Cubs are approved to participate in Adventure Camp, but must be accompanied by a parent or guardian at all times. Every Scout and child must be under the supervision of a leader, parent or guardian. Bovay follows all Guide to Safe Scouting rules.

One adult per pack (or registering group) must have a Hazardous Weather Training certificate (taken online within last two years).
What health form do I need to bring to Adventure Camp?
A copy of the BSA Annual Health and Medical Record (Parts A and B) must be turned in for every participant.
What do the fees include?
The fee for Adventure Camp is $40 per person and includes three meals (lunch and dinner on Saturday and breakfast on Sunday), patch, and Scout’s program supplies. Children under five attend free of charge; please note that the program is designed for Scouts.  Scouts must be members of the Boy Scouts of America.  

One adult per 15 youth in the pack may attend at no cost. This adult will be asked to volunteer to work as program staff and must attend the 8:00 a.m. leader’s meeting.
What are the check-in procedures?

Campers may check-in between 3:00 - 10:00 p.m. on Friday evening or between 7:00 - 9:00 a.m. on Saturday morning. The dining hall will be closed for Saturday breakfast so please plan accordingly. Programs begin on Saturday at 9:00 or 10:00 a.m. and run until 5:00 p.m. Campers will be served lunch and dinner on Saturday and breakfast Sunday morning.

The designated leader will check-in at registration office in the administration building (approximately one mile past the main gate on the left) and register the unit or group. Registration lines can be a long on busy weekends so please be patient. To facilitate a quicker registration process, please be sure to have all of the mandatory paperwork: 
1. Camp roster, two copies;
2. Youth Protection Training, copy of certificate for every adult;
3. Current BSA Annual Health and Medical Record (Part A & B for all Scouting events) for every participant, two copies alphabetized in an envelope or notebook (one to keep in campsite and one to turn in during registration);
4. Camp registration confirmation (printed receipt);
5. Hazardous Weather Training, copy of certificate for one adult in the group (taken online within past years).

When registration is complete, the staff will assign campsites and campers may then proceed to their campsite. All Bovay campsites have a pavilion with multiple picnic tables and a red fire water bucket. Distribute wristbands to all youth and adults. All persons onsite must wear their designated wristbands at all times. Wristband colors determine which rotation schedule the Scout should follow. Please follow the specified rotation schedule as the program is designed for a specific number of youth at each outpost.

What are the departure procedures?

Departure is after breakfast on Sunday. Camp closes at 11:00 am. On the morning of departure, the campmaster will drop off cleaning supplies at the restrooms. Follow the written instructions for cleaning assigned showers and restrooms. Scouts should conduct a “police line” where Scouts stand within arm’s length of each other and walk the entire campsite picking up all trash. The campmaster will inspect each campsite to make sure the campsite, restrooms, showers, and pavilions are undamaged and clean, and that all gear and trash is removed. After passing inspection, proceed to the administration building to sign out and pick up paperwork.

What is the schedule?
Tentative Schedule:

Friday

Check-in at administration building, camp set-up, dinner on own, pack free time between 3:00 – 10:00 pm

Leader's meetings in Safari Room at 8:00 pm

Saturday

Late check-in at administration building, camp set-up, breakfast on own from 7:00-9:00 am

Program activities

Lunch in dining hall

Program activities

Dinner in dining hall

Pack free time in campsites

Sunday

Breakfast in dining hall

Camp breakdown / Check-out

Camp closed at 11:00 am

Note:  You will receive the final rotation schedule at check-in. Schedules vary based on camp attendance.

What do we need to bring to Adventure Camp?

Bring:  Tent; sleeping bag, sheets, or blanket and pillow; cot or air mattress; toiletries (e.g., shampoo, toothbrush, deodorant); water bottle; towel and wash cloth; sunscreen; insect repellent; swimsuit; clothes appropriate for weather; rain gear, extra clothes; Scout uniform (determined by pack); closed toed shoes (tennis shoes) and extra pair; flashlight with fresh batteries; personal medication; first aid kit, one per registered group; BSA Annual Health and Medical Form, Part A & B; required for every participant; Small trash bags for restrooms; 55 gallon trash bags for campsite; Camper Release Form, for Scouts whose parents are not attending camp. All items should be marked with name and unit number.

Optional:  Alarm clock; battery operated lantern; bicycle and bike helmet; book of faith; camera; camp chair; Cub Scout handbook; fishing gear; glow sticks (great to keep track of your kids at night and to play games); lockable footlocker; money for trading post; shower shoes; snacks (do not keep in tent); sports drinks or flavor packets for water (to help keep Scouts hydrated); sunglasses

Adults also need to bring a copy for camp: 
1. Youth Protection Training, copy of certificate for every adult;
2. Hazardous Weather Training, copy of certificate for one adult in the unit (taken online within past years);
3. Roster, one for unit

What NOT to bring to camp:  Alcohol, electronics/game equipment, firearms, guns and ammunition, illegal drugs, liquid fuel lanterns or stoves, pets, scooters, skates, skateboards, valuables

Where can I find Bovay's policies?
Every adult attending Bovay Scout Ranch must be familiar with the complete leader’s guide (see the link to the leader's guide in the Resources section above), and the Guide to Safe Scouting.

Contacts

 

Vincent Manning
Bovay Scout Ranch Professional Advisor
 (713) 756-3380
 Vincent.Manning@scouting.org

 

 

 

Family Scouting Update 

Posted by Darlene Scheffler Wednesday, October 25, 2017 8:50:00 AM

Recently, the BSA’s Board of Directors unanimously approved welcoming girls into our iconic Cub Scout program and delivering a Scouting program for older girls that will enable them to advance and earn the highest rank of Eagle Scout. This decision comes after years of receiving requests from families and girls. The BSA evaluated the results of numerous research efforts, gaining input from current members and leaders — as well as parents and girls who’ve never been involved in Scouting — to understand how to offer families an important additional choice in meeting the character development needs of all their children.

Starting in the 2018 program year, families can choose to sign up their sons and daughters for Cub Scouts. Existing packs may choose to establish a new girl pack, establish a pack that consists of girl dens and boy dens or remains an all-boy pack. Cub Scout dens will be single-gender — all boys or all girls. Using the same curriculum as the Boy Scouts program, the organization will also deliver a program for older girls, which will be announced in 2018 and projected to be available in 2019, that will enable them to earn the Eagle Scout rank. This unique approach allows us to maintain the integrity of the single-gender model while also meeting the needs of today’s families. 

This decision expands the programs that the Boy Scouts of America offers for both boys and girls. Although known for our iconic programs for boys, the BSA has offered co-ed programs since 1971 through Exploring and the Venturing program, which celebrates its 20th anniversary in 2018. The STEM Scout pilot program is also available for both boys and girls.

Read BSA’s announcement and additional information regarding Family Scouting:

The Sam Houston Area Council will now begin to develop plans on how to implement these decisions as they become effective in 2018 and 2019.  We will keep our stakeholder groups informed using various platforms. 

As we develop these plans to pursue new opportunities to better serve families, we acknowledge the value of the programs of Girl Scouts of the USA respecting their importance in meeting the needs of girls and that our programs can be complementary in meeting the needs of families with girls.

We are proud of the healthy relationship our Sam Houston Area Council has with our sister organization, the Girl Scouts of San Jacinto Council. We have had ongoing discussions with the executive leadership of the Girl Scouts of San Jacinto Council. The leadership of our two organizations is in dialogue on how we can direct each of our resources and proven programs to meet the needs of youth and families in the communities we serve.

Five Things You Should Know about the Boy Scouts of America’s Program Expansion

Source

Cub Scouts

  1. Girls can join Cub Scouts in Fall 2018. Starting in August 2018, girls will be eligible to join the BSA's existing Cub Scouts program.
  2. Cub Scout dens will be single-gender — all boys or all girls. Cub Scout packs, meanwhile, will have local decision-making power to determine if I have a pack with only boy dens, a pack with boy dens and girl dens, or a pack with only girl dens.
  3. Charter organizations decide for their pack. A charter organization may choose to either remain an all-boy pack, have an all-girl pack, or a have a pack of girls and boys.

Boy Scouts

  1. A middle/high school age program for girls will launch in 2019. The BSA will announce a program for Boy Scout aged girls in 2018, which will launch in 2019. This program will parallel the current Boy Scout program, include the same curriculum and merit badges, and allow girls to earn the Eagle Scout rank.
  2. Program requirements will be the same for both genders. The BSA's existing programs for boys and the new programs for girls will operate under the same curriculum and requirements. There has been no indication in the information shared that would indicate any changes in the requirements. 



Family Program Questions and Answers

Decision and Rationale

Q. What decision did the BSA make regarding girls’ involvement in the organization?

The Boy Scouts of America’s Board of Directors unanimously approved to welcome girls into its iconic Cub Scout program and to deliver a Scouting program for older girls that will enable them to advance and earn the highest rank of Eagle Scout. It is important to note that the BSA did not decide to make the Cub Scouting and Boy Scouting programs co‐ed; instead, the organization has introduced a unique model that builds on the benefits of a single‐gender program while also providing character and leadership opportunities for both boys and girls.

Starting in 2018 (exact start date yet to be confirmed), families can choose to sign up their sons and daughters for Cub Scouts. Chartered partner organizations may choose to establish a new girl pack, establish a pack that consists of girl dens and boy dens or remain an all‐boy pack. Cub Scout dens will be single gender — all boys or all girls. Using the same curriculum as the Boy Scouts program, the organization will also deliver a new program for older girls, which will be announced in 2018 and projected to be available in 2019 (with a more specific start date to be determined soon), that will enable them to earn the Eagle Scout rank. This unique approach allows the organization to maintain the integrity of the single-gender model while also meeting the needs of today’s families.

Q. What do we know about the changing needs of today’s families?

The BSA is not only listening to our Scouting families, but also to those that haven’t joined theprogram. We understand that families today are busier and more diverse than ever.

  • Most are dual‐earners.
  • There are more single‐parent households than in previous decades.
  • Many underserved communities, including fastest‐growing Hispanic and Asian communities, prefer to participate in activities as a family.
  • And, all families have less free time. More than one‐third of parents feel they spend too little free time with their kids, and millennial parents are desperate to spend more time interacting with their kids.

Q. Is this change a result of the BSA’s declining membership numbers?

No. The BSA has experienced renewed interest in Scouting, and we believe that is largely in response to program innovation and a more thorough understanding of what families want and need when it comes to extracurricular activities. In fact, recent surveys of parents not involved with Scouting showed high interest in getting their daughters signed up for programs like Cub Scouts and Boy Scouts, with 90 percent expressing interest in a program like Cub Scouts and 87 percent expressing interest in a program like Boy Scouts. Following an evaluation of what families and young people want and need when it comes to extracurricular activities and Scouting, the BSA welcomes girls into expanded programs from Cub Scouts to the highest rank of Eagle Scout.

Q. Is this change a departure from the BSA’s core mission and values?

No. In fact, this aligns with our mission and values. After all, the values of Scouting as detailed in the 12 points of the Scout Law – trustworthy, loyal, helpful, friendly, courteous, kind, obedient, cheerful, thrifty, brave, clean and reverent – are relevant and important for both young men and women.

Our mission is to prepare young people to make ethical and moral choices over their lifetimes by instilling in them the values of the Scout Oath and Scout Law. To achieve our mission, we create innovative programs and evolve existing ones that respond to the needs of today’s families and deliver them through dedicated volunteers in communities across the nation.

Q. What research did the BSA conduct that informed this decision?

To inform this decision, the Boy Scouts of America conducted extensive research. The BSA also evaluated input from thousands of volunteers who participated in the nationwide family listening sessions.

The results were overwhelmingly positive and supported the decision to welcome girls into Cub Scouts and provide a path to earn the Eagle Scout rank. The research found that parents not involved with Scouting showed high interest in getting their daughters signed up for programs like Cub Scouts and Boy Scouts, with 90 percent expressing interest in a program like Cub Scouts and 87 percent expressing interest in a program like Boy Scouts. The BSA also surveyed young girls and found that 90 percent of girls age 11‐18 are interested in joining the BSA’s programs. Education experts also evaluated the curriculum and content and confirmed the relevance of the program for young women.

Q. Are BSA programs relevant for girls?

Yes. On average, more than 90 percent of Scouting families and leaders believe the BSA programs are relevant to both boys and girls. What’s more, education experts also evaluated the curriculum and content and confirmed the relevance of the program for young women.

Q. Why didn’t the BSA partner with the Girl Scouts or another organization to serve girls?

The BSA had several conversations with other youth‐serving organizations, but found through extensive research and conversations with parents that there is a need and an interest to welcome girls to our existing programs. We celebrate all youth‐serving organizations that build character and feel the most important thing is to allow parents the ability to choose the program that is best for their family. What’s more, the BSA has been providing programs to young girls since 1971 when we extended our Exploring program to young women. Girls also participate in our Venturing, Sea Scouts and STEM Scouts programs.

Q. How are the BSA programs different from what girls would experience with Girl Scouts?

BSA programs provide character‐ and leadership‐building experiences that give young people a solid foundation for their futures. We celebrate all youth‐serving organizations that build character and feel the most important thing is to allow parents the ability to choose what program is best for their family.

Q. Why are you just now allowing girls into the Boy Scouts?

The BSA’s decision to welcome girls into the Cub Scout program and to offer a program for older girls comes from input we have received from our Scouting families, as well as prospective Scouting families. We understand that families today are busier and more diverse than ever. The BSA believes we owe it to families to structure our program offerings in a way that fits into their busy lives to deliver character development and values‐based leadership training that Scouting promises. It is important to underscore that the BSA has provided programming to young women and young men for many years through Sea Scouts, STEM Scouts, Exploring and Venturing.

  • STEM Scouts: 45% of participants are girls/young women, 55% are boys/young men
  • Exploring: 39% of participants are girls/young women, 61% are boys/young men
  • Venturing: 23% of participants are girls/young women, 77% are boys/young men
  • Sea Scouts: 40% of participants are girls/young women, 60% are boys/young men

Q. Why is the BSA recommending single‐gender units instead of a co‐ed model?

The leadership of the BSA determined that the best way to welcome girls to serve today’s families was to offer a unique model that builds on the proven benefits of our single‐gender program, while also providing character and leadership opportunities for both boys and girls.

Community Response

Q. What are you hearing from BSA leaders around the country about this announcement?

The decision was informed by members of the BSA at all levels of the organization and from all parts of the country, so we are seeing support for the decision reflect that input. This is an exciting time for the BSA. We value the partnership with BSA leaders across the country as we continue to innovate and evolve our proven programs to meet the needs of today’s families and provide the types of experiences that parents and their children want most.

Q. Do you think current youth members or adult volunteers will withdraw?

The decision to welcome girls into expanded programs from Cub Scouts to Eagle Scout rank presents several opportunities for families to get their youth involved in a program that has been proven to deliver character and leadership traits that parents say they desire for their children. A Tufts University study found that youth who participate in Scouting for even a short period of time exhibit strong moral values and positive character attributes, allowing them to embrace new opportunities, overcome obstacles and become better prepared for future success. This programming is in response to what we’ve heard from our Scouting families in addition to those who are not involved in the BSA. A majority of parents surveyed said they are interested in having their daughters involved in a program like the Cub Scouts and Boy Scouts. What’s more, many of our current families, Scouts, donors, volunteers and professional staff are in support of this decision. We are confident that this change will meet the needs of today’s families.

Q. How do you know parents will sign their daughters up for Cub Scouts and Boy Scouts?

The BSA originally began discussions about young girls in Scouting based on numerous requests from families. We recognized a need and worked to understand how we could meet it. In addition to conversations with parents, recent surveys of parents not involved with Scouting showed high interest in getting their daughters signed up for programs like Cub Scouts and Boy Scouts, with 90 percent expressing interest in a program like Cub Scouts and 87 percent expressing interest in a program like Boy Scouts. We made this change so we could bring the benefits of Scouting to the greatest number of youth possible, all while staying true to our mission and core values outlined in the Scout Oath and Scout Law.

Q. What are the Girl Scouts saying about this expanded program for girls?

The BSA had several conversations with other youth‐serving organizations, but found through extensive research and conversations with parents that there is a need and an interest to welcome girls to our existing programs. We celebrate all youth‐serving organizations that build character and feel the most important thing is to allow parents the ability to choose what program is best for their family. What’s more, the BSA has been providing programs to young girls since 1971 when we extended our Exploring program to young women. Young girls also participate in our Venturing, Sea Scouts and STEM Scouts.

Operations and Implementation

Q. Is this for all levels of Scouting?

Starting in 2018 (exact start date yet to be confirmed), families can choose to sign up their sons and daughters for Cub Scouts. Existing packs may choose to establish a new girl pack, establish a pack that consists of girl dens and boy dens or remain an all‐boy pack. Cub Scout dens will be single gender — all boys or all girls. Using the same curriculum as the Boy Scouts program, the organization will also deliver a program for older girls, which will be announced in 2018 and projected to be available in 2019 (with a more specific start date to be determined soon), that will enable them to earn the Eagle Scout rank. This unique approach allows the organization to maintain the integrity of the single‐gender model while also meeting the needs of today’s families.

Q. How will the BSA respond to parents who don’t want coeducational programs?

It is important to note that BSA did not decide to make the Cub Scouts and Boy Scouts programs co‐ed; instead, the organization has introduced a unique model that builds on the benefits of a single‐gender program while also providing character and leadership opportunities for both boys and girls. Starting in 2018, families can choose to sign up their sons and daughters for Cub Scouts. Chartered partner organizations may choose to establish a new girl pack, establish a pack that consists of girl dens and boy dens or remain an all‐boy pack. Cub Scout dens will be single gender — all boys or all girls. Using the same curriculum as the Boy Scouts program, the organization will also deliver a new program for older girls, which will be announced in 2018 and projected to be available in 2019 (with a more specific start date to be determined soon), that will enable them to earn the Eagle Scout rank. This unique approach allows the organization to maintain the integrity of the single-gender model while also meeting the needs of today’s families.

Q. How soon can we integrate girls into packs? Can we have a “soft” roll out?

The implementation team has not yet finalized an official start date. Scout executives will receive notification as soon as timing is confirmed by the BSA National Executive Committee. Until then, it is recommended that all units that receive interest in the program from their community develop a list with contact information so that they can reach out to those interested when the details are finalized.

Q. At what age can girls join Scouting?

In 2018, families can choose Cub Scouts for their sons and daughters, starting at age six. A chartered partner may also decide to invite Kindergarten‐age girls to a den participating in the Lion program.

Q. Will you change the organization’s name?

The Boy Scouts of America, in name and as an organization, has stood for character development and values‐based leadership training for more than 107 years. It is, unequivocally, one of the most recognized, respected and valuable brands on the planet. Therefore, while we have expanded the reach of our programs among today’s youth and their families, our name remains the same, and our brand will continue to be a source of pride that we will protect and foster as we look to extend the reach of our promise to more families.

Q. In what cities/states will this program be available?

BSA’s programs are offered to youth nationwide.

Q. Will girls be able to earn the same merit badges?

Yes. Since merit badges are currently earned in the Boy Scout program, girls will be able to earn merit badges through the Scouting program for older girls that will be announced in 2018 and is projected to be implemented in 2019, with a more specific start date to be determined soon.

Q. Do chartered organizations have a choice whether or not to adopt the expanded program?

Yes. Charter organizations always have the option to select from the numerous BSA program offerings. They can select all or one of the BSA programs that they feel best meet the needs of their members and the communities around them.

Q. Will there be new curriculum for girl participants? Will you change the program to accommodate girls?

No. Our existing programs are relevant for young men and women. After all, the values of Scouting as outlined in the Scout Law – trustworthy, loyal, helpful, friendly, courteous, kind, obedient, cheerful, thrifty, brave, clean and reverent – are relevant and important values for both young men and women.

Q. Will girls have to meet the same requirement to achieve Eagle Scout?

Yes. Our goal is for young women to aspire to and achieve the Eagle Scout rank by meeting the same criteria and achievements as young men.

Q. How will packs and dens be structured? Can a chartered organization choose not to include girls?

An existing chartering organization may choose to serve girls or remain an all‐boy pack. When creating a new pack, a chartered organization may form an all‐boy pack, an all‐girl pack, multiple packs or a pack of girl dens and boy dens. Cub Scout dens will be single gender — all boys or all girls. Cub Scout packs, meanwhile, can include any combination of all‐boy or all‐girl dens. The choice is left to individual leaders in consultation with their chartered organization. This hybrid model builds on the benefit of a single‐gender program while also providing character and leadership opportunities for both boys and girls.

Q. If I have a question about how to incorporate girls into the pack, who should I talk to?

In an overwhelming number of existing packs across the country, girls have already informally been participating in activities, including pack meetings and family camping, so the BSA doesn’t foresee major issues in welcoming girls officially to packs. Because the program itself is not changing, your unit commissioner would be the most knowledgeable person to talk to about the Scouting program. Your district executive is also a resource.

Q. What updates to youth protection will be implemented to ensure the safety of boys and girls?

Youth protection and safety is paramount in all of the BSA’s programs. We invest resources and time to continuously strengthen our youth protection program. At the Cub Scout level, the program is already designed for the family, and we’ve had sisters of Cub Scouts participating in activities for many years – that was one of the reasons we were moved to consider this decision. Young women have been part of Venturing for two decades, and the current youth protection requirements already apply to both male and female participants. Two‐deep leadership is required at all meetings, events and outings. This is a minimum requirement and additional supervision may be necessary, depending on the nature of the activities and the size of the group. As we deliver this additional program for older girls, we will be evaluating any changes needed to ensure the safety of all youth.

Q. What about camping with girls?

Since camping in the Cub Scout program includes the entire family, the Cub Scout outdoor family camping guidelines are still in place regardless of a pack’s composition. Camping guidelines for older girl participants will be confirmed when the organization announces the Scouting program for older girls in 2018, for implementation in 2019. As a point of reference, young women have been part of Venturing for two decades, and the current youth protection requirements already apply to both male and female participants. Twodeep leadership is required at all meetings, events and outings. This is a minimum requirement and additional supervision may be necessary, depending on the nature of the activities and the size of the group. As always, the BSA continues to evaluate and improve our youth protection training across all programs. In Venturing, when an activity includes both boys and girls, at least one adult male and one adult female must be present at the activity, one of whom must be registered as an adult member of the BSA.

Q. Will girls be allowed into the Order of the Arrow?

Youth members that join the Scouting program for older girls (11 to 18) will be eligible to join a Scouting honor society. Details about a Scouting honor society for girls will be shared when plans for an older girl program are announced in 2018 for implementation in 2019.

Q. May an adult male lead an all‐girl unit?

Yes, an adult male can lead an all‐girl unit, just as we already have adult females leading all boy programs. Youth protection requirements still apply to both male and female participants. Two-deep leadership is required at all meetings, events and outings. This is a minimum requirement and additional supervision may be necessary, depending on the nature of the activities and the size of the group.

Q. Should dens for girls and dens for boys meet at the same time and place?

It is up to the pack or the den to decide meeting times and places.

Q. Can separate boy and girl dens work on the same activity at the same time together?

There is no set rule or guideline on this. If appropriate, this can be treated the same as two dens of the same gender working together. It will be up to the good judgement of leaders to decide what is best for their units.

Q. Will we have different uniforms for boys and girls?

All uniforms continue to be reviewed and adjusted to meet participant needs. While the fit and styling may be a bit different, the uniforms will remain fundamentally the same.

Q. Will the basic training courses be modified to include some specifics on working with girls and addressing their specific developmental needs?

Yes, we will evaluate our training and update materials as needed.

Q. What facility changes will need to happen at our camps?

The Boy Scouts of America has been serving young women for decades. Councils will evaluate their program facilities and make any needed changes.

Q. Will current Venturers get credit for their crew leadership roles if the girls join a troop and need leadership experience for advancement?

Advancement guidelines for older girl participants will be confirmed when the organization announces the Scouting program for older girls in 2018.

Q. Will the expansion be rolled out like a pilot, or implemented all at one time?

The Boy Scouts of America’s Board of Directors unanimously approved to welcome girls into its iconic Cub Scout program and to deliver a Scouting program for older girls that will enable them to advance and earn the highest rank of Eagle Scout. This will not be handled as a pilot.

Q. How do units respond to girls who want to join BSA programs immediately?

We are excited to welcome girls who are interested in joining the Cub Scouting program in 2018. The implementation team has not yet finalized an official start date. Scout executives will receive notification as soon as timing is confirmed by the Executive Committee. Until then, it is recommended that all units that receive interest in the program from their community develop a list with contact information so they can reach out to those interested when the details are finalized.

Q. Have major chartered partners met and weighed in on this change?

Chartered partners were consulted throughout the research and evaluation process. Since the decision we have received supportive feedback from a number of our partners.

Q. What is being done to help us with diversity?

Diversity continues to be important to the Boy Scouts of America. We are dedicated to creating an environment that welcomes diversity and inclusion at all levels of the organization in order to best meet the needs of today’s youth, families, and communities. Our focus goes beyond ethnicity to include gender and generational diversity, which we believe add to the richness of the BSA through the exchange of ideas from people with various backgrounds and experiences.

Q. Will girls who enter in the fall of 2018 as Arrow of Light have a troop ready to accept them at crossover time in 2019?

Yes, we expect that the Scouting program for older girls will be ready to accept participants in 2019. A specific start date has yet to be confirmed.

 

 

 

 

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