Blog Post List

Family Scouting Update 

Posted by Darlene Scheffler Wednesday, October 25, 2017 8:50:00 AM

Recently, the BSA’s Board of Directors unanimously approved welcoming girls into our iconic Cub Scout program and delivering a Scouting program for older girls that will enable them to advance and earn the highest rank of Eagle Scout. This decision comes after years of receiving requests from families and girls. The BSA evaluated the results of numerous research efforts, gaining input from current members and leaders — as well as parents and girls who’ve never been involved in Scouting — to understand how to offer families an important additional choice in meeting the character development needs of all their children.

Starting in the 2018 program year, families can choose to sign up their sons and daughters for Cub Scouts. Existing packs may choose to establish a new girl pack, establish a pack that consists of girl dens and boy dens or remains an all-boy pack. Cub Scout dens will be single-gender — all boys or all girls. Using the same curriculum as the Boy Scouts program, the organization will also deliver a program for older girls, which will be announced in 2018 and projected to be available in 2019, that will enable them to earn the Eagle Scout rank. This unique approach allows us to maintain the integrity of the single-gender model while also meeting the needs of today’s families. 

This decision expands the programs that the Boy Scouts of America offers for both boys and girls. Although known for our iconic programs for boys, the BSA has offered co-ed programs since 1971 through Exploring and the Venturing program, which celebrates its 20th anniversary in 2018. The STEM Scout pilot program is also available for both boys and girls.

Read BSA’s announcement and additional information regarding Family Scouting:

The Sam Houston Area Council will now begin to develop plans on how to implement these decisions as they become effective in 2018 and 2019.  We will keep our stakeholder groups informed using various platforms. 

As we develop these plans to pursue new opportunities to better serve families, we acknowledge the value of the programs of Girl Scouts of the USA respecting their importance in meeting the needs of girls and that our programs can be complementary in meeting the needs of families with girls.

We are proud of the healthy relationship our Sam Houston Area Council has with our sister organization, the Girl Scouts of San Jacinto Council. We have had ongoing discussions with the executive leadership of the Girl Scouts of San Jacinto Council. The leadership of our two organizations is in dialogue on how we can direct each of our resources and proven programs to meet the needs of youth and families in the communities we serve.

Five Things You Should Know about the Boy Scouts of America’s Program Expansion

Source: October 2017

Cub Scouts

  1. Girls can join Cub Scouts in Fall 2018. Starting in August 2018, girls will be eligible to join the BSA's existing Cub Scouts program.
  2. Cub Scout dens will be single-gender — all boys or all girls. Cub Scout packs, meanwhile, will have local decision-making power to determine if I have a pack with only boy dens, a pack with boy dens and girl dens, or a pack with only girl dens.
  3. Charter organizations decide for their pack. A charter organization may choose to either remain an all-boy pack, have an all-girl pack, or a have a pack of girls and boys.

Boy Scouts

  1. A middle/high school age program for girls will launch in 2019. The BSA will announce a program for Boy Scout aged girls in 2018, which will launch in 2019. This program will parallel the current Boy Scout program, include the same curriculum and merit badges, and allow girls to earn the Eagle Scout rank.
  2. Program requirements will be the same for both genders. The BSA's existing programs for boys and the new programs for girls will operate under the same curriculum and requirements. There has been no indication in the information shared that would indicate any changes in the requirements. 



Family Program Questions and Answers

Decision and Rationale

Q. What decision did the BSA make regarding girls’ involvement in the organization?

The Boy Scouts of America’s Board of Directors unanimously approved to welcome girls into its iconic Cub Scout program and to deliver a Scouting program for older girls that will enable them to advance and earn the highest rank of Eagle Scout. It is important to note that the BSA did not decide to make the Cub Scouting and Boy Scouting programs co‐ed; instead, the organization has introduced a unique model that builds on the benefits of a single‐gender program while also providing character and leadership opportunities for both boys and girls.

Starting in 2018 (exact start date yet to be confirmed), families can choose to sign up their sons and daughters for Cub Scouts. Chartered partner organizations may choose to establish a new girl pack, establish a pack that consists of girl dens and boy dens or remain an all‐boy pack. Cub Scout dens will be single gender — all boys or all girls. Using the same curriculum as the Boy Scouts program, the organization will also deliver a new program for older girls, which will be announced in 2018 and projected to be available in 2019 (with a more specific start date to be determined soon), that will enable them to earn the Eagle Scout rank. This unique approach allows the organization to maintain the integrity of the single-gender model while also meeting the needs of today’s families.

Q. What do we know about the changing needs of today’s families?

The BSA is not only listening to our Scouting families, but also to those that haven’t joined theprogram. We understand that families today are busier and more diverse than ever.

  • Most are dual‐earners.
  • There are more single‐parent households than in previous decades.
  • Many underserved communities, including fastest‐growing Hispanic and Asian communities, prefer to participate in activities as a family.
  • And, all families have less free time. More than one‐third of parents feel they spend too little free time with their kids, and millennial parents are desperate to spend more time interacting with their kids.

Q. Is this change a result of the BSA’s declining membership numbers?

No. The BSA has experienced renewed interest in Scouting, and we believe that is largely in response to program innovation and a more thorough understanding of what families want and need when it comes to extracurricular activities. In fact, recent surveys of parents not involved with Scouting showed high interest in getting their daughters signed up for programs like Cub Scouts and Boy Scouts, with 90 percent expressing interest in a program like Cub Scouts and 87 percent expressing interest in a program like Boy Scouts. Following an evaluation of what families and young people want and need when it comes to extracurricular activities and Scouting, the BSA welcomes girls into expanded programs from Cub Scouts to the highest rank of Eagle Scout.

Q. Is this change a departure from the BSA’s core mission and values?

No. In fact, this aligns with our mission and values. After all, the values of Scouting as detailed in the 12 points of the Scout Law – trustworthy, loyal, helpful, friendly, courteous, kind, obedient, cheerful, thrifty, brave, clean and reverent – are relevant and important for both young men and women.

Our mission is to prepare young people to make ethical and moral choices over their lifetimes by instilling in them the values of the Scout Oath and Scout Law. To achieve our mission, we create innovative programs and evolve existing ones that respond to the needs of today’s families and deliver them through dedicated volunteers in communities across the nation.

Q. What research did the BSA conduct that informed this decision?

To inform this decision, the Boy Scouts of America conducted extensive research. The BSA also evaluated input from thousands of volunteers who participated in the nationwide family listening sessions.

The results were overwhelmingly positive and supported the decision to welcome girls into Cub Scouts and provide a path to earn the Eagle Scout rank. The research found that parents not involved with Scouting showed high interest in getting their daughters signed up for programs like Cub Scouts and Boy Scouts, with 90 percent expressing interest in a program like Cub Scouts and 87 percent expressing interest in a program like Boy Scouts. The BSA also surveyed young girls and found that 90 percent of girls age 11‐18 are interested in joining the BSA’s programs. Education experts also evaluated the curriculum and content and confirmed the relevance of the program for young women.

Q. Are BSA programs relevant for girls?

Yes. On average, more than 90 percent of Scouting families and leaders believe the BSA programs are relevant to both boys and girls. What’s more, education experts also evaluated the curriculum and content and confirmed the relevance of the program for young women.

Q. Why didn’t the BSA partner with the Girl Scouts or another organization to serve girls?

The BSA had several conversations with other youth‐serving organizations, but found through extensive research and conversations with parents that there is a need and an interest to welcome girls to our existing programs. We celebrate all youth‐serving organizations that build character and feel the most important thing is to allow parents the ability to choose the program that is best for their family. What’s more, the BSA has been providing programs to young girls since 1971 when we extended our Exploring program to young women. Girls also participate in our Venturing, Sea Scouts and STEM Scouts programs.

Q. How are the BSA programs different from what girls would experience with Girl Scouts?

BSA programs provide character‐ and leadership‐building experiences that give young people a solid foundation for their futures. We celebrate all youth‐serving organizations that build character and feel the most important thing is to allow parents the ability to choose what program is best for their family.

Q. Why are you just now allowing girls into the Boy Scouts?

The BSA’s decision to welcome girls into the Cub Scout program and to offer a program for older girls comes from input we have received from our Scouting families, as well as prospective Scouting families. We understand that families today are busier and more diverse than ever. The BSA believes we owe it to families to structure our program offerings in a way that fits into their busy lives to deliver character development and values‐based leadership training that Scouting promises. It is important to underscore that the BSA has provided programming to young women and young men for many years through Sea Scouts, STEM Scouts, Exploring and Venturing.

  • STEM Scouts: 45% of participants are girls/young women, 55% are boys/young men
  • Exploring: 39% of participants are girls/young women, 61% are boys/young men
  • Venturing: 23% of participants are girls/young women, 77% are boys/young men
  • Sea Scouts: 40% of participants are girls/young women, 60% are boys/young men

Q. Why is the BSA recommending single‐gender units instead of a co‐ed model?

The leadership of the BSA determined that the best way to welcome girls to serve today’s families was to offer a unique model that builds on the proven benefits of our single‐gender program, while also providing character and leadership opportunities for both boys and girls.

Community Response

Q. What are you hearing from BSA leaders around the country about this announcement?

The decision was informed by members of the BSA at all levels of the organization and from all parts of the country, so we are seeing support for the decision reflect that input. This is an exciting time for the BSA. We value the partnership with BSA leaders across the country as we continue to innovate and evolve our proven programs to meet the needs of today’s families and provide the types of experiences that parents and their children want most.

Q. Do you think current youth members or adult volunteers will withdraw?

The decision to welcome girls into expanded programs from Cub Scouts to Eagle Scout rank presents several opportunities for families to get their youth involved in a program that has been proven to deliver character and leadership traits that parents say they desire for their children. A Tufts University study found that youth who participate in Scouting for even a short period of time exhibit strong moral values and positive character attributes, allowing them to embrace new opportunities, overcome obstacles and become better prepared for future success. This programming is in response to what we’ve heard from our Scouting families in addition to those who are not involved in the BSA. A majority of parents surveyed said they are interested in having their daughters involved in a program like the Cub Scouts and Boy Scouts. What’s more, many of our current families, Scouts, donors, volunteers and professional staff are in support of this decision. We are confident that this change will meet the needs of today’s families.

Q. How do you know parents will sign their daughters up for Cub Scouts and Boy Scouts?

The BSA originally began discussions about young girls in Scouting based on numerous requests from families. We recognized a need and worked to understand how we could meet it. In addition to conversations with parents, recent surveys of parents not involved with Scouting showed high interest in getting their daughters signed up for programs like Cub Scouts and Boy Scouts, with 90 percent expressing interest in a program like Cub Scouts and 87 percent expressing interest in a program like Boy Scouts. We made this change so we could bring the benefits of Scouting to the greatest number of youth possible, all while staying true to our mission and core values outlined in the Scout Oath and Scout Law.

Q. What are the Girl Scouts saying about this expanded program for girls?

The BSA had several conversations with other youth‐serving organizations, but found through extensive research and conversations with parents that there is a need and an interest to welcome girls to our existing programs. We celebrate all youth‐serving organizations that build character and feel the most important thing is to allow parents the ability to choose what program is best for their family. What’s more, the BSA has been providing programs to young girls since 1971 when we extended our Exploring program to young women. Young girls also participate in our Venturing, Sea Scouts and STEM Scouts.

Operations and Implementation

Q. Is this for all levels of Scouting?

Starting in 2018 (exact start date yet to be confirmed), families can choose to sign up their sons and daughters for Cub Scouts. Existing packs may choose to establish a new girl pack, establish a pack that consists of girl dens and boy dens or remain an all‐boy pack. Cub Scout dens will be single gender — all boys or all girls. Using the same curriculum as the Boy Scouts program, the organization will also deliver a program for older girls, which will be announced in 2018 and projected to be available in 2019 (with a more specific start date to be determined soon), that will enable them to earn the Eagle Scout rank. This unique approach allows the organization to maintain the integrity of the single‐gender model while also meeting the needs of today’s families.

Q. How will the BSA respond to parents who don’t want coeducational programs?

It is important to note that BSA did not decide to make the Cub Scouts and Boy Scouts programs co‐ed; instead, the organization has introduced a unique model that builds on the benefits of a single‐gender program while also providing character and leadership opportunities for both boys and girls. Starting in 2018, families can choose to sign up their sons and daughters for Cub Scouts. Chartered partner organizations may choose to establish a new girl pack, establish a pack that consists of girl dens and boy dens or remain an all‐boy pack. Cub Scout dens will be single gender — all boys or all girls. Using the same curriculum as the Boy Scouts program, the organization will also deliver a new program for older girls, which will be announced in 2018 and projected to be available in 2019 (with a more specific start date to be determined soon), that will enable them to earn the Eagle Scout rank. This unique approach allows the organization to maintain the integrity of the single-gender model while also meeting the needs of today’s families.

Q. How soon can we integrate girls into packs? Can we have a “soft” roll out?

The implementation team has not yet finalized an official start date. Scout executives will receive notification as soon as timing is confirmed by the BSA National Executive Committee. Until then, it is recommended that all units that receive interest in the program from their community develop a list with contact information so that they can reach out to those interested when the details are finalized.

Q. At what age can girls join Scouting?

In 2018, families can choose Cub Scouts for their sons and daughters, starting at age six. A chartered partner may also decide to invite Kindergarten‐age girls to a den participating in the Lion program.

Q. Will you change the organization’s name?

The Boy Scouts of America, in name and as an organization, has stood for character development and values‐based leadership training for more than 107 years. It is, unequivocally, one of the most recognized, respected and valuable brands on the planet. Therefore, while we have expanded the reach of our programs among today’s youth and their families, our name remains the same, and our brand will continue to be a source of pride that we will protect and foster as we look to extend the reach of our promise to more families.

Q. In what cities/states will this program be available?

BSA’s programs are offered to youth nationwide.

Q. Will girls be able to earn the same merit badges?

Yes. Since merit badges are currently earned in the Boy Scout program, girls will be able to earn merit badges through the Scouting program for older girls that will be announced in 2018 and is projected to be implemented in 2019, with a more specific start date to be determined soon.

Q. Do chartered organizations have a choice whether or not to adopt the expanded program?

Yes. Charter organizations always have the option to select from the numerous BSA program offerings. They can select all or one of the BSA programs that they feel best meet the needs of their members and the communities around them.

Q. Will there be new curriculum for girl participants? Will you change the program to accommodate girls?

No. Our existing programs are relevant for young men and women. After all, the values of Scouting as outlined in the Scout Law – trustworthy, loyal, helpful, friendly, courteous, kind, obedient, cheerful, thrifty, brave, clean and reverent – are relevant and important values for both young men and women.

Q. Will girls have to meet the same requirement to achieve Eagle Scout?

Yes. Our goal is for young women to aspire to and achieve the Eagle Scout rank by meeting the same criteria and achievements as young men.

Q. How will packs and dens be structured? Can a chartered organization choose not to include girls?

An existing chartering organization may choose to serve girls or remain an all‐boy pack. When creating a new pack, a chartered organization may form an all‐boy pack, an all‐girl pack, multiple packs or a pack of girl dens and boy dens. Cub Scout dens will be single gender — all boys or all girls. Cub Scout packs, meanwhile, can include any combination of all‐boy or all‐girl dens. The choice is left to individual leaders in consultation with their chartered organization. This hybrid model builds on the benefit of a single‐gender program while also providing character and leadership opportunities for both boys and girls.

Q. If I have a question about how to incorporate girls into the pack, who should I talk to?

In an overwhelming number of existing packs across the country, girls have already informally been participating in activities, including pack meetings and family camping, so the BSA doesn’t foresee major issues in welcoming girls officially to packs. Because the program itself is not changing, your unit commissioner would be the most knowledgeable person to talk to about the Scouting program. Your district executive is also a resource.

Q. What updates to youth protection will be implemented to ensure the safety of boys and girls?

Youth protection and safety is paramount in all of the BSA’s programs. We invest resources and time to continuously strengthen our youth protection program. At the Cub Scout level, the program is already designed for the family, and we’ve had sisters of Cub Scouts participating in activities for many years – that was one of the reasons we were moved to consider this decision. Young women have been part of Venturing for two decades, and the current youth protection requirements already apply to both male and female participants. Two‐deep leadership is required at all meetings, events and outings. This is a minimum requirement and additional supervision may be necessary, depending on the nature of the activities and the size of the group. As we deliver this additional program for older girls, we will be evaluating any changes needed to ensure the safety of all youth.

Q. What about camping with girls?

Since camping in the Cub Scout program includes the entire family, the Cub Scout outdoor family camping guidelines are still in place regardless of a pack’s composition. Camping guidelines for older girl participants will be confirmed when the organization announces the Scouting program for older girls in 2018, for implementation in 2019. As a point of reference, young women have been part of Venturing for two decades, and the current youth protection requirements already apply to both male and female participants. Twodeep leadership is required at all meetings, events and outings. This is a minimum requirement and additional supervision may be necessary, depending on the nature of the activities and the size of the group. As always, the BSA continues to evaluate and improve our youth protection training across all programs. In Venturing, when an activity includes both boys and girls, at least one adult male and one adult female must be present at the activity, one of whom must be registered as an adult member of the BSA.

Q. Will girls be allowed into the Order of the Arrow?

Youth members that join the Scouting program for older girls (11 to 18) will be eligible to join a Scouting honor society. Details about a Scouting honor society for girls will be shared when plans for an older girl program are announced in 2018 for implementation in 2019.

Q. May an adult male lead an all‐girl unit?

Yes, an adult male can lead an all‐girl unit, just as we already have adult females leading all boy programs. Youth protection requirements still apply to both male and female participants. Two-deep leadership is required at all meetings, events and outings. This is a minimum requirement and additional supervision may be necessary, depending on the nature of the activities and the size of the group.

Q. Should dens for girls and dens for boys meet at the same time and place?

It is up to the pack or the den to decide meeting times and places.

Q. Can separate boy and girl dens work on the same activity at the same time together?

There is no set rule or guideline on this. If appropriate, this can be treated the same as two dens of the same gender working together. It will be up to the good judgement of leaders to decide what is best for their units.

Q. Will we have different uniforms for boys and girls?

All uniforms continue to be reviewed and adjusted to meet participant needs. While the fit and styling may be a bit different, the uniforms will remain fundamentally the same.

Q. Will the basic training courses be modified to include some specifics on working with girls and addressing their specific developmental needs?

Yes, we will evaluate our training and update materials as needed.

Q. What facility changes will need to happen at our camps?

The Boy Scouts of America has been serving young women for decades. Councils will evaluate their program facilities and make any needed changes.

Q. Will current Venturers get credit for their crew leadership roles if the girls join a troop and need leadership experience for advancement?

Advancement guidelines for older girl participants will be confirmed when the organization announces the Scouting program for older girls in 2018.

Q. Will the expansion be rolled out like a pilot, or implemented all at one time?

The Boy Scouts of America’s Board of Directors unanimously approved to welcome girls into its iconic Cub Scout program and to deliver a Scouting program for older girls that will enable them to advance and earn the highest rank of Eagle Scout. This will not be handled as a pilot.

Q. How do units respond to girls who want to join BSA programs immediately?

We are excited to welcome girls who are interested in joining the Cub Scouting program in 2018. The implementation team has not yet finalized an official start date. Scout executives will receive notification as soon as timing is confirmed by the Executive Committee. Until then, it is recommended that all units that receive interest in the program from their community develop a list with contact information so they can reach out to those interested when the details are finalized.

Q. Have major chartered partners met and weighed in on this change?

Chartered partners were consulted throughout the research and evaluation process. Since the decision we have received supportive feedback from a number of our partners.

Q. What is being done to help us with diversity?

Diversity continues to be important to the Boy Scouts of America. We are dedicated to creating an environment that welcomes diversity and inclusion at all levels of the organization in order to best meet the needs of today’s youth, families, and communities. Our focus goes beyond ethnicity to include gender and generational diversity, which we believe add to the richness of the BSA through the exchange of ideas from people with various backgrounds and experiences.

Q. Will girls who enter in the fall of 2018 as Arrow of Light have a troop ready to accept them at crossover time in 2019?

Yes, we expect that the Scouting program for older girls will be ready to accept participants in 2019. A specific start date has yet to be confirmed.

 

 

 

 

Scouts First Helpline 

Posted by Darlene Scheffler Wednesday, October 25, 2017 7:45:00 AM

'Scouts First' Helpline for Abuse and Youth Protection

BSA, Our Commitment

The protection of youth is the primary obligation of every individual involved in the Boy Scouts of America — including leaders, parents, members and professionals. The BSA has been and will continue to be vigilant in its efforts to create barriers that help prevent abuse and to recognize and report child abuse regardless of where it occurs.

Nationwide, the BSA requires everyone involved with Scouting to report any known or suspected abuse to local authorities.

Scouts First Helpline

As part of the BSA’s “Scouts First” approach to the protection and safety of youth, the BSA has established a dedicated 24-hour helpline at 844-SCOUTS FIRST (844-726-8871) to receive reports of any known or suspected abuse or significant violations of youth protection policies that might put a youth at risk.

24-hour helpline: 844-SCOUTS FIRST (844-726-8871)

The helpline’s goal is to provide immediate assistance to BSA professionals in the investigation, reporting and dealing with abuse allegations or to ensure that the victim, unit, and council are fully supported and the actions taken are properly documented.  All known or suspected abuse and significant youth protection policy infractions must be reported to the Scouts First Helpline after mandatory reporting to law enforcement or child protective services.

Responding to Abuse

When information regarding known or suspected abuse is first discovered, the following steps should immediately be taken by those responding:

  • Get the victim medical treatment, if required, and to a place of safety if needed
  • Ensure the victim(s) parents are notified as soon as possible
  • Notify law enforcement and/or child protective services
  • Call the Scouts First Helpline

Reporting Abuse or Youth Protection Violations

Accurate information is critical to an appropriate response; however, a lack of specific information is not a reason to delay a report of known or suspected abuse or significant youth protection policy violations. At a minimum, every effort should be made to have the following information available when reporting to the Scouts First Helpline:

  • The name, age, council, and unit of the alleged victim(s)
  • The name and phone number of the victim’s parent(s)
  • The name, age, council, and unit of any other known or suspected victim(s) and their parents contact information
  • The name, position, council, and unit of alleged perpetrator(s)
  • The name and phone number of the law enforcement or protective service agency to which the incident was reported
  • The name, unit, and council of any known witnesses
  • The name and phone number of the reporter
  • Details of the incident: who, what, where, and when

The reporter may also be asked to submit the information on a Youth Protection/Membership Incident Information Form (paper or online).

Hours of Operation

The Scouts First Helpline will be answered 24/7. The call may initially be answered by a person who gathers initial information and then escalates the report for further handling.

Questions or Concerns

Questions regarding the Scouts First Helpline and the above procedures should be directed to BSA Membership Standards at 972-580-2365 or 972-580-2007.

NOTE: The Scouts First Helpline is for reporting abuse or significant violations of the BSA’s youth protection policies only. While all youth protection policies must be taken seriously, minor, non-recurring infractions with no indication youth are at risk can be addressed at the unit level. Any other questions should continue to be directed to the BSA’s Member Care team at 972-580-2489.

Never Miss a Post 

Posted by Darlene Scheffler Wednesday, July 12, 2017 6:09:00 PM

To keep up with the latest council news, like us on Facebook.

How to Never Miss a Post

Once you've liked our council's Facebook page, click on 'Following' and select 'See First.' Our posts will appear at the top of your News Feed no matter what time of day you visit Facebook.

Remember to follow your district's Facebook page as well. 

 

Help spread the word about Scouting on Facebook

 

Engage.

Click, like, comment, and share our posts. 

 

Mention the council in your posts. 

Type "@Sam Houston Area Council" and then select the council from the list that appears.

 

Share Memories.

Share your Scouting memories with us by sending photos and videos.  You can post them on our wall or send them to us as a message. You may just see them posted on our wall.

 

Invite Friends.

Invite your Scouting friends to Like our page. 

 

 

The Sam Houston Area Council is focusing on leveraging the power of communications through websites and on social media through Facebook.  The more Scouters share and repost, the more powerful our marketing can be.

Share your unit social media sites

While we are currently focused on Facebook, we have plans to expand to other types of social media. 

We are compiling a list of unit social media sites so we can work together to spread the word about Scouting by tagging, liking commenting and sharing each other posts. 

Would you like your unit website to be listed on your district website?  If so, please complete our social media survey.

Sam Houston Area Council
Social Media Channels

Facebook icon     

  flickr icon  you tube icon

New Online Membership Registration 

Posted by Darlene Scheffler Thursday, March 9, 2017 3:49:00 AM

Great news!

Scouting families and prospective Scouting families have asked for it, and now it is here!

Beginning this fall, the traditional paper registration method will not be the only way to join Scouting. This is a giant leap forward in allowing prospective members and leaders to register in a way that's convenient for them, and it creates a more efficient and user-friendly registration experience for units, districts, and councils.

Beginning in April, a new online registration option will launch. This option will be convenient and safe and, because it offers greater efficiency, it will allow the ability to reach and serve more youth.  

All applications and payment of the registration fees can be completed online. This will eliminate the need for travel to the Cockrell Scout Center to turn in and pay for new applications.

More Information
 

Before You Start – Preparation Checklist

There are important steps you must take to prepare!

It is critical that you complete all items on the checklist for your Scouting role below to ensure you are granted the necessary permissions to work within the online registration system. Access to information, and the ability to take action within the system, is granted based on these permissions. To have the appropriate access, your role, council name, and a valid email address must be listed correctly in your my.scouting tools profile.

 

Training Videos 

 

How-To Files 

My.Scouting.org

One of the requirements to access online membership registration is the charter organization representative, unit leader and committee chairman must have a My.Scouting account. This account will allow approval online of all applications. When registering for an account a BSA member ID number is required. This number is found on BSA membership cards.  

Set up an My.Scouting Account 

Special Message to LDS Units

Units chartered to the LDS Church are automatically recognized in the online registration system. Your registration fees will continue to be paid directly by the Church headquarters in Salt Lake City. Therefore, your invoice should show a balance of $0.00 for registration fees.

However, families will be given the opportunity to purchase Boys' Life magazine, which is not covered by the Church and will be on the invoice at checkout for the family to pay.

Contacts, FAQs, Assistance

My.Scouting

  1. Visit the website 
  2. Contact Member Care Contact Center at myscouting@scouting.org or 972-580-2489


BSA member ID number

  1. Ask the unit leader or unit commissioner. They can access My.Scouting Tools and look up individual member IDs in the Member Manager tool. The member ID is also on a roster from Internet Advancement that's accessible under Menu/Legacy Web Tools/Internet Advancement.
  2. Contact Donna Burke at donna.burke@scouting.org or 713-756-3398 
  3. Contact the Member Care Contact Center: myscouting@scouting.org or 972-580-2489

Online registration

  1. Registration workflow
  2. FAQs
  3. Questions about the preparation checklist, contact the Member Care Contact Center at myscouting@scouting.org or 972-580-2489
  4. District executive

BeAScout.org

District website units page

  • Send updates to district webmaster (use website feedback form under the resources tab on district website)

 

Does Scouting Work? 

Posted by Darlene Scheffler Wednesday, March 1, 2017 11:56:00 AM

Source:  Scouting Wire

For 106 years (as of this week) Boy Scouts of America has been the nation’s foremost youth program of character development and values-based leadership training, helping young people to be “Prepared. For Life.” We know it, parents know it, Scouts and Scouters know it – but we wanted scientific proof that Scouting positively impacts character development in youth. So we got it and shared it on Scouting Wire.

Scouting Builds Positive Character

To recap, a research team from Tufts University worked with the Cradle of Liberty Council to measure the character attributes of both Scouts and non-Scouts. The project, which was funded by the John Templeton Foundation and led by Dr. Richard M. Lerner, surveyed nearly 1,800 Cub Scouts and nearly 400 non-Scouts to better understand character development of Scouts. After a two-and-a-half-year period, the study proved Scouting builds positive character and prepares young people for life.

Add This New Video to Your Toolkit

We packaged up some helpful tools to further show the value of Scouting in Resources to Help You Prove the Value of Scouting – but now we’ve got one more asset to add to your council’s toolkit!

Internet users – especially millennials- are consuming more video content than ever, so it’s important to reach potential Scouting families via the medium that’s most engaging and interesting to them. The video below showcases the study’s findings in a brief, animated summary that’s easy to understand and fun to watch. It’s the perfect recruiting tool to highlight why Scouting is the right choice for any parent seeking valuable experiences for their children.

Watch the video for yourself and then share in your councils and social networks. You can share the video from YouTube and download it via the Marketing and Membership Hub

Update Your Pin at BeAScout.org 

Posted by Darlene Scheffler Tuesday, February 14, 2017 6:45:00 AM

Unit Leaders:

Make sure your unit’s information is correct on BeAScout.org.  BeAScout.org is a tool prospective families use to find units to join. Is your unit information up to date or do you have the unit leader from three years ago as your contact?

We suggest you list your feeder school(s) and/or church in the description. If your unit does not have a website, refer them to the district website (preferably the unit’s page, for example, www.raven.shac.org/units). 

The following registered leaders in your unit have the ability to update your unit's meeting location and contact information:

(A) Unit Leader: this means your Cubmaster, Scoutmaster, Varsity Coach, Crew Advisor or Skipper
(B) Unit Committee Chair
(C) Chartered Organization Representative

Here’s what you need to do to update your unit's pin - the whole process should take less than 10 minutes:

  • Step 1. Log onto your account at “MyScouting.org” and select “BeAScout” from the Unit Tools section on the left-hand menu. A new page will be displayed: There are two "tabs" on this window, and you should be on "Unit Pin Management" - if not, then click the "Unit Pin Management" tab. 
  • Step 2. Take a moment to look over the Unit Pin Management screen: If at any time you are lost, look for the "Help" link in the upper right-hand corner of the page for help.  Also, note that the "Google Pin Preview" section, in the bottom-right area of the page, will display what will appear on the Google map.  It will change as you enter/edit information in these steps. 
  • Step 3. Check the "Unit Description" - this box contains a combination of your unit name and your chartered organization. If that the information is incorrect then reach out to your district executive (DE) for assistance. 
  • Step 4: If your Scout unit has a website, enter the web address (URL).  Otherwise, enter your district website, preferably the unit’s page on the district website (e.g., www.raven.shac.org/units). You can always edit this field later if your unit establishes a website.
  • Step 5. Update the Alternate Unit Description: many units opt to type their unit type and number followed by their meeting location (example: "Pack 867 - Lincoln Elementary")
     
  • Step 6: Make sure the Pin Status says "Active" if you want your pin visible to perspective Scouts and parents on the map. 
     
  • Step 7a: Select your primary contact. The primary contact will receive all emails from prospective Scout parents, so be sure to let the person know that they will be responding to all parent leads. If the fields in this section are "grey" then you must check the "Contact Person" box in the "Fields Displayed on Google Pin" section at the bottom-left side of the page.  If the person is already a registered adult leader in your Scout unit, then their name will be selectable from a list.  Once selected, all information is automatically provided in this section's fields. 
     
  • Step 7b: Also be sure to check all the information with the primary contact volunteer and edit fields that are no longer current (e.g., phone number, email address). It is very important that you keep this information up-to-date as volunteers and contact information will change over time.
     
  • Step 8. Enter the location where your unit holds its meetings (address information). This address will dictate where your unit pin will appear on Google Maps.  Note that it may be helpful to enter the name of your meeting location "address 1" and the street address on "address 2"
  • Step 9. Type special announcements, up to 133 characters, in the box under Special Announcements. We suggest you list your feeder school(s) and/or church.
  • Step 10. Check the Google PIN preview - this is a preview of what will appear on the map. Parents will only be able to see what is in this box, so please review it carefully for accuracy. 

NOTE: There is an option to change the icon from a Scouting map symbol representing your unit type to something else. Please DO NOT change the unit logo icon.

  • Step 10. Once you are done, click the “SAVE” button and your information will be uploaded.

That’s all you need to do to set up your unit for BeAScout.org. Be sure to do this as soon as possible so your unit will get recruiting leads.

Verify unit information on district website

Verify the unit contact information on your district website. There is a unit page on the toolbar of every district website.  Please make sure your unit’s information is correct.  There is a link at the top of the page to submit corrections to the webmaster.  The information on this page is important as this information shows up in internet searches. Also, fill out our social media survey, so we can help promote your unit.

Scouting Apps 

Posted by Darlene Scheffler Wednesday, February 1, 2017 8:00:00 AM

Boys’ Life Magazine and Scouting Magazine Apps 

Source:  Scouting Newsroom Blog

Boys’ Life and Scouting magazines have two official mobile apps. Both apps can now be downloaded directly to your mobile device to make the world of Scouting available at your fingertips. 

Boys’ Life has been delivering fascinating and fun content to readers on ink and paper for decades, but new technology brings a new level of content. Readers will still get all the content they love — Scouts in Action, jokes, cartoons and super Scouting outings — plus access to new multimedia content such as videos, slideshows and easy social media sharing.

Downloading the app is as easy as typing “Boys’ Life magazine” into the search box of any app store, including Apple, Google Play and Amazon Kindle. Readers can also sport the new version of the classic publication on their wrist — Boys’ Life is available for Apple Watch too.

Both apps are free to download and once you open either app, you can elect to purchase an annual subscription for either magazine.

Current subscribers to the print version of Boys’ Life will receive the digital subscription for free. To access the app, all you’ll need to do is input your account number, which can be located on your magazine’s address label. Those who are not subscribed can buy a digital subscription though the app, or they can subscribe at the half-price “Scout rate” using special promo code FBTW0216 on the Boys’ Life website.

Find the Scouting magazine app on any app store simply by searching “Scouting magazine USA” or try “BSA” (the UK Scout Association has already published its Scouting magazine). Subscriptions to the digital Scouting — which includes the entire 103-year Scouting archive — are available via in-app purchase for just $4.99 a year.

Boys’ Life and Scouting magazine apps offer access to more than a century of content. (Photo credit: Scouting magazine)

Decades of Scouting Literature at Your Fingertips

Digital subscribers of Boys’ Life can buy almost any single copy dating to the very first issue, published March 1, 1911. Scoutingmagazine subscribers will have direct access to all of that publication’s content from 1913 to today. This means with the apps, you’ve got every issue of each magazine ever produced, right in your pocket.

Boys’ Life and Scouting magazines publish quality information and entertainment for a wide variety of audiences, and you don’t have to be a registered Scouter to subscribe.

The release of the apps makes anywhere, anytime, any place an opportunity to read your favorite Scouting publications.